» » Babylon: Mesopotamia and the Birth of Civilization

epub Babylon: Mesopotamia and the Birth of Civilization download

by Paul Kriwaczek

  • ISBN: 1848871562
  • Author: Paul Kriwaczek
  • ePub ver: 1819 kb
  • Fb2 ver: 1819 kb
  • Rating: 4.9 of 5
  • Language: English
  • Pages: 320
  • Publisher: Atlantic Books; Main - Atlantic edition (2010)
  • Formats: lrf mbr lit doc
  • Category: History
  • Subcategory: Ancient Civilizations
epub Babylon: Mesopotamia and the Birth of Civilization download

Babylon by Paul Kriwaczek is certainly not modest in its choice of subject: Mesopotamian history from 3000 to 500 . But it is somewhat like histories of Western civilization that begin with Athens and go on to describe post Cold War America and Europe.

Babylon by Paul Kriwaczek is certainly not modest in its choice of subject: Mesopotamian history from 3000 to 500 . So many distinct cultures, so many technological innovations, so many dramatis personae that all one gets is a briefly drawn sketch of each era. For the non-specialist this may be sufficient. But for one who wants to take in the wafts from the Hanging Gardens it comes up somewhat short

In Babylon, Paul Kriwaczek tells the story of ancient Mesopotamia from th. .Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking Babylon: Mesopotamia and the Birth of Civilization as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

In Babylon, Paul Kriwaczek tells the story of ancient Mesopotamia from th.

In Babylon, Paul Kriwaczek tells the story of Mesopotamia from the earliest settlements seven thousand years ago to the eclipse of Babylon in the sixth century BCE. Bringing the people of this land to life in vibrant detail, the author chronicles the rise and fall of power during this period an. Bringing the people of this land to life in vibrant detail, the author chronicles the rise and fall of power during this period and explores the political and social systems, as well as the technical and cultural innovations, which made this land extraordinary

Электронная книга "Babylon: Mesopotamia and the Birth of Civilization", Paul Kriwaczek.

Электронная книга "Babylon: Mesopotamia and the Birth of Civilization", Paul Kriwaczek. Эту книгу можно прочитать в Google Play Книгах на компьютере, а также на устройствах Android и iOS. Выделяйте текст, добавляйте закладки и делайте заметки, скачав книгу "Babylon: Mesopotamia and the Birth of Civilization" для чтения в офлайн-режиме.

Babylon: Mesopotamia and the Birth of Civilization. In Babylon, Paul Kriwaczek tells the story of Mesopotamia from the earliest settlements seven thousand years ago to the eclipse of Babylon in the sixth century BCE. Bringing the people of this land to life in vibrant detail, the author chronicles the rise and fall of power during this period and explores the political and social systems, as well as the technical and cultural innovations, which made this land extraordinary. At the heart of this book is the story of Babylon, which rose to prominence under the Amorite king Hammurabi from about 1800 BCE. Bringing the people of this land to life in vibrant detail, the author chronicles the rise and fall of power during this period and explores the political and social systems, as well as the technical and cultural innovations, which made this land extraordinary

For a sweeping, epic and vivid historical survey of ancient Mesopotamia, this book by Paul Kriwaczek is a great choice.

For a sweeping, epic and vivid historical survey of ancient Mesopotamia, this book by Paul Kriwaczek is a great choice. Kriwaczek takes the reader through a deftly written overview of the various cultures, emperors and kings that swept through the Mesopotamian region over the course of centuries. Specifically, he covers the years 4000-700 BCE. This is not an academic or dry text, but rather a book that makes the daily lives of many people of that time come alive, not only in descriptions of the rulers and elite classes, but also in the descriptions of the average person. Bringing the people of this land to life in vibrant detail, the author chronicles the rise and fall of power during this period and explores the political and social systems, as well as the technical and cultural innovations, which made this land extraordinary

Babylon: Mesopotamia And The Birth Of Civilization. "Paul Kriwaczek: BBC TV producer and author of engaging books on the". Retrieved 14 November 2017. Yiddish Civilisation: The Rise and Fall of a Forgotten Nation (2005), Random House, ISBN 978-1-4000-3377-5. E mc²: The Great Ideas that Shaped Our World. "Andy Roberts Music: Guitar Magazine Interview - December 1973".

In Babylon, Paul Kriwaczek tells the story of ancient Mesopotamia from the earliest settlements around 5400 BC, to the eclipse of Babylon by the Persians in the sixth century BC. He chronicles the rise and fall of dynastic power during this period; he examines its numerous material, social and cultural innovations and inventions: The wheel, civil, engineering, building bricks, the centralized state, the division of labour, organised religion, sculpture, education, mathematics, law and monumental building. At the heart of Kriwaczek's magisterial account, though, is the glory of Babylon - 'gateway to the gods' - which rose to glorious prominence under the Amorite king Hammurabi, who unified Babylonia between 1800 and 1750 BC. While Babylonian power would rise and fall over the ensuing centuries, it retained its importance as a cultural, religious and political centre until its fall to Cyrus the Great of Persia in 539 BC.
Comments (7)

crazy mashine
The author uses a 'popular documentary' style, switching between current events/recent history, myths and stories, and the real meat of the book -- the history of ancient Sumeria and the Babylonians who followed them. I'd been searching for just such a book for quite a while. He makes a special effort to recreate a vivid sense of what life was like and discusses theories of how their first brilliant inventions were conceived and developed. The civilization is pretty much in full swing when he begins -- he does not spend much time in the development of agriculture, but still gives a brief overview of development from hunter-gathering, pastoralism, and early village life to full-blown urban civilization. I highly recommend the book.
Maucage
Almost went to four stars because the illustrations in the paperback edition were not as easy to read as they might have been. But, not the author's fault, and honestly, this guy is pretty amazing. He gives you a sweeping overview of something I know little about, though I had plenty of Latin and Greek in college. In fact, that is part of his point: the history of Mesopotamia was erased, partly because of the shift from cuneiform to the alphabet. That fact alone is worth the price of the book. If you like history at all, you'd have to like this book. Kriwaczek seems to know everything (where did he learn so much about so much?). And yet, he keeps it interesting. I get that it's a lot of history to get into one book, but it's hard to imagine telling such a long and complicated story any better than he does it.
sergant
The history of Mesopotamia is a subject in which I've long had interest, but little education. I knew about the "Fertile Crescent" and had impressions from church and youthful Bible study. But I didn't know my Assyrians from my Amorites, my Akkadians from my Elamites. I didn't know anything about Ur (except that Abraham purportedly hailed fro there) or Uruk (arguably the first city to exist). I also didn't know what these cultures valued, believed, or of the little ways in which these rich cultures contributed to the civilizations that came after. They had myths, gods, commerce, agriculture, writing, political sophistication, and (beautiful) poetry, long before such things were recorded elsewhere. This book is a fantastic introduction to Mesopotamian history, and the kingdom best known to most of us -- Babylon. It also helps explain who these peoples may actually have been, as opposed to how they have been represented during the intervening centuries.
invincible
This book shows how the distant past has much to teach us, and one thing that caught me by surprise was that the financial system was every bit as complex as ours (futures and all), and it's impressive because they did it without computers. A scribe was a combination lawyer/ banker drawing up contracts, and all they had was their memory, a stick and slabs of clay. Their free-wheeling economic system crashed and burned too, usually resulting in people having to sell themselves or other family members into slavery to cover their debts. Fortunately we have now have bankruptcy as an option and have done away with the slavery, but you can see that either way there is no happy ending. It's too bad this isn't widely known or maybe someone might have spotted the parallels with our own situation in time to avert trouble.

The book is packed with fascinating facts and you learn a lot about why the Middle East is the way it is. Some thinking that seems backward to us makes perfect sense when you find out the context and back-story; we still may not agree with it but at least we will understand it better. This should be a text book used in grade school when studying about the earliest civilizations instead of the boring stuff they're using now. I love history and reading but was put off this subject in school years ago due to the horrible text books, and only started reading about the period again after taking an art history course- the images drew me in. These people are interesting, and Mr. Kriwaczek makes it clear that there were some real characters. After all, history is the never-ending story of what actual people did, and it should be a crime to squeeze the life out of it. That's not a problem with this book and I enjoyed learning from it.
Hugifyn
Book was very interesting and easy to read for someone with an interest but not much knowledge of ancient Mesopotamia. There was a lot of hypothesizing about the nature of each civilization that could not easily be backed up with facts, but the discussion did create a framework to explain the history and do some compare/contrast between civilizations, which was nice for a novice. The writer did have a way of using cliched rhetorical devices over and over such as ending paragraphs with, "and he was never heard from again," or asking questions to prove a point and finishing with, "and we may never find out;" but overall, it was well written and engaging. Would definitely recommend to a non-expert interested in reading about the long arc of ancient Iraq.
Axebourne
I won't suggest that I've been a slouch in my scholarship, for I am a learning addict. But in recent years, with added teaching responsibilities for grad students and mid-life back-to-school types, the challenge has been wonderful. In Assyriology, over the decades I have kept up with the literature, and with such luminaries as Thorkild Jacobsen and Gwendolyn Leick. Susan Wise Bauer's "History of the Ancient World" I have previously promoted. My current rave is Paul Kriwaczek's "Babylon: Mesopotamia and the Birth of Civilization." Paul has been BBC's Near Eastern correspondent for some decades and so has a deep understanding of literature and place - place being the important word. Having visited the ancient sites the rest of us read about abstractly, he has the intimacy of archaeological literary tourism. It has put him in a position to synthesize the works of our scholars and diggers, to give us a portrait of life from Uruk to Nineveh to the several Babylons. It's a real wrist breaker - finally, a book on Mesopotamian antiquity which I can recommend to doctoral candidates in other fields.

Related to Babylon: Mesopotamia and the Birth of Civilization: