» » High Noon: The Inside Story of Scott McNealy and the Rise of Sun Microsystems

epub High Noon: The Inside Story of Scott McNealy and the Rise of Sun Microsystems download

by Karen Southwick

  • ISBN: 0471297135
  • Author: Karen Southwick
  • ePub ver: 1870 kb
  • Fb2 ver: 1870 kb
  • Rating: 4.7 of 5
  • Language: English
  • Pages: 256
  • Publisher: Wiley; 1 edition (August 13, 1999)
  • Formats: azw lit rtf mbr
  • Category: History
  • Subcategory: Americas
epub High Noon: The Inside Story of Scott McNealy and the Rise of Sun Microsystems download

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High Noon reveals the inside story of a world-class IT company. It provides an insider's view at the business strategies of Sun Microsystems and its gutsy leader, CEO Scott McNealy.

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High Noon is the inside story of Sun's rise to power, from its shaky start in. .The book has 12 chapters, each describing a period of Sun's company history.

High Noon is the inside story of Sun's rise to power, from its shaky start in Silicon Valley through its transformation under the aggressive and inspirational leadership of McNealy. Karen Southwick reveals the behind-the-scenes maneuverings of McNealy and Sun, with candid interviews from the key players and insights into the inner workings of the high-tech industry.

Author Karen Southwick has pulled off an impressive feat: She's written "the inside story" on Sun Microsystems and its unconventional founder, Scott McNealy, without actually talking to McNealy. This book examines how scrappy underdog Sun overcame its larger and supposedly tougher competitors, combining hard work, tenacity, and talented people to build a more innovative and flexible company.

Ellison’s drive and fierce ambition created Oracle out of the dust and built it into one of America’s great technology companies, but his unpredictable management style keeps it constantly on the edge of both success and disaster. The hostile bid for PeopleSoft is just the most recent example.

In 1982, a little upstart named Sun was making waves in the high-tech industry with its groundbreaking workstation technology, even as early competitors dismissed the company as not worth losing sleep over. Since then, Sun Microsystems has become a formidable presence in the industry, making its own rules and taking no prisoners, and is currently poised to reach the highest point of its ascendancy-the challenge of Microsoft's dominance over the future of computing.

Insider?s view of Sun Microsystems & Scott McNealy. High Noon reveals the inside story of a world-class IT company. unique Silicon Valley company. Published by Thriftbooks. com User, 19 years ago. Karen Southwick of San Francisco, California has been writing about technology and Silicon Valley for more than a decade, first with San Francisco Chronicle, then Upside magazine and most recently, Forbes ASAP. She also authored Silicon Gold Rush. com User, 20 years ago.

Manufacturer: John Wiley & Sons Release date: 10 September 1999 ISBN-10 : 0471297135 ISBN-13: 9780471297130.

In 1982, a little upstart named Sun was making waves in the high-tech industry with its groundbreaking workstation technology, even as early competitors dismissed the company as not worth losing sleep over. Since then, Sun Microsystems has become a formidable presence in the industry, making its own rules and taking no prisoners, and is currently poised to reach the highest point of its ascendancy--the challenge of Microsoft's dominance over the future of computing. The driving force behind this once fledgling company is a man who has been described as brash, unconventional, ambitious, forward-looking, and sometimes even his own worst enemy. Scott McNealy turned Sun into the multibillion-dollar success it is today--a developer of innovative software like Java that is revolutionizing the computing landscape. High Noon is the inside story of Sun's rise to power, from its shaky start in Silicon Valley through its transformation under the aggressive and inspirational leadership of McNealy. Karen Southwick reveals the behind-the-scenes maneuverings of McNealy and Sun, with candid interviews from the key players and insights into the inner workings of the high-tech industry. This book examines how scrappy underdog Sun overcame its larger and supposedly tougher competitors, combining hard work, tenacity, and talented people to build a more innovative and flexible company. You'll learn how McNealy moved Sun up the industry food chain, challenging more established companies like Hewlett-Packard and Digital Equipment by expanding Sun's product line and refocusing the business. High Noon expertly chronicles McNealy's triumphant history with Sun, from his early days as vice president of manufacturing to a CEO known for shooting straight from the hip without regard for the consequences. You'll discover how "Javaman"--as Fortune magazine dubbed McNealy--prompted Sun to take risks that ultimately allowed it to survive, thrive, and dominate--making Microsoft stand up and take notice. And you'll see how Sun's looming showdown with this industry giant promises wide-reaching implications for businesses and consumers alike. Among High Noon's revelations: * A new perspective on how the complex, contradictory McNealy shaped his company and fashioned its strategy * Insight into central issues facing the high-tech industry, such as network computers and the future of the Internet * An insider view of the maneuverings of industry powerhouses, including Microsoft, Oracle, Netscape, IBM, and Intel * Both entertaining and instructive, High Noon offers valuable lessons for taking charge of your destiny and succeeding in a fast-paced, unpredictable, and even hostile environment. Advance Praise for Karen Southwick's High Noon "High Noon captures the electricity and drama of one of the most important high-tech sagas of our time. Rich with insight as well as previously undisclosed stories."--Jim Moore, Founder, GeoPartners Research, Inc. Author of The Death of Competition "High Noon reveals the inside story of one of the companies Microsoft fears most, Sun Microsystems. Southwick uses her keen insight to tell the story of how four twenty-somethings created a company that has grown from a small seller of scientific computers to one of the most dominant high-tech firms in the world."--Eric Nee, Editor, Fortune "Scott McNealy is one of the most complex, fascinating individuals in high tech. Karen Southwick captures the contrarian spirit of Sun Microsystems and the intriguing personalities that run it."--Howard Anderson, President, The Yankee Group "High Noon takes us on a straight path to the future."--Dr. Eric Schmidt, Chairman and CEO, Novell, Inc. "High Noon illustrates how a company can succeed in the technology industry through a delicate balance between drive, talent, and timing."--Carol Bartz, Chairman and CEO, Autodesk
Comments (7)

EXIBUZYW
I had high hoped for high noon. I regularly read company biographies and Sun was an very interesting company (before Oracle swallowed them). However, I ended up a bit unsatisfied. Yes, it had some interesting inside stories, but overall it felt shallow and too much Microsoft focused. It is also interesting that the book got published in 1999 which was probably still the best period for Sun, after which things turned worst and they eventually got eaten up by their large partner...

The book has 12 chapters, each describing a period of Sun's company history. There is actually not that much about the early years, except that it explains how Sun was founded, how Scott McNealy got into power at Sun and how is defeated their major competitors and grew to a large company.

Also already some of the early chapters, unfortunately, there is a lot of focus on Sun vs. Microsoft. I mean, Sun vs. Microsoft is definitively interesting and worth a chapter, but I didn't felt it needed to be mentioned again and again and again. Especially in the earlier chapters, it disappointed me.

The chapters that interested me most were the ones where the author described how Sun created their major innovations: Spark, Solaris, Java. The major drawback of the stories was that both the inside stories and the technical details were sort-of missing. It was still interesting, yet it could have been a lot better.

The later chapters nearly only focus on Microsoft vs. Sun and that got a bit boring. The book ends up trying to predict the future of Sun, which was insightful yet a bit off the mark.

All in all, the book was ok. It wasn't bad and I enjoyed reading it. Yet, I wouldn't recommend it as I had wished a less MS focused and more inside-story version of the history of Sun. So, 3 stars... just ok.
Gabar
Unlike most books of the high-tech, hero-worship genre, these authors actually did their homework and then wrote an intelligent, well organized history of Sun Microsystems and Scott McNealy. Given the multiple transformations that Sun has gone through (workstations, chip design, software design, servers, memory systems, enterprise hardware and software, and Java), as well as its famous feud with Microsoft and Mister Bill, that is no easy task, but they provide a succinct (225 page) and unbiased view that will be of interest to anyone who is interested in learning more about these subjects. The endnotes are particularly helpful.

Although the authors were not able to interview McNealy (he turned down their request), they do include intelligent observations about him and Sun from knowledgeable persons both within and outside Sun. Given the shallowness of McNealy's public comments and statements in other interviews to date (one suspects that he is finally learning to put a governor on his mouth), the omission is not noticeable.

It is rumored that Ms. Southwick is in the process of preparing a similar volume about Oracle and Larry Ellison. If so, it will be a welcome improvement over the swill (e.g., "The Oracle of Oracle" by Florence Stone) that has been published about them to date.
Terr
High Noon reveals the inside story of a world-class IT company. It provides an insider's view at the business strategies of Sun Microsystems and its gutsy leader, CEO Scott McNealy. Sun Microsystems (creators of the Java programming language) is now in a position to challenge high-tech's most powerful players over the future of computing. This is due in large part to its practical, ambitious, and forward-looking CEO.
High Noon is a thorough case study of this successful company, from its birth as the brainchild of Indian immigrant Vinod Khosla in 1982, through its rise under McNealy's brash and unconventional methods, to its current battle with Microsoft, which will undoubtedly change the landscape of the computer industry. This entertaining and instructive book reveals the behind-the-scenes maneuverings of McNealy and Sun, with candid interviews from the key players that provide insight into the inner workings of the high-tech industry.
High Noon will appeal to managers interested in applying Sun's innovative tactics to their own companies, as well as anyone intrigued by the compelling success story of this unique Silicon Valley company.
Karen Southwick of San Francisco, California has been writing about technology and Silicon Valley for more than a decade, first with San Francisco Chronicle, then Upside magazine and most recently, Forbes ASAP. She also authored Silicon Gold Rush.
Ranicengi
Author Karen Southwick reveals how a few kids from Stanford University turned Sun Microsystems into a $10 billion industry powerhouse. This incredibly detailed book revisits many of the key moments in Sun's history, leading up to the recent excitement over the Java programming language. The author shows how Scott McNealy's unique personal style played an instrumental part in Sun's direction. Despite McNealy's prominence in the book, this is really a saga about Sun Microsystems and the technology economy. While she makes some effort to provide McNealy's biography, the author is clearly more interested in the strategic corporate moves Sun made to position itself for the future. We at getAbstract.com recommend this book as essential reading for anyone in the early stages of a technology start-up, and fascinating reading for anyone even slightly interested in business.

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