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by Dorothy Stephens,Abraham Stoll,Edmund Spenser

  • ISBN: 0872208559
  • Author: Dorothy Stephens,Abraham Stoll,Edmund Spenser
  • ePub ver: 1630 kb
  • Fb2 ver: 1630 kb
  • Rating: 4.4 of 5
  • Language: English
  • Pages: 496
  • Publisher: Hackett Publishing Company, Inc. (November 30, 2006)
  • Formats: lit doc rtf doc
  • Category: Fiction
  • Subcategory: Poetry
epub The Faerie Queene, Books Three and Four (Bk. 3  4) download

Only 13 left in stock (more on the way). I also agree that I would have preferred separate volumes for Books Three and Four, though since most of the storylines are common to both books I understand why some readers undertaking just those two books would prefer to have them bound together. Perhaps economics was a factor: Book Four, despite its merits, is the book least suited to being read by itself and might not have sold well on its ow.

The Faerie Queene, Book Six and the Mutabilitie Cantos Edmund Spenser,Abraham Stoll,Andrew Hadfield Sınırlı önizleme - 1914.

Books one and five (two, three, and four are coming later-figure that one out) of Spenser's opus get the red-carpet treatment Tam incelemeyi okuyun. The Faerie Queene, Book Six and the Mutabilitie Cantos Edmund Spenser,Abraham Stoll,Andrew Hadfield Sınırlı önizleme - 1914. The Faerie Queene, Book One Edmund Spenser,Carol V. Kaske Sınırlı önizleme - 1909. Tümünü görüntüle . Sık kullanılan terimler ve kelime öbekleri.

I grant that some of the footnotes were informative and appreciated. However, way too many of the footnotes contained lewd sexual references: one such note using the cun word.

Books one and five (two, three, and four are coming later-figure that one out) of Spenser's opus get the red-carpet treatment. The Faerie Queene Book Four. 245. The Letter to Raleigh. 451. The Life of Edmund Spenser.

Books one and five (two, three, and four are coming later-figure that one out) of Spenser's opus get the red-carpet treatment Читать весь отзыв. Books one and five (two, three, and four are coming later-figure that one out) of Spenser's opus get the red-carpet treatment Читать весь отзыв.

Book Five of The Faerie Queene is Spenser's Legend of Justice. It tells of the knight Artegall's efforts to rid Faerie Land of tyranny and injustice, aided by his sidekick Talus and the timely intervention of his betrothed, the woman warrior Britomart. Book Five of The Faerie Queene is Spenser's Legend of Justice. As allegory, Book Five figures forth ideal concepts of justice and explores how justice may be applied in a real world complicated by social inequality, female rule, political guile, and excessive violence.

Edmund Spenser, Dorothy Stephens, Abraham Stoll. While on this quest, she seeks to understand how one can be chaste while pursuing a sexual goal, in love with a man while passionately attached to a woman, a warrior princess yet a wife.

BOOKS I AND II of The Faerie Queene: THE MUTABILITY CANTOS and Selections from THE MINOR POETRY.

The Faerie Queene: Book One. Edmund Spenser. BOOKS I AND II of The Faerie Queene: THE MUTABILITY CANTOS and Selections from THE MINOR POETRY.

and name symbolism (matters increasingly foreign to our undergraduates) than almost all previous versions. -Catherine Gimelli Martin, Studies in English Literature 1500-1900

The Faerie Queene from Hackett Publishing Company: Spenser's great work in five volumes

Stephens's introduction to books 3 and 4 a guide to approaching the poem's grammar and syntax, meter, and significant theme's as well as a list of possible questions for discussion based on issues addressed in recent criticism. The Faerie Queene from Hackett Publishing Company: Spenser's great work in five volumes. Each includes its own Introduction, annotation, notes on the text, bibliography, glossary, and index of characters; Spenser's "Letter to Raleigh" and a short Life of Edmund Spenser appear in every volume.

These paired Arthurian legends suggest that erotic desire and the desire for companionship undergird national politics. The maiden Britomart, Queen Elizabeth's fictional ancestor, dons armor to search for a man whom she has seen in a crystal ball. While on this quest, she seeks to understand how one can be chaste while pursuing a sexual goal, in love with a man while passionately attached to a woman, a warrior princess yet a wife. As Spenser's most sensitively developed character, Britomart is capable of heroic deeds but also of teenage self-pity. Her experience is anatomized in the stories of other characters, where versions of love and friendship include physical gratification, torture, mutual aid, competition, spiritual ecstasy, self-sacrifice, genial teasing, jealousy, abduction, wise government, sedition, and the valiant defense of a pig shed.

Comments (4)

Yramede
Interesting how this is the book which is supposed to teach the reader of chastity. Certainly, it has its moments when the message comes through loud and clear, but the many footnotes which indicate word play and double meanings sometimes make it clear that there are nasty meanings to the verse. All in all, a difficult but rewarding read.

This story takes place in a fantasy land, with certain characters who must learn about chastity. The original purpose, as stated by Spenser himself, is to teach the reader how to behave chastely. With the numerous situations which can be read as unchaste, it is a wonder the reader can get the intended meaning of the author. But along the way, it has some hilarious moments (the idea of Britomart within Castle Joyeous at the dinner table in full armor including visor comes to mind). I found the book refreshing and entertaining, with several laugh out loud situations.
Black_Hawk_Down.
This edition of Spenser's Faerie Queene is finely edited. Very informative and thorough, lodging multiple perspectives on critical passages that are often overlooked.
Throw her heart
In every study edition of a classic work, nearly every reader will find some editorial choices that please and some that displease. Since each of the five volumes of the Hackett "Faerie Queene" has its own editor, the features that please and displease any given reader vary from volume to volume. I have to agree with the reviewer who observed that Dorothy Stephens' footnotes sometimes stray from straightforward basic information into unnecessary commentary: instead of simply explaining the meaning of a word or phrase or custom or allusion, she wants to draw the reader into pondering more involved and speculative interpretations. She certainly doesn't do this constantly, however, and most of her attempts to stimulate classroom colloquy from the bottom of the page strike me as pedagogically sound, even if arguably out of place in this edition. To my mind, in fact, this is the best-edited volume of the Hackett set. For the most part Stephens seems to have in mind an already-sophisticated student of literature who is nonetheless completely new to Spenser, and she manages to be simultaneously informative, provocative, and inviting on a wide variety of issues.

I also agree that I would have preferred separate volumes for Books Three and Four, though since most of the storylines are common to both books I understand why some readers undertaking just those two books would prefer to have them bound together. (Perhaps economics was a factor: Book Four, despite its merits, is the book least suited to being read by itself and might not have sold well on its own.) If only Amazon would make the all-five-volumes-in-one e-book (which already exists) available for Kindle, one could get the entire set "bound together" within the amazingly compact dimensions of a tablet or e-reader.
Mozel
I bought the new Hackett editions of the Faerie Queen because I loved the idea of having separate volumes for each of the books. It's a shame they decided to put books three and four in one volume. It's more of a shame that they let this hack write the notes for that volume. The notes are typically either pointlessly obvious or some nonsense masquerading as criticism. In particular, there's no end in the notes of the editor trying to make Spenser into a proto gay rights activist, which is highly unlikely.

If you like the Faerie Queen, pick the Hacket editions up, but skip the notes in this one. If you've never read the Faerie Queene, don't bother with this one--get the Penguin Classics edition instead. That edition has endnotes instead of footnotes, which can be annoying, but at least you won't have so much tripe on the page tempting you to look away from the poem itself.

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