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by Alexander Pushkin

  • ISBN: 0465020941
  • Author: Alexander Pushkin
  • ePub ver: 1881 kb
  • Fb2 ver: 1881 kb
  • Rating: 4.7 of 5
  • Language: English
  • Pages: 208
  • Publisher: Basic Books; 1st edition (September 11, 2000)
  • Formats: lit lrf mobi doc
  • Category: Fiction
  • Subcategory: Poetry
epub Eugene Onegin: A Novel In Verse download

Eugene Onegin: A Novel I. .has been added to your Cart. little to nothing about Pushkin's life and career.

Eugene Onegin: A Novel I. and a lengthy, comprehensive series of notes on all the works in the volume; these notes are good for the student of Russian literature or history, though a little tedious for the general reader.

On 4 November 1823 Pushkin wrote to a friend, Prince Vyazemsky, from Odessa: ‘I am writing now not a novel, but a novel in verse – the devil of a difference.

Translated with an Introduction and Notes by. Stanley mitchell. Published by the Penguin Group. Penguin Books Ltd, 80 Strand, London WC2R 0RL, England. On 4 November 1823 Pushkin wrote to a friend, Prince Vyazemsky, from Odessa: ‘I am writing now not a novel, but a novel in verse – the devil of a difference. Som. ething like Don Juan – there’s no point in thinking about publication; I’m writing whatever comes into my head. 2 Odessa was Pushkin’s second place of exile after Kishinev, in Bessarabia.

The hero of my novel, without preambles, forthwith, 8 I'd like to have you meet: Onegin, a good pal of mine . My Eugene, a second, being afraid of jealous censures, was in his dress a pedant.

The hero of my novel, without preambles, forthwith, 8 I'd like to have you meet: Onegin, a good pal of mine, was born upon the Neva's banks, where maybe you were born . 8 and what we've called a fop. Three hours, at least

During this so-called ‘southern exile’, he composed several narrative poems and began his novel in verse, Eugene Onegm

ALEXANDER SERGEEVICH PUSHKIN was born in Moscow in 1799 into an old aristocratic family. As a schoolboy he demonstrated a precocious talent for verse and was recognized as a poetic prodigy by prominent older writers. During this so-called ‘southern exile’, he composed several narrative poems and began his novel in verse, Eugene Onegm. As a result of further conflicts with state authorities he was condemned to a new period of exile at his family’s estate of Mikhailovskoe. There he wrote some of his finest lyric poetry, completed his verse drama Boris Godunov, and continued work on Eugene Onegin.

ALEXANDER SERGEYEVICH PUSHKIN was born in Moscow in 1799. Translated with an Introduction and Notes by STANLEY MITCHELL. He was liberally educated and left school in 1817. Given a sinecure in the Foreign Office, he spent three dissipated years in St Petersburg writing light, erotic and highly polished verse. He flirted with several pre-Decembrist societies, composing the mildly revolutionary verses which led to his disgrace and exile in 1820.

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Eugene Onegin" is the master work of the poet whom Russians regard as the fountainhead of their literature. Set in 1820s imperial Russia, Pushkin's novel in verse follows the emotions and destiny of three men - Onegin the bored fop, Lensky the minor elegiast, and a stylized Pushkin himself - and the fates and affections of three women - Tatyana the provincial beauty, her sister Olga, and Pushkin's mercurial Muse. Серия: "Oxford World's Classics". Eugene Onegin" is the master work of the poet whom Russians regard as the fountainhead of their literature

Eugene Onegin is a novel in verse written by Alexander Pushkin. Onegin is considered a classic of Russian literature, and its eponymous protagonist has served as the model for a number of Russian literary heroes (so-called superfluous men)

Eugene Onegin is a novel in verse written by Alexander Pushkin. Onegin is considered a classic of Russian literature, and its eponymous protagonist has served as the model for a number of Russian literary heroes (so-called superfluous men). It was published in serial form between 1825 and 1832.

Eugene Onegin is a novel written in verse, and is one of the most influential works of Pushkin in particular and for Russian literature in general. The main character, Eugene Onegin, a fashionable dandy is forced to leave St Petersburg and visit his uncle in a village. One of the local girls, a daughter of a landowner brought up on romantic novels, falls in love with him. Despite seeming to be a simple love story, the novel paints a concise picture of Pushkin’s times. It’s an encyclopaedic work that touches upon all aspects of society.

Translated with an Introduction and Notes by JAMES E. FALEN. Alexander Pushkin (1799-1837) is the poet and writer whom Russians regard as both the source and the summit of their literature. James . alen 1990, 1995. Not only is he revered, like Shakespeare in the English tradition or Goethe in the German, as the supreme national poet, but he has become a kind of cultural myth, an iconic figure around whom a veritable cult of idolatry has been fashioned.

Fans of Hofstadter's Le Ton beau de Marot will be delighted to see his meticulous theories of translation put into practice in what seems destined to become the definitive English-language version of Eugene Onegin. It is sure to bring new and deserving readers to this neglected literary jewel.
Comments (7)

I am hcv men
For anyone who has read Le Ton Beau de Marot, this book is a must buy, if only for the introduction which fills in the background of how this translation came to be written. For readers of Hofstadter, it will also be fun to read Pushkin with clear Hofstadter twists, as his style pokes through time and time again. For those interested in a good read of the original, however, the translation of James Falen is the way to go (as Hofstadter himself writes). This one is quirky and playful, which makes for an enjoyable read, but does not attempt to match Falen in terms of faithfully reproducing the original.
Zonama
Hofstadter's preface is an intriguing love story by a master of symbols and patterns who falls prey to compulsiveness and pounces on random coincidences. He gives in to love-for the poem, if only for the love of his wife, Carol. The question that anyone familiar with Hofstadter is; is this book Carol's symbol, his deceased wife living beyond her mortality? Ironically, the story line by the original author Sergeevich Pushkin, the godfather of Russian literature, is a love story as well. Hence you'll find two parallel themes in my review. First is the answer to the Hofstadter question. The second is a question to all of you. Pushkin's love story told in poetry is one of familiar refrain. I suspect love manifests itself in many ways and thrives on many different levels..

In Hofstadter's book I Am a Strange Loop, discussed in my review found here on Cigar Room of Books, he tells a touching true-life story of his wife's passing. In that story he eventually climbs out of the funk he found himself in. This translation project was his bridge. He provides a rationale of how the entwined life between himself and Carol became an entwined thought pattern. Thought being capable of transcending modalities, allows is wife Carol to live on through the people she was close to, and then through generations. In piecing together the story in Strange Loop and his preface in this book, I have come to conclude that the hidden power of love drove Hofstadter, to this project so that he could he could release his grief and find a higher plane to express his love for Carol. The most remarkable feat I this book is Hofstadter, already fluent in a few languages which are mere symbols of thought, flowing from the patterns of DNA, he translates a poem written in Russian, a language he is not fluent in by the most renowned Russian author ever and receives high accolades from Russians who say he captured the pure essence of Pushkin's heart and mind.

You find evidence in chapter 7 verse 23: to my summation...to read on, please do a keyword search for my blog using cigarroomofbooks.blogspot. There you find the evidence and my reaction to Hofstadter and Pushkin
Clodebd
good read
Forey
MY OWN CLEver words for enjoyment
Of this Onegin, let me share.
For Douglas 'twas more than employment
This short tale, so simple, so bare.
Doug took time for this rendition
He used well his famed erudition;
He polished his verse, the rhymes all matched,
Though some lines were long to be hatched.
Above all, Pushkin's quick clever
Wit shines through from his age to ours.
Such fun reading it was, I never
Felt I had wasted those hours.
All in all I think this book fine
And as Doug ends his lines, I mine.
Whitegrove
Eugene Onegin is the pinnacle of Russian literature. This hundred-page poem is embedded in Russian brains. Imagine high school nerds repeating the "dead parrot" skit from Monty Python. Now imagine that for all Python skits, the whole population could do that. Eugene Onegin is ubiquitous in Russia. A tale of love and longing, fair maid Tatyana pursues her Romeo. "Romeo" is named Eugene Onegin and he is a decent enough playboy prince. The story is classic, particularly the sections of dialog between Tatyana and Eugene. School children should study their exchanges, which would fit neatly into a forty-minute class. Perhaps, in doing so, literature would score rare points over "Malcolm in the Middle". I read this poem out of admiration for Hofstadter, the translator, a cognitive scientist, Pulitzer Prize winner and all around Einstein. "Godel, Escher, Bach" (1979) earned Hofstadter immortality at a young age. If you wish to think deeply, let Hofstadter guide you with his science and philosophy. Hofstadter claims the definitive translation of Eugene Onegin is that of James Fallen. Thus, Hofstadter was liberated to translate liberally and with personal pinache. Admittedly, I haven't memorized the stanzas, so perhaps something was lost in translation. Nonetheless, I'll guarantee that you will finish this poem if you make it half way through. Shakespeare himself would not complain at losing a few days of English instruction to Russia's Pushkin, as the conclusion brings a smile to the dead.
Inertedub
Sure, Pushkin had fun with his Russian, and why shouldn't a translator carry that playfulness into his translation. But damn, I found it way too distracting. The introduction by Hofstadter was very interesting and conveyed his love and dedication to this novel; my hopes were high for an enjoyable ride. But I found the novel too dificult to follow, and the clever translation distracting. Hofstadter himself recommends a translation by Falen, and I concur, finding it much easier to follow.

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