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by Kathryn Burns

  • ISBN: 0822322919
  • Author: Kathryn Burns
  • ePub ver: 1322 kb
  • Fb2 ver: 1322 kb
  • Rating: 4.7 of 5
  • Language: English
  • Pages: 320
  • Publisher: Duke University Press Books; 1St Edition edition (March 29, 1999)
  • Formats: docx lrf txt lit
  • Category: History
  • Subcategory: Americas
epub Colonial Habits: Convents and the Spiritual Economy of Cuzco, Peru download

In Colonial Habits Kathryn Burns transforms our view of nuns as marginal recluses, making them central actors on the colonial stage. Beginning with the 1558 founding of South America’s first convent.

In Colonial Habits Kathryn Burns transforms our view of nuns as marginal recluses, making them central actors on the colonial stage.

Colonial Habits book. In Colonial Habits Kathryn Burns transforms our view of nuns as marginal recluses, making them central actors on the colonial stage.

In Colonial Habits Kathryn Burns transforms our view of nuns as marginal recluses . Katheryn Burns has written a great book. Her discussion of the spiritual economy is innovative and needs to be explored by more people. Burns uncovers a history that has been neglected by most historians but is integral to one's understanding of colonial Latin America. In short, this is must read for anyone interested in the subject.

Other readers will always be interested in your opinion of the books you've read. Whether you've loved the book or not, if you give your honest and detailed thoughts then people will find new books that are right for them

Other readers will always be interested in your opinion of the books you've read. Whether you've loved the book or not, if you give your honest and detailed thoughts then people will find new books that are right for them. 1. El catolicismo liberal en España.

Article in Journal of Interdisciplinary History 31(1):138-140 · July 2000 with 128 Reads.

Convents and the Spiritual Economy of Cuzco, Peru.

In Colonial Habits Kathryn Burns transforms our view of nuns as marginal recluses, making them central actors on. .

In Colonial Habits Kathryn Burns transforms our view of nuns as marginal recluses, making them central actors on the colonial stage. Beginning with the 1558 founding of South America’s first convent, Burns shows that nuns in Cuzco played a vital part in subjugating Incas, creating a creole elite, and reproducing an Andean colonial order in which economic and spiritual interests were inextricably fused. Based on unprecedented archival research, Colonial Habits demonstrates how nuns became leading guarantors of their city’s social order by making loans, managing property, containing “unruly” women, and raising girls. Coining the phrase “spiritual economy” to analyze the intricate investments and relationships that enabled Cuzco’s convents and their backers to thrive, Burns explains how, by the late 1700s, this economy had faltered badly, making convents an emblem of decay and a focal point for intense criticism of a failing colonial regime. By the nineteenth century, the nuns had retreated from their previous roles, marginalized in the construction of a new republican order. Providing insight that can be extended well outside the Andes to the relationships articulated by convents across much of Europe, the Americas, and beyond, Colonial Habits will engage those interested in early modern economics, Latin American studies, women in religion, and the history of gender, class, and race.
Comments (4)

Ber
Extraordinary book.
Kelerius
Very well written!
Abandoned Electrical
Colonial Habits analyzes the roles that convents played in Cuzco, Peru--and by extension, in Latin America in general--from the sixteenth century to the nineteenth century. Cuzco got its first convent, Santa Clara, in 1558, within a generation of Spanish conquest, and two more convents, Santa Catalina and Santa Teresa, in the seventeenth century. Burns argues that the convents, though walled off from the hustle and bustle of the city, played important roles in Cuzco's community life: first as environments in which the mestiza daughters of the conquerors could be educated, converted, and assimilated to Spanish colonial society; then as powerful landlords and lenders in mature colonial society; and always as power brokers in Cuzco's "spiritual economy," dispensing both prayers and social capital to the families that patronized them. After independence, Cuzco's convents declined in size and importance as new secular schools and charities took on some of their earlier roles.

One of the charming features of this book is that Burns discusses her research process as well as her conclusions: the types of documents she found, the nuns' interpretations of and responses to her research agenda, and the experience of returning daily to the locutario, the grille through which cloistered nuns communicated with the outside world. Burns's descriptions of the locutario, in particular, are wonderfully evocative. Highly recommended.
Kriau
Katheryn Burns has written a great book. Her discussion of the spiritual economy is innovative and needs to be explored by more people. Burns uncovers a history that has been neglected by most historians but is integral to one's understanding of colonial Latin America. In short, this is must read for anyone interested in the subject.

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