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by Lydia Davis

  • ISBN: 0374270600
  • Author: Lydia Davis
  • ePub ver: 1612 kb
  • Fb2 ver: 1612 kb
  • Rating: 4.7 of 5
  • Language: English
  • Pages: 752
  • Publisher: Farrar, Straus and Giroux; First Edition edition (September 29, 2009)
  • Formats: doc azw lrf rtf
  • Category: Fiction
  • Subcategory: Short Stories & Anthologies
epub The Collected Stories of Lydia Davis download

The Collected Stories of Lydia Davis. The thirty-four stories in this seminal collection powerfully display what have become Lydia Davis's, brevity, understatement, and surprise.

The Collected Stories of Lydia Davis. A new collection of short stories from the woman Rick Moody has called "the best prose stylist in America".

Also by Lydia Davis NOVEL The End of the Story STORIES Break It Down Almost No Memory Samuel Johnson Is Indignant Varieties of Disturbance SELECTED .

Also by Lydia Davis NOVEL The End of the Story STORIES Break It Down Almost No Memory Samuel Johnson Is Indignant Varieties of Disturbance SELECTED TRANSLATIONS. an imprint of. Penguin books. Published by the Penguin Group. Penguin Books Ltd, 80 Strand, London WC2R 0RL, England. Penguin Group (USA) In. 375 Hudson Street, New York, New York 10014, USA. Penguin Group (Canada), 90 Eglinton Avenue East, Suite 700, Toronto, Ontario, Canada M4P 2Y3 (a division of Pearson Penguin Canada In.

Lydia Davis is one of our most original and influential writers, a storyteller celebrated for her emotional acuity, her formal inventiveness, and her ability to capture the mind in overdrive. She has been called �an American virtuoso of the short story form� (Salon

Lydia Davis is one of our most original and influential writers, a storyteller celebrated for her emotional acuity, her formal inventiveness, and her ability to capture the mind in overdrive. She has been called â?œan American virtuoso of the short story formâ? (Salon. com) and â?œone of the quiet giants. This volume contains all her stories to date, from the acclaimed Break It Down (1986) to the 2007 National Book Award nominee Varieties of Disturbance. The Collected Stories of Lydia Davis is an event in American letters

Lydia Davis is one of our most original and influential writers. Now, for the first time, Davis’s short stories will be collected in one volume, from the groundbreaking Break It Down (1986) to the 2007 National Book Award nominee Varieties of Disturbance.

Lydia Davis is one of our most original and influential writers. She has been called an American virtuoso of the short story form (Salon) and one of the quiet giants. The Collected Stories of Lydia Davis is an event in American letters.

Davis transmutes an amusing annotation into a story that somehow brings the great critic back to life. for a Short Documentary Film, a very short story by Lydia Davis, from The Collected Stories of Lydia Davis – Representatives of different food products manufacturers try to open their own LikeLike.

BREAK IT DOWN (1986). I get home from work and there is a message from him: that he is not coming, that he is busy. BREAK IT DOWN (1986). I wait to hear from him, then at nine o’clock I go to where he lives, find his car, but he’s not home. I knock at his apartment door and then at all the garage doors, not knowing which garage door is his - no answer

Lydia Davis (born July 15, 1947) is an American writer noted for literary works of extreme brevity (commonly called "flash fiction")

Lydia Davis (born July 15, 1947) is an American writer noted for literary works of extreme brevity (commonly called "flash fiction").

Lydia Davis, an American short-story writer, or writer of short texts ambiguously situated between fiction, jeux d'esprit, prose poetry and philosophy, seems to have a similar approach to what she does. Sometimes she takes a word for a walk, as in "Examples of Remember", which reads: Remember that thou art but dust.

бесплатно, без регистрации и без смс. The Collected Stories of Lydia Davis is the complete collection of short fiction from the world-renowned Lydia Davis. WINNER OF THE MAN BOOKER INTERNATIONAL PRIZE 2013'What stories. Precise and piercing, extremely funny. Nearly all are unlike anything you've ever read' Metro'I loved these stories. Excellent' William Leith, Evening Standard'Remarkable. Some of the most moving fiction - on death, marriage, children - of recent years.

Lydia Davis is one of our most original and influential writers. She has been called “an American virtuoso of the short story form” (Salon) and “one of the quiet giants . . . of American fiction” (Los Angeles Times Book Review). Now, for the first time, Davis’s short stories will be collected in one volume, from the groundbreaking Break It Down (1986) to the 2007 National Book Award nominee Varieties of Disturbance. The Collected Stories of Lydia Davis is an event in American letters.

Comments (7)

Kare
There are many defensible reasons for writing reviews on Amazon. One of them is to try to move the needle when you think the average star rating is unjustifiable. I contend there is absolutely no way a score of less than five stars can be justified for Lydia Davis.

Of course many difficult or stylistically advanced writers are frustrating for the unsuspecting reader, particularly writers who haven't the grace to be dead for years and thus enshrined in the pantheon. Nevertheless.

I had read, I am sure, some of her work in the pages of Harpers or the New Yorker, but while possibly amused or charmed I had no idea of the variety and breadth of her imagination, which is part of the dynamic here. In a "story" involving her observations of the new realities imposed by the care of a young baby, she recalls the best of Nicholson Baker's deicious rhapsodies on minutae; some stories resemble Georges Perec, had he possessed a more active sense of humor; still others recall the deadpan absurdism of Beckett. I was initially disappointed to find so many stories written in extremely flat prose until I saw the Beckett tie-in: Davis is ultra-sophisticated, has read everything you have and finds particular comraderie with the flat stylists rather than the baroque movers and practitioners of language. This isn't the night on the town but the morning after.

It's true that not all of these "stories"--I have to use quotes because the term really fails to cover her variety of formats--are winners; what is probably true, though, is that readers will likely disagree as to which fail and which succeed. Entries vary between those of highbrow and lowbrow and nobrow literary heft. Some are one-line notations, others run to 20 pages. One of my favorites was an account of trying to read Beckett's "Worstward Ho" while riding in a van, achieving an absurdist hilarity at once parody, celebration and autobiography that Beckett himself would have appreciated. She is a good mimic; "Kafka Cooks Dinner" is another example. But then there are intense examinations of familial tensions that must themselves be autobiographical, all the more moving for having taken on the dispassionate form of lists or convoluted verbal exercises. As with some of the best authors, she makes language reach into places others haven't touched.

Cutting to the chase, Ms Davis deserves at least five stars here if you value literary innovation, the self-invention and daring of writers who create their own genres, and the value placed on your time by writers who don't waste it. Here's one example in its entirety, from a raft of experiences I can relate to. Keep in mind she is a stylistic chameleon, and the sentence constructions are peculiar to this example only:

How She Could Not Drive

She could not drive if there were too many clouds in the sky. Or rather, if she could drive with many clouds in the sky, she could not have music playing if there were also passengers in the car. If there were two passengers, as well as a small caged animal, and many clouds in the sky, she could listen but not speak. If a wind blew shavings from the small animal's cage over her shoulder and lap as well as the shoulder and lap of the man next to her, she could not speak to anyone or listen, even if there were very few clouds in the sky. If the small boy was quiet, reading his book in the backseat, but the man next to her opened his newspaper so wide that its edge touched the gearshift and the sunlight shone off its white page into her eyes, then she could not speak or listen while trying to enter a large highway full of fast-moving cars, even if there were no clouds in the sky.
Then, if it was night and the boy was not in the car, and the small caged animal was not in the car, and the car was empty of boxes and suitcases where before it had been full, and the man next to her was not reading a newspaper but looking out the window straight ahead, and the sky was dark so that she could see no clouds, she could listen but not talk, and she could have no music playing, if a motel brightly illuminated above her on a dark hill some distance ahead and to the left seemed to be floating across the highway in front as she drove at high speed between dotted lines with headlights coming at her on the left and up behind her in the rearview mirror and taillights ahead in a gentle curve around to the right underneath the massive airship of motel lights floating across the highway from left to right in front of her, or could talk, but only to say one thing, which went unanswered.

By the way, this particular book, as a physical entity, is a joy to hold: lightweight for its 733 pages, a tidy block of woodpulp only 4 1/2 by 7". Yet with readable type, since ultra-short entries involve a lot of blank space. And there's a pleasant salmon-colored cover. Get the physical book if you can.
Yayrel
To say she's an original is to beg the question, there's no such thing as an original, and I think that Ms. Davis would appreciate that. The mystery of it all, the mystery of life, love, death, longing, loneliness, conflict, obscurity, etc., although there' not much happiness here. The existential dilemma she captures, what is life, what are people, what the hell is anything all about. Well she's here to tell you and it's not much but she pulls the covers off the bed to reveal the corpse of life, she has nothing much to say and that's the point, the less is more she achieves so brilliantly and so easily although with surgical precision like an autopsy peeling off layer after layer, down to the bone, and than what's left nothing and that's whats so wonderful about all these "pieces." She gets to the core of the meaningless meaning of life and it's not much but that's the point. These are brilliant, courageous, take no prisoners works of art. Don't read them at your peril.
Mavegelv
this woman is a master. She recognizes subtle nuances with people - ironies, events, situations and tells them in short story format. Brilliant. What she can reveal in a half page is absolute natural genius. my copy of this is so worn out from reading over and again and seeing new things everytime. Be aware it's not for everyone.
kolos
I'm giving it five stars because it is the complete work of an author many consider the best in the genre -- micro fiction. I find her work unreadable mostly, but so many people I respect love her that I'm willing to accept it's my problem, not her's. Maybe it'll grow on me over time. It's serious work, and gives a lot to chew on in a very short space each time.
Nikohn
I'll start with the physicality of this book as it is so lovely...textures, typeface, edges of the pages and such a tender coral tone.
Such space....hummm to breathe, and such succinct honed stories that capture the essence of a moment ,a human thought, a disgrace.
Some books ask us to be lost in another's tale....in this book you end up startled that somehow, what you just read, has so much to do with you
& you marvel at how witty you can be.
Arith
Bought this for a gift. I wanted to share one particular story. The other stories were interesting and the recipient is a prodigious reader so they will most likely enjoy the entire book. This particular book was a bit small compared to a similar softcover paperback version in a book store. I wish it had been the larger book.
Mezilabar
Lydia Davis is not the type of author I normally read. However, after reading her profile in the New Yorker, I was excited to find this book. It was discounted for a day through the Kindle program.

I haven't finished reading all of the stories, but I've been enjoying the book very much. I take time to think about each story -- how well they're edited, how I respond. I can tell that Ms. Davis has mastered this craft, and I'm excited to start enjoying this type of work.
The stories are well crafted and relate an interesting message that can be interpreted many ways. The stories are rich with human feel I r's and actions.

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