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epub The Creation of the American Republic 1776-1787 (Institute of Early American History and Culture) download

by Gordon S. Wood

  • ISBN: 0807811041
  • Author: Gordon S. Wood
  • ePub ver: 1971 kb
  • Fb2 ver: 1971 kb
  • Rating: 4.2 of 5
  • Language: English
  • Pages: 653
  • Publisher: University of North Carolina Press (June 1, 1969)
  • Formats: azw lrf mbr doc
  • Category: History
  • Subcategory: Americas
epub The Creation of the American Republic 1776-1787 (Institute of Early American History and Culture) download

Paperback, Published for the Omohundro Institute of Early American History and Culture, Williamsburg, Virginia .

Paperback, Published for the Omohundro Institute of Early American History and Culture, Williamsburg, Virginia, 675 pages. Published April 6th 1998 by Omohundro Institute and University of North Carolina Press (first published January 28th 1969). The Creation of the American Republic, 1776-1787. Chocked full of fodder for deep debate and thesis ideas The Creation of the American Republic, 1776-1787 is a dense text that is worth reading to understand and appreciate the historical complexities and nuances of our system along with its unique place in Western thought.

Series: Published for the Omohundro Institute of Early American History and . Apparently the Americans of 1776 had not fully understood the science of politics after all.

Series: Published for the Omohundro Institute of Early American History and Culture, Williamsburg, Virginia. Published by: University of North Carolina Press. One of the half dozen most important books ever written about the American Revolution.

During the decade between 1776 and 1787, American political thinking underwent a fundamental . T o describe and explain this creation became the aim of the book. I am especially grateful to the Institute of Early American.

During the decade between 1776 and 1787, American political thinking underwent a fundamental transformation. In this perceptive study of the crucial Revolutionary era, Gordon S. Wood shows how the founders of the Republic rethought the basically classical political attitudes that had led them into the Revolution and how they came to grips with the fundamental issues of government. Издательство: W. W. Norton & Company.

The Creation of The American Republic, 1776-1787; By Gordon S. Wood. 653 pp. Published for the Institute of Early American History and Culture at Williamsburg, V. by the University of North Carolina Press, Chapel Hill. The New York Times Archives.

Gordon Wood undertook this enormous work after receiving his Ph. D. in history from Harvard and this was . This is a complex history. in history from Harvard and this was essentially the continuation of the work he undertook as a graduate student. First, the American colonists had to find common ground, across thirteen very different colonies, to fight a grueling, draining war against the vast power of Great Britain.

Includes bibliographical references. page 243-274 are missing in the original book.

Read The Creation of the American Republic, 1776-1787, by Gordon S. Wood online on Bookmate – One of the half dozen most important books ever written about the American Revolution. If ever a work of history merited the appellation 'modern classic,' this is surely on. William and Mary Quarterly brilliant and sweeping interpretation of political culture in the Revolutionary generation.

Published for the Institute of Early American History and Culture at Williamsburg, V. by the .

Illuminates the concepts of the Constitution by studying the cultural situation of the colonists. Результаты поиска по книге. Отзывы - Написать отзыв. Wood has published a number of articles and books, including The Creation of the American Republic, 1776-1787, which won the Bancroft Prize and the John H. Dunning Prize in 1970, and The Radicalism of the American Revolution, winner of the Pulitzer Prize for History and the Ralph Waldo Emerson Prize in 1993.

History professor and award-winning author Gordon S. Wood was born in Concord, Massachusetts on. . Wood was born in Concord, Massachusetts on November 27, 1933. After graduating in 1955 from Tufts University he served in the US Air Force in Japan and earned his master's degree from Harvard University.

Books related to The Creation of the American Republic, 1776-1787. Published by the Omohundro Institute of Early American History and Culture and the University of North Carolina Press.

Illuminates the concepts of the Constitution by studying the cultural situation of the colonists
Comments (7)

Kata
If you stumbled upon this book because you were looking to read a history book about American Revolution, then this is the wrong book to address that desire. It is not about the events of the Revolutionary War; nor is it about the Declaration of Independence. It is a book focused exclusively on the science of politics that was developing in the years leading up to the war, its development during the war, and particularly its apotheosis after independence was declared. It is about all the debates that took place on all political and legal issues and how they were settled and resolved - if they ever truly were.

This is, by historians' consensus, one of the best and most scholarly books ever written about American history. Its scholarship is deep, penetrating and impeccable in all its facets. Gordon Wood undertook this enormous work after receiving his Ph. D. in history from Harvard and this was essentially the continuation of the work he undertook as a graduate student. However, having said that, to a layman this is also its major shortcoming: due to its immense and rigorous scholarship, the book is dense on political science theory, voluminous on quotations (and generally voluminous) and to a large degree dry. To sum it up: it is technically a monograph, and as such, it presents a topical treatment, rather than a narrative that most lay history readers are familiar with.

If you are a history buff, or a student doing research, this will be a great and epic read. But if you are looking for a more familiar popular history, rich in narrative and a more fluid prose, then you will be disappointed and would be advised to look elsewhere. Indeed, Gordon Wood has written other more accessible works later in his career, all of which are terrific. With those reservations in mind, I still highly recommend this book.
Vizuru
Although this book was written 44 years ago, it is just as relevant today as it was then. How the people of 1787 managed to write a Constitution and create an entirely different type of political system has been one of history’s most amazing stories of all time. Gordon Wood wrote a magnificent book which explained how that event occurred. By studying the writings of the main participants and the hundreds of political pamphlets written in that era he managed to discern the various streams of political thought of that time. Only by understanding how the people of that time thought regarding politics was he able to see how they accomplished this improbable feat. Improbable it was because what they did was completely different than anything done to that point in time.

In understanding the context of this book we also need to realize that Wood wrote it during the 1960s at the height of the divide over American political thought in that time. Creation should serve as a metaphor for American political thought. Things were in a dire crisis in the 1780s, yet the country survived by creating a government which has lasted ever since. The events of the 1960s were survivable and of course we know that America overcame them and continued on. Today we see the political strife, yet we should be comforted by understanding that history shows America will overcome this as well. If the people of the 1780s could develop an entirely new government which they felt was the capstone to the American Revolution and inaugurated a new political system, then the people of today will get past the issues that divide them.

Thomas Paine wrote, “The independence of America considered merely as a separation from England, would have been a matter but of little importance had it not been accompanied by a revolution in the principles and practise of governments.” Paine was right. Independence was of little consequence because until the creation of the Constitution the thirteen states were merely carrying on a modified form of English constitutional government. That meant that government was a compact between rulers and the ruled or the people. The American system of government created in 1787 was a compact only between the people themselves, not the rulers or any other body. All government stemmed from them. Wood makes this the focal point of the book.

The issue of representation was the driving force of the American Revolution. James Otis remarked early on that taxation required representation which the American colonists had none of in Parliament. This was a unique idea and one the British finally answered with the concept of virtual representation. However, the Americans felt this was not the right answer. In creating a political system they sought an answer to the question of how people should be represented. Throughout this book Wood keeps coming back to this issue. At the end of it he answers it but the reader sees in the pages leading up to the answer how the people of that era arrived at the answer which is important. Wood explains that it was the process of answering that question that helped create the American system of government which was radically different than the English system which until that point had been considered by most people to be the proper form of government.

This shows just how different American political thought changed from British political thought and for modern students of politics why there is such a substantial difference between American government and European governments. To this day, the issue of representation is one where people can see just how free people are. When all power stems from the people and they are the ones who select their representatives, then they are free. When any part of that is removed from them then they are not free. As a result of the American system, an additional check was created upon government which does not get discussed that much and that is the check of the people themselves. No matter what, if any representative of the government acts in opposition of the will of the people they have the ability to replace that individual at the next election. In this manner the people possess the ability to correct their own mistakes if they make them.

Gordon Wood’s career has been one in which he is easily considered one of the top historians of the second half of the 20th century. He along with Edmund Morgan and Bernard Bailyn changed the perceptions people had of the American Revolution and the Constitution. Wood and Bailyn are even described as creating their own branch of historical study into this era although they certainly didn’t set out to do so. That just sort of occurred as a natural result of their studies. Wood won several awards for Creation of the American Republic including the Bancroft Prize. He would later win the Pulitzer Prize for History in 1993 with The Radicalism of the American Revolution. He is the Alva O. Way University Professor and Professor of History Emeritus at Brown University.

You can always tell when a book has made an impact upon historians. It is cited repeatedly by many of them which shows it is part of their scholarly learning. This book is required reading for all American history doctoral students who study any part of American history to 1865. It is also mandatory for all American politics doctoral students as well. It can be a bit difficult for many to read who are not acquainted with primary sources or historical inquiry. The book is definitely a deep reading experience and readers will want to read it in sections to allow for some thinking between them. It helps to remember the people of the era in question were addressing the issues confronting them and not any modern issues which were not envisioned by them. I think that is far too often ignored by many who seek answers for today’s issues. They first need to understand the issues of the past which will help them understand why the American system of government was derived. Then they can look to address today’s problems.

Wood kept great records of the materials he worked with as any good historian should and that helps students
understand where he got his information from. His comments on his sources are also revealing in that he could not find many of them in contemporary print. This is a strong indicator about why he was able to come to the conclusions he did which differed so much from others. He studied the writings of the revolutionary era, not secondary sources. This should be a lesson to all historians about the importance of primary sources over secondary sources. It should also be a lesson to all about the dangers of relying on other opinions when some of those opinions are from those are uninformed about the past or seeking to gain power by misleading people for their own political gain.

Creation is a definite must read and most worthy addition to my library and one which I am already using in my own historical writings. Wood’s work with sources helps identify primary sources to consult for my own use as well.

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