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by Marc Wortman

  • ISBN: 1586484443
  • Author: Marc Wortman
  • ePub ver: 1112 kb
  • Fb2 ver: 1112 kb
  • Rating: 4.8 of 5
  • Language: English
  • Pages: 320
  • Publisher: PublicAffairs (May 8, 2007)
  • Formats: mobi txt azw lrf
  • Category: History
  • Subcategory: Americas
epub The Millionaires' Unit: The Aristocratic Flyboys Who Fought the Great War and Invented American Air Power download

The Millionaires' Unit is the story of a gilded generation of young men from the .

The Millionaires' Unit is the story of a gilded generation of young men from the zenith of privilege: a Rockefeller. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.

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Wortman makes you feel as if you're in the air flying with them.

book by Marc Wortman. Wortman makes you feel as if you're in the air flying with them. Don't miss it. An Inquiry into the Culture of Leadership.

Автор: Wortman Marc Название: The Millionaires& Unit: The Aristocratic Flyboys Who . After some online sleuthing, Sturm connected with Wortman’s son, who relayed that an archive of more than five thousand illustrations was literally sitting in his shed in dire need of rescuing.

After some online sleuthing, Sturm connected with Wortman’s son, who relayed that an archive of more than five thousand illustrations was literally sitting in his shed in dire need of rescuing.

Although American tried to remain neutral in the years before World War I, she was forced to act in 1918. The Millionaires' Unit - its first designation was as the First Yale Unit of the . But in 1916, a group of Yale students, young men who wanted their country to be prepared for war, formed their own air force, bought their own planes, paid for their own flight training and expenses - through the largesse of their parents for the most part. Navy Air Reserve - served proudly in Europe and its members succeeded in leadership positions quickly, often put in command of much older men with more years of military service than they had.

Find many great new & used options and get the best deals for The Millionaires' Unit: The . Book Condition and format : Excellent, Hardcover.

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The Millionaires' Unit is the story of a gilded generation of young men from the .

The Millionaires' Unit is the story of a gilded generation of young men from the zenith of privilege: a Rockefeller, the son of the head of the Union Pacific Railroad, several who counted friends and relatives among presidents and statesmen of the da. For readers of Flyboys, The Greatest Generation, or Flags Of Our Fathers, this patriotic, romantic, absorbing book is narrative military history of the best kind.

Marc Wortman is an award-winning freelance writer whose work has appeared in numerous national magazines. He also taught literature and writing at Princeton University and in a college program for inmates at Rahway State Prison in New Jersey. He lives in New Haven with his wife and daughter.

Marc Wortman talked about his book The Millionaire’s Unit: The Aristocratic Flyboys who Fought the Great War and Invented American Airpower, published by PublicAffairs. In his book Mr. Wortman chronicles the history of the Yale Flying Club. The author describes the club members as privileged, patriotic youths who became trained military pilots and served in both the navy and the air service during World War I. Many of the members of the Yale Flying Club went on to serve in leadership during World War II. He responded to questions from members of the audience.

The Millionaires' Unit is the story of a gilded generation of young men from the zenith of privilege: a Rockefeller, the son of the head of the Union Pacific Railroad, several who counted friends and relatives among presidents and statesmen of the day. They had it all and, remarkably by modern standards, they were prepared to risk it all to fight a distant war in France. Driven by the belief that their membership in the American elite required certain sacrifice, schooled in heroism and the nature of leadership, they determined to be first into the conflict, leading the way ahead of America's declaration that it would join the war. At the heart of the group was the Yale flying club, six of whom are the heroes of this book. They would share rivalries over girlfriends, jealousies over membership in Skull and Bones, and fierce ambition to be the most daring young man over the battlefields of France, where the casualties among flyers were chillingly high. One of the six would go on to become the principal architect of the American Air Force's first strategic bomber force. Others would bring home decorations and tales of high life experiences in Paris. Some would not return, having made the greatest sacrifice of all in perhaps the last noble war. For readers of Flyboys, The Greatest Generation, or Flags Of Our Fathers, this patriotic, romantic, absorbing book is narrative military history of the best kind.
Comments (7)

Vit
A well-researched account of the Yale students who started a Navy aerial group before the US was involved in WWI.
The first half of the book describes life at Yale in the mid-teens when the college was basically a social club for rich and privileged sons of well-to-do business families, primarily from the East Coast. Scholarship had little to do with the seemingly continuous social and sports activities at Yale for these young me who strived to climb the social ladder. A bit tiring for modern eyes.
The second half tells how the Navy gradually accepted this group of would-be flyers, succumbing in part to pressure from well-connected family and friends of the Yalies and very gradually to the realization that the US would eventually be sending military aid to beleaguered Europe.
They gradually matured from party-school kids to experienced airmen and some later aided US preparation and participation in WWII, colored by their experiences 20 years before.
Djang
This is a real hidden gem and great read for anyone interested in U.S. history of WW I and the origins of our "Establishment" and more so our military aviation, especially the Navy's fly boys.

The author is an elitist-educated and employed writer who has been well-situated in life, enabling his writing of this fascinating book. In his introduction, Wortman writes, "Today, relatively few young Americans from comparable [elitist] backgrounds would consider military service -- or self-sacrificing service of any kind as an obligation that comes with the privileges that define their lives." This candid confession of perhaps one of those types is revealing and assuring that the author isn't merely interested in blowing smoke about a bunch of sugar-spooned, spoiled brats who think an HYP education sets them apart from the common folk.

This is a well-conceived and written story about a group of young men, with lots of specific, personal insight to a handful of members, who all went on to great things. Yes, they all came from great "things", read largess, power, privilege, but they used that for so much more than becoming a government drone. These men were real heroes. In this time when we watch elitist snobs and persons of dwarfed-character coming out of the Ivy League, sure they are American royalty, this book is a refreshing look back at what and who these Yalies once were. Don't we need to know there were once men like these?!? I do.

If you love history, particularly military and/or aviation and/or WW I turn-of-the-century stuff. Or just a fascinating insight into the lives of a handful of sons of industrial and commerce barons, try this. I love it!
Tygralbine
The days of the noblesse oblige are long gone since these scions of very wealthy families sacrificed their own money and eventually lives getting our country ready for the Great War. The many graduates and undergraduates of the Ivy League schools strongly felt the need to serve and lead their country. Their sacrifice didn't end with WWI. They continued their efforts after the war to ensure that our country was ready for WWII. The graduates of these old establishment institutions no longer feel the need to give any service to their country, but seem only to be motivated to satisfy their personal greed. The courage of their forbears made incredible sacrifices in rickety biplanes to defeat the Hun. In more recent times their progeny seem more dedicated to avoiding service to their countries. The author has shared with us the dedication of these heroes of the early 1900s selflessly serving their country. It was an interesting and inspiring read.
Ferne
"The Millionaire's Unit" by Marc Wortman is a fascinating, moving and meticulously researched account of an explosive chapter in modern history that becomes more faded with each passing second. Even as we rapidly approach the 100th anniversary of World War I, it is almost saddening that a moment so perfectly suited for motion picture, literature, and even video games remains so foreign to today's audiences. I write this in particularly those young enough to have served alongside these soldiers. "The Millionaire's Unit" clears these cobwebs and reintroduces WWI in HD with detailed histories and profiles of these young men from Yale who courageously spearheaded their nation in aviation. It was impossible for me to read this book without thinking about the countless pilots of science fiction as these young men ventured off into the wild blue yonder to fight a new kind of war above the clouds.

Expertly researched and beautifully told, I highly recommend this book.
Uscavel
As a kid, my favorite book was, "Iron Men with Wooden Wings" by Lou Cameron. Stories of World War I pilots doing battle in the skies over France and Germany in primitive, cloth covered biplanes ignited my imagination. Years later, I earned a pilot's license and have enjoyed flying my own cloth covered plane.

Recently, I was delighted to learn about and read Marc Wortman's title, "The "Millionaires' Unit", which documents the grass-roots formation of a flying squadron of fresh-faced Yale boys almost a hundred years ago. A war was raging in Europe and America was decidedly unprepared for their eventual involvement. Their experiences together at Yale gave them a deep sense of duty to a greater cause. Their privileged upbringing and family connections gave them access to the money to fund their own military flight school and to the captains of industry and state to endorse and champion their mission. Millionaires' Unit is not simply a tale of "iron men with wooden wings", although we certainly grow with each of them from boys to men.

Much less a documentary and much more a narrative, Wortman weaves their personal ambitions and flaws together with their collective mission to fly and to serve. Not since "The Blue Max" has such a complex story of class, ambition, romance and defiance - set against the exhilarating and dangerous backdrop of the pioneering age of aviation - been told.

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