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epub Humid Pitch: Narrative Poetry download

by Cheryl Clarke

  • ISBN: 0932379664
  • Author: Cheryl Clarke
  • ePub ver: 1997 kb
  • Fb2 ver: 1997 kb
  • Rating: 4.1 of 5
  • Language: English
  • Pages: 129
  • Publisher: Firebrand Books; First Edition edition (October 1, 1989)
  • Formats: mobi txt rtf azw
  • Category: Fiction
  • Subcategory: Poetry
epub Humid Pitch: Narrative Poetry download

Humid pitch : narrative poetry. by. Clarke, Cheryl, 1947-. Books for People with Print Disabilities.

Humid pitch : narrative poetry. Internet Archive Books.

Cheryl Clarke, Humid Pitch: Narrative Poetry (Firebrand Books, 1989). You can versify narratively all day and well into the night in formal verse (and, for example, William Morris, who was infamous for writing some five thousand lines a day, did just that) and never worry that your work will be mistaken for prose if someone takes Cheryl Clarke, Humid Pitch: Narrative Poetry (Firebrand Books, 1989).

Cheryl L. Clarke (born Washington DC, May 16, 1947) is a lesbian poet, essayist, educator and a Black feminist community activist: she lives in Jersey City, New Jersey, and Hobart, New York

Cheryl L. Clarke (born Washington DC, May 16, 1947) is a lesbian poet, essayist, educator and a Black feminist community activist: she lives in Jersey City, New Jersey, and Hobart, New York. With her life partner, Barbara Balliet, she is co-owner of Bleinheim Hill Books, a used and rare bookstore in Hobart. Her younger sister is novelist Breena Clarke, with whom Clarke and Balliet organize the Hobart Festival of Women writers each summer.

Poems deal with childhood, the past, exile, art, sisters, music, identity, and school. Publisher:Firebrand Books. ISBN13:9780932379665. Release Date:October 1989. 40 lbs. Dimensions:0. African-American Studies Gay & Lesbian Literature & Fiction Poetry Politics & Social Sciences Social Sciences Sociology Specific Demographics.

Poet, critic, and activist Cheryl Clarke was born in Washington, D.

Poet, critic, and activist Cheryl Clarke was born in Washington, DC. She earned her BA from Howard University and her MA and PhD from Rutgers University. She wrote the critical study After Mecca : Women Poets and the Black Arts Movement (2005), and a volume collecting her poetry and prose was published as The Days of Good Looks: Prose and Poetry of Cheryl Clarke, 1980–2005 (2006). Tell us if something is incorrect. This button opens a dialog that displays additional images for this product with the option to zoom in or out. Humid Pitch : Narrative Poetry.

com's Cheryl Clarke Page and shop for all Cheryl Clarke books. Check out pictures, bibliography, and biography of Cheryl Clarke.

ISBN 10: 0932379664 ISBN 13: 9780932379665. Publisher: Firebrand Books, 1989. Poems deal with childhood, the past, exile, art, sisters, music, identity, and school.

Information about the book, Humid Pitch: Narrative Poetry: the Poetry, Hardcover, by Cheryl Clarke (Firebrand Books, Dec 01, 1989) . Tell us what do you think about Humid Pitch: Narrative Poetry.

Her books of poetry include By My Precise Haircut (The Word Works Press, 2016); Experimental Love (Firebrand Books, 1993), which was nominated for a 1994 Lambda Literary Award; Humid Pitch (1989); Living as a Lesbian (1986); and Narratives: Poems in the Tradition of Black Women (1983).

Poems deal with childhood, the past, exile, art, sisters, music, identity, and school
Comments (3)

Weetont
Just got my own copy of a volume I already loved, and it's hard to believe I'm just the third person to review this beautiful work on Amazon. I agree with everything in the positive review. To the negative reviewer I would just say that even in my undergrad lit classes we discussed poetic subtleties like near-rhyme, alliteration, repetition, sound values and imagery, contributions to poetry outside traditional forms. There is so much poetry here. From the opening lines of Epic of Song:

This is a long-telling song,
telling of us as we once were.
Some device. Some history.
Some mystery. Some misery.
Some form needing to be form.

To me, Epic of Song reads like a tribute to Bessie Smith and Ma Rainey, but that might just be me. Without knowing what the poet actually had in mind, I love this sweet, erotic, bluesy piece. That alone is enough to recommend this poet, but every poem in the volume reaches me. Praise from greats like Gwendolyn Brooks and Audre Lorde on the back of the book speaks louder than I can. A beautiful collection of woman-centered poetry with echoes of the blues and jazz throughout. Like most good poetry collections, a second and third reading will help you get out of it even more of what the poet put in. So worth the time!
Alsantrius
In "Humid Pitch," African-American poet Cheryl Clarke creates a rich collection of narrative poems that tell the lives of a variety of women. As in Clarke's other books, a major emphasis is on the lives and loves of Black lesbians. Sensuous, earthy, and grounded in the vernacular speech of African-Americans, "Humid Pitch" is an excellent example of Clarke's poetic vision.
More than half of the book consists of Clarke's multi-part masterpiece entitled "Epic of Song." This extended narrative poem tells the story of Mourning Star Blue, a rural Black girl who joins a traveling troupe of performers led by Mean Candy Sweat, an imperious diva. A stunning exploration of eroticism and the artistic spirit, "Epic of Song" is a remarkable achievement.
The many shorter narratives which complete this collection introduce the reader to a variety of fascinating characters, including an escaped slave girl ("Bulletin"), a single mother during the Depression ("Ella Takes up the Slack,") and "a black nun in a white order" ("Frances Michael"). Clarke boldly travels through time and her poet's voice never falters.
"Humid Pitch" is a companion volume, in both style and themes, to Clarke's earlier book, "Narratives: Poems in the Tradition of Black Women." But whether or not you have read that book, check out "Humid Pitch."
Doomblade
Cheryl Clarke, <strong>Humid Pitch: Narrative Poetry</strong> (Firebrand Books, 1989)

This book is quite possibly the best ammunition I've ever seen for something I have long hypothesized: that free verse narrative is well-nigh impossible to do correctly. You can versify narratively all day and well into the night in formal verse (and, for example, William Morris, who was infamous for writing some five thousand lines a day, did just that) and never worry that your work will be mistaken for prose if someone takes out the line breaks. After all, you have rhythm and rhyme to fall back on, which notifies the reader right quick that it's poetry, no matter how it's presented. And the longer a free-verse narrative piece goes on, I think, the more likely it is that it will eventually degenerate into prose with extra line breaks. Don't believe me? Assuming you've never read "Epic of Song", the eighty-page narrative piece at the center of <em>Humid Pitch</em>, see if you can figure out where the line breaks go:

"The show ended early. Candy was the last one to leave the stage. She was shivering and her eyes running. Tears or mucus? Star gave her her coat. Candy seemed to keep a cold. Her clothes wasn't tight no more. She walked slowly ahead of her entourage, switching her hips, that switching which Star loved even though some of its snap was gone now." (73)

Four lines when I type it here, and it's passable prose, though it could use a touch-up here and there ("Star gave her her coat" could use a bit of clarification, and the first part being short declarative then short declarative then short declarative then short question then short declarative then... gets a little repetitive). But what's poetic about it? What about it says "this should be sixteen lines of poetry" rather than "this should be four lines of prose"? I don't think that question gets asked nearly enough by poets today, and it's one of the most important a poet can ask. **

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