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epub T'ai Chi in a Chair: Easy 15-Minute Routines for Beginners download

by Cynthia Quarta

  • ISBN: 193141260X
  • Author: Cynthia Quarta
  • ePub ver: 1311 kb
  • Fb2 ver: 1311 kb
  • Rating: 4.6 of 5
  • Language: English
  • Pages: 240
  • Publisher: Fair Winds Press (July 1, 2001)
  • Formats: mbr docx azw rtf
  • Category: Fitness
  • Subcategory: Exercise & Fitness
epub T'ai Chi in a Chair: Easy 15-Minute Routines for Beginners download

Cynthia Quarta is a t’ai chi instructor who has studied martial arts for years. She lives in Montana. The other odd thing is that each exercise has a second description in a different format in the "15-minute exercises" section.

Cynthia Quarta is a t’ai chi instructor who has studied martial arts for years. Sometimes, in reading both descriptions, you can get a better idea of what the exercise does. But not all, as in the case of "Repulse Monkey. ) The problem with this duplication is that it's not easy to just flip through and get a list of the exercises for the shorter sets. Still, this is a useful, if flawed resource for teachers and students alike.

When I saw this volume (Tai Chi in a chair: Easy 15-minute routines for beginners by Cynthia Quarta) for a bargain price on. .Chapter three explains the complete routine. Chapter four shows 6 fifteen-minute daily exercise routines.

It should be noted that this text does not only cover some of the basic Tai Chi exercises but also explores other esoteric topics such as acupressure’s healing points and other Asian health factors. The final chapter goes into acupressure healing points, whole-body healing points, upper-body healing points, lower-body healing points and relaxation points.

Tai Chi in a Chair : Easy 15 Minute Routines for Beginners. com User, August 25, 2001. by Cynthia W. Quarta.

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T'ai Chi in a Chair: Easy 15-Minute Routines for Beginners Cynthia Quarta. ISBN 10: 193141260X ISBN 13: 9781931412605.

Tai Chi in a Chair Cynthia Quarta 156731567315929 Tai Chi in a Chair. Tai Chi in a Chair: Easy Routines for Beginners. Judo Karate Tai Chi Moves Tai Chi For Beginners Chinese Martial Arts Pilates Heath And Fitness Office Exercise Chair Exercises Senior Fitness. Kung Fu Book Ti Chi Qigong Mma Martial Arts Martial Combat Sport Martial Art Mixed Martial Arts. T'ai-Chi Ch'uan (Wu Style): Body And Mind In Harmony - The Integration Of Meaning And Method: "For the Western reader this is quite simply the best of the many books on T'ai Chi Ch'uan. - David L. Hall, University of Texas.

Simple stretches you can do anywhere-at your desk, on your couch, or even in your car!

Visit any public park in America in the morning and you'll see them-groups of people of all ages practicing the ancient and beneficial martial art called tai chi. Tai chi has been proven to lower blood pressure, improve fitness, and provide overall relaxation and well-being. Now, it's even easier!

Originally designed for the elderly, these adaptations of traditional tai chi exercises are simple and straightforward while retaining all of the important health benefits of the original movements. You can get fit without exhausting sweaty workouts. And all you need is a chair-no props, no special clothing, no VCR!

- Includes one complete routine and five 15-minute mini-routines. - Special bonus chapter on acupressure points. - Illustrated throughout with line drawings.

This book will appeal to the millions of people who want to start exercising but can't find the time, or who are intimidated by the thought of joining a gym.

- These exercises can be done in the privacy of your home. - Appeals to busy executives as well as homemakers and retired people. - First book of its kind!

Comments (7)

Arashitilar
I have been teaching my seated Tai Chi/Qigong/Yoga exercise program for many years at a senior retirement community. I have a teaching certificate in Yang Tai Chi but I am always seeking more information that could have routines to add to my program. When I saw this volume (Tai Chi in a chair: Easy 15-minute routines for beginners by Cynthia Quarta) for a bargain price on Amazon I purchased it.

This 239 page hardcover book is organized into five chapters. It should be noted that this text does not only cover some of the basic Tai Chi exercises but also explores other esoteric topics such as acupressure’s healing points and other Asian health factors. The first chapter covers how the author developed her seated Tai Chi routines, which interestingly is some of the same reasons I developed this kind of program. The second chapter focuses on the many benefits of practicing seated Tai Chi. Chapter three explains the complete routine. Chapter four shows 6 fifteen-minute daily exercise routines. The final chapter goes into acupressure healing points, whole-body healing points, upper-body healing points, lower-body healing points and relaxation points.

This book also has several illustrations showing the movements; however, like any physical exercise book involving specific kinds of movements a text is limited to what it can actually teach a person without the guidance of a Tai Chi teacher to point the way. This book if used with actual hands on training with a Tai Chi teacher would be the best combination.

Rating: 4 Stars. Joseph J. Truncale (Author: Seated Zen Karate for seniors and the physically challenged).
Kezan
I wholeheartedly agree with On The Path's critique of this book. As a Tai Chi instructor, I am always looking for more resources and teaching techniques. The write up on this book sounded good and the price was very inexpensive. Regardless of the price, I found the content and illustrations were wrong. Not just in one or two instances, but throughout the book. I've added a picture of one of the pages, to give an idea of what I mean. Just working through the exercises, as they are described; then referring to the illustration, created so much confusion and frustration for me, that I could not use it as a resource.
Datrim
With all the 5 star reviews on this book, I was a little disappointed that the most important part of the book - the description of the exercises themselves - was the weakest part. This is really the fault of the editor, not the author, as it is the editor's job to make sure that the writer's intent is expressed in the best way possible. The instructions are generally OK, but some have outright errors in them (i.e., telling you to move your left hand again when it's clear it's time to move the right hand) or poorly clarifying the direction of movement. The instructions for "Repulse Monkey" were so vague - what do you mean when you say "swing your arm back," do you mean vertically or horizontally? - that I finally looked up "Repulse Monkey" on the Internet and found a video of it. Wow. The written description does not explain that exercise well at all!

The illustrations don't help that much either. The illustrations are *nice*, but I'd frankly prefer less shading and detail and have more actual movement shown. Seriously, stick figures would have been better!

The other odd thing is that each exercise has a second description in a different format in the "15-minute exercises" section. Sometimes, in reading both descriptions, you can get a better idea of what the exercise does. (But not all, as in the case of "Repulse Monkey.") The problem with this duplication is that it's not easy to just flip through and get a list of the exercises for the shorter sets.

Still, this is a useful, if flawed resource for teachers and students alike. I would have given it 5 stars if the directions were better. I do plan on using some of these exercises in my chair yoga class. But just be aware that if you buy this book you may need to look some things up on the Internet to understand how everything really works.
Skilkancar
Fourteen years ago, I taught myself Taijiquan (over 3 years) from multiple books of exercise, theory, poems, and whatnot. I used Taiji in daily life, working out for 2 hours 5-7x/week. Then I got married and had kids. Needless to say, I fell out of practice like a bird that stops flapping falls out of the sky.

Recently I have been looking for a "primer" to get me back in the swing of Taiji, since I miss it and its effects (I'm 36 now). I saw this, and for $4 it was a good bargain.

This is excellent. The author discusses an appropriate amount of theory, conceptualization, visualization, and practice, with examples and proof of Taiji's effectiveness.

What you get:
1) Intro to concepts, yin/yang and energy theory, and how Seated T'ai Chi began,
2) The complete set of Taiji,
3) The set broken up into 15-minute "workouts",
4) Centering exercises,
5) Breathing exercises,
6) Healing accupressure points on the body's major energy streams (meridians).

She also includes suggested readings and music at the end of the book.

I rated this book ***** because, if I had had access to this book 14 years ago, I would have been able to cut short my study time by at least a year and a half, for she is American who translated these concepts to an older American culture, one I am more ready to identify with than a Chinese native translating into English (by which my previous collection of Taiji books are authored).

CAVEAT: she uses the traditional language words for the various energy pathways, and does not include pictures for these; also, she strings them together in her introductory explanations. Because I am strangely familiar with the terms, I was able to put together what she meant easily, but a new-comer to Taiji (T'ai Chi) might be dazzled by the onslaught of terminology.

Other than that, the book was excellent. I am using it to relearn what I have forgotten! If you are interested in Taiji (Tai Chi) at all, get this. If anything, it will help you put the pieces together.

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