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epub The Emancipation Proclamation download

by John Hope Franklin

  • ISBN: 0882959077
  • Author: John Hope Franklin
  • ePub ver: 1935 kb
  • Fb2 ver: 1935 kb
  • Rating: 4.9 of 5
  • Language: English
  • Pages: 155
  • Publisher: Wiley-Blackwell (December 16, 1994)
  • Formats: lit lrf txt docx
  • Category: History
  • Subcategory: Americas
epub The Emancipation Proclamation download

It changed the legal status under federal law of more than . million enslaved African Americans in the Confederate states from slave to free.

Lincoln's Emancipation Proclamation dispels the myths and mistakes surrounding the Emancipation Proclamation and skillfully reconstructs how America's greatest president wrote the greatest American proclamation o. .

Lincoln's Emancipation Proclamation dispels the myths and mistakes surrounding the Emancipation Proclamation and skillfully reconstructs how America's greatest president wrote the greatest American proclamation of freedom.

by John Hope Franklin. While many historians have dealt with the Emancipation Proclamation as a phase or an aspect of the Civil War, few have given more than scant attention to the evolution of the document in the mind of Lincoln, the circumstances and conditions that led to its writing, its impact on the course of the war, and its significance for later generations.

Home Browse Books Book details, The Emancipation Proclamation. A full century has elapsed since AbrahamLincoln signed the final draft of the Emancipation Proclamation. The Emancipation Proclamation. By John Hope Franklin. A large number of people were participants in the drama that culminated in the signing: members of the Cabinet, members of Congress, Negroes, religious and civic leaders, military leaders and common soldiers, clerks and telegraph operators.

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The Emancipation Proclamation book. Good book with information about the writing of the Emancipation Proclamation you did not get in American History. While Abe Lincoln may have been a good person, this book showed another side to the story. Jan 17, 2013 Elizabeth rated it really liked it. Finally finished up this slim volume during a break from my move.

Lincoln's Emancipation Proclamation dispels the myths and mistakes surrounding the Emancipation . It has been almost a half century since John Hope Franklin's classic book on the Emancipation Proclamation-the last full study of that crucial document and moment in American history-and thinking has.

Issued after the Union victory at Antietam, the Emancipation Proclamation had both moral and strategic implications for the ongoing Civil Wa.On September 22, 1862, President Abraham Lincoln issued the preliminary Emancipation Proclamation, which declared that as of January 1, 1863, all slaves in the states currently engaged in rebellion against the Union shall be then, thenceforward, and forever free.

The Emancipation Proclamation confirmed their insistence that the war for the Union must become a war for freedom. Book a primary source exhibit and a professional speaker for your next event by contacting Historic. It added moral force to the Union cause and strengthened the Union both militarily and politically. As a milestone along the road to slavery's final destruction, the Emancipation Proclamation has assumed a place among the great documents of human freedom. Our Clients include many Fortune 500 companies, associations, non-profits, colleges, universities, national conventions, pr and advertising agencies.

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Shop our inventory for The Emancipation proclamation by John Hope Franklin with fast free shipping on every used book we have in stock! . The Emancipation proclamation by John Hope Franklin.

While many historians have dealt with the Emancipation Proclamation as a phase or an aspect of the Civil War, few have given more than scant attention to the evolution of the document in the mind of Lincoln, the circumstances and conditions that led to its writing, its impact on the course of the war, and its significance for later generations. Professor John Hope Franklin's answer to this need, first published in 1963, is available again for the first time in many years. This edition includes a new preface, photo essay, and a reproduction of the 1863 handwritten draft of the Emancipation Proclamation, making it an ideal supplementary text for U.S. and African American survey courses as well as for more specialized courses on the Civil War and Reconstruction.
Comments (5)

invasion
If you are looking for a concise, well written source of information on the Emancipation Proclamation, this is it. John Hope Franklin was one of our better academic historians. His research was meticulous. His writing style was highly readable yet intended for other scholars.
This is not popular history, filled with embellishment and designed to keep the reader's attention. It is an academic approach intended for other scholars. But at the same time it is still very readable, easy to understand and very polished.
John Hope Franklin was an African-American professor of history at Duke and had a PHD. He also was so widely regarded he had more than 100 honorary degrees. From Tulsa (actually Rentiesville) Oklahoma, his father was one of the first black men to fight for the rights of displaced blacks from the 1921 Tulsa Race Riots. So John didn't just teach history, he lived it.
This book, too, gives the feeling of being alive. It feels real, like its happening now. You feel you are there, looking over Lincoln's shoulder.
It's a good read.
Anayalore
this was one of the books required for my african american experience history class last term. this reading was difficult for me due to the content, but I was able to manage. I frequently had to take breaks when reading it, or else my emotions would start to go haywire and I'd want to go back in time and give them (whites) a good ass-whooping for being utter bastards...
Rocksmith
Book uses a lot of quotes from US /world newspapers, citizens and politicians to give insight into reactions to Civil War and slavery. Quick and easy reading that provides a real look at the positive and negative toward getting the Emancipation Proclamation created and everyone's reaction after it was published. .
Umrdana
This book tells the true history behind the Emancipation Proclamation and not just what schools want you to believe. It explains how the decisions behind it were political/military strategy and not a humanitarian focus at all. It is straight forward and easy to read and has facts to back up all the statements. I think it's a good book for everyone to read and not just students in college that may or may not be required to read it to pass a class. Written by John Hope Franklin, an African-American that actually lived and taught history, it gives a brilliant account of historical events surrounding this very famous and influential historical event.
Bort
When the colonies broke away from the mother country the new republic was based on the principles of democracy and equality. But as long as slavery was the cornerstone of this republic the ideas of democracy and equality were tainted. The Emancipation Proclamation set in motion the actions, which would make these principles true for all. In the book The Emancipation Proclamation, the author John Hope Franklin, tells a story of the emancipation of slaves through as it pertained to the author of the Emancipation Proclamation, President Abraham Lincoln. He leads us through the action before, during, and after the issuing of the Emancipation Proclamation in an attempt to give us a greater understanding of the actions taken by Lincoln in the freeing of a race.
Early in 1862 many people were calling on Lincoln for the emancipation of the slaves. But at that time Lincoln didn't think it wise to emancipate them for a few reasons. First of all, he knew that emancipation would culminate in a crisis in the Border States, because many weren't willing to fight to free the slaves. Secondly he doubted the legality of emancipating the slaves. Also he wasn't really sure if whites and Negroes could coexist in peace.
But by late summer of 1862, Lincoln was convinced that the time had come for a change in policy toward slavery. Several foreign governments sympathized with the South. But they condemned slavery as evil, and thus did not dare support the Confederacy. Freed slaves could serve as Union soldiers. Besides, many Northerners who had been indifferent to slavery now believed that it had to be stamped out. Lincoln decided to issue a proclamation freeing the slaves. He did not ask the advice of his Cabinet, but he did tell the members what he intended to do. On Seward's advice, he withheld the proclamation until a northern victory created favorable circumstances.
The Battle of Antietam, fought on Sept. 17, 1862, served gave Lincoln his chance. He issued a preliminary proclamation five days later. Lincoln declared that all slaves in states, or parts of states that were in rebellion on Jan. 1, 1863 would be free. He issued the final proclamation on January 1. Lincoln named the states and parts of states in rebellion, and declared that the slaves held there "are, and hence-forward shall be, free."
This was met with a wide variety of reactions. Some people sympathized with the Confederacy. Others doubted that it was even legal. But as Union victories fell into place a vast majority of people came to support the proclamation.
Actually, the proclamation freed no slaves. It applied only to Confederate territory, where federal officers could not enforce it. The proclamation did not affect slavery in the loyal Border States. Lincoln repeatedly urged those states to free their slaves, and to pay the owners for their loss. He promised financial help from the federal government for this purpose. The failure of the states to follow his advice was one of his great disappointments.
The Emancipation Proclamation did have a great long-range effect. In the eyes of other nations, it gave a new character to the war. It gave the North a new weapon in Negro soldiers. Also in the North, it gave a high moral purpose to the struggle and paved the way for the Thirteenth Amendment to the Constitution. This amendment, adopted in December 1865, ended slavery in all parts of the United States.
Overall I found the book to be well written and very delightful. It gave an accurate account of the time during the Emancipation Proclamation. You could tell that the author held Lincoln in very high esteem, and that he felt Lincoln was the greatest instrument in the freeing of the slaves.

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