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by Linda Gregerson

  • ISBN: 0395822904
  • Author: Linda Gregerson
  • ePub ver: 1805 kb
  • Fb2 ver: 1805 kb
  • Rating: 4.9 of 5
  • Language: English
  • Pages: 77
  • Publisher: Houghton Mifflin; First Edition edition (November 4, 1996)
  • Formats: docx lrf lit lrf
  • Category: Fiction
  • Subcategory: Poetry
epub The Woman Who Died in Her Sleep download

Linda Gregerson writes with a quiet power and a subtle musicality about perseverance, suffering, grace, and . You wake to death, literally or here, as a reader, become intensely aware of it, or die in your sleep, unaware and "unremarked". 11 people found this helpful.

Linda Gregerson writes with a quiet power and a subtle musicality about perseverance, suffering, grace, and hope in the face of disease and mortality. Mark Strand calls her work "among the very best being written. In "The Resurrection of the Body," Gregerson paints a scene of love and determination at her child's physical therapy clinic.

Linda Gregerson on the presentation of her book "Breathing machines" at the club "Peroto", National Palace of Culture, Sofia. The Woman Who Died in Her Sleep (1996). Waterborne (Houghton Mifflin, 2002). Linda Gregerson (born August 5, 1950) is an American poet and member of faculty at the University of Michigan Contents. Magnetic North (Houghton Mifflin, 2007).

Linda Gregerson is an American poet and member of faculty at the University of Michigan. from the University of Iowa Writers Workshop. In 2014, she was named as a Chancellor of the Academy of American Poets. Linda Gregerson is the author of several collections of poetry and literary criticism. Kingsley Tufts Poetry Award for Waterborne Lenore Marshall Poetry Prize finalist for The Woman Who Died in Her Sleep 2000 Guggenheim Fellowship National Book Award finalist for Manetic North.

Boston : Houghton Mifflin. inlibrary; printdisabled; ; china. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books. Gutierres on October 17, 2011. SIMILAR ITEMS (based on metadata).

Among her earlier books, Magnetic North (2007) was a finalist for the National Book Award; Waterborne (2002) won the Kingsley Tufts Poetry Award; The Woman Who Died in Her Sleep was a finalist for both the Lenore Marshall Award and The Poets Prize. Gregerson has also received awards from the American Academy of Arts and Letters, the Poetry Society of America, the Modern Poetry Association, the Guggenheim Foundation, and the National Endowment for the Arts.

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The woman who died in her sleep. Are you sure you want to remove The woman who died in her sleep from your list? The woman who died in her sleep. Published 1996 by Houghton Mifflin in Boston.

Linda Gregerson, An Arbor from The Woman Who Died in Her Sleep. A Renaissance scholar, a classically trained actor, and a devotee of the sciences, Gregerson produces lyrical poems informed by her expansive reading that are inquisitive, unflinching, and tender. Reprinted with the permission of Houghton Mifflin Company. Source: The Woman Who Died in Her Sleep (Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, 1996). Previous in Issue Next in Issue. A Renaissance scholar, a classically trained actor, and a devotee of the sciences, Gregerson produces lyrical poems informed by her expansive reading that are inquisitive, unflinching, and tender Read Full Biography. More About this Poet.

Linda Gregerson - Linda Gregerson’s book Waterborne won the Kingsley Tufts Poetry Prize, and her book The Woman Who Died in Her . In 2015, Gregerson was elected a Chancellor of the Academy of American Poets

Linda Gregerson - Linda Gregerson’s book Waterborne won the Kingsley Tufts Poetry Prize, and her book The Woman Who Died in Her Sleep was . .In 2015, Gregerson was elected a Chancellor of the Academy of American Poets. She teaches American poetry and Renaissance literature at the University of Michigan, where she also directs the MFA program in creative writing. She lives with her husband and two daughters in Ann Arbor, Michigan. Selected Bibliography.

Her books of poetry include Magnetic North (Houghton Mifflin, 2007), Waterborne (Houghton Mifflin, 2002), The Woman Who Died in.

Her books of poetry include Magnetic North (Houghton Mifflin, 2007), Waterborne (Houghton Mifflin, 2002), The Woman Who Died in Her Sleep (1996), an. literature - /lit euhr euh cheuhr, choor, li treuh /, n. 1. writings in which expression and form, in connection with ideas of permanent and universal interest, are characteristic or essential features, as poetry, novels, history, biography, and essays.

jpg Linda Gregerson (born August 5, 1950) is an American poet and member of faculty at the University of Michigan. Lenore Marshall Poetry Prize finalist for The Woman Who Died in Her Sleep. Levinson Prize from Poetry magazine. Consuelo Ford Award from the Poetry Society of America. Isabel MacCaffrey Award from the Spenser Society of America. 2000 Guggenheim Fellowship.

This is the second book of poems by a powerful, compassionate, and fiercely intelligent poet who writes about the boundaries between life and death, sickness and health, body and spirit. Gregerson's theme is our formidable encounter with mortality - the assaults of disease and bodily harm, the gradations of material and psychic well-being, domestic treachery, self-slaughter, failures of mind. Her emphasis is always on the resourcefulness of the human spirit, the intelligence of the body, the abundant loveliness of the created world. What readers will love about these poems - many of them centered on young children - is their combination of straightforwardness and complexity. Linda Gregerson is not an ordinary believer, but the rhythms and icons of faith pervade her work. Readers will also relish the music of Gregerson's poems and the remarkable use of line breaks and patterns on the page, which give her poems aesthetic as well as moral authority. These are not light verses, far from it
Comments (4)

Urtte
This poetry is harrowingly beautiful. It is painful to contemplate. It is relentless in its message.
Do not turn away from this book though-you will grow within its boundaries, and you will be sadly wiser. And most of all, you will have lived within a world of finely wrought language. In Gregerson's terms, she has sutured these poems together to yield a whole.
One need only to examine the title of the collection and the titles of the individual poems to know very quickly that the reader had better be prepared to encounter fear and pain and disillusionment: The Bad Physician, Bad Blood, Mother Ruin, Target, Bleedthrough, and on. Even those titles that appear harmless on the surface are tinged with a terrible irony. "Safe" for example, is far from it.
Let's look at this poem more closely to give the flavor of the book-it is unwavering. It is a poem that recounts the murder of a friend by a burglar. It is about the young daughter left behind and in the narrator's care. It is about the inexplicable-death without reason-and our utter lack of safety within this world-the world of man and the world of nature (the world of God is in here as well, but I'm not sure where to place it-but it is present on nearly every page).
The poem has three parts and yields to three lasting images: the repair of the woman's flesh on the operating table (useless, as the poem's dedication makes clear-there is no salvation in these poems); the child who is left, a baby, juxtaposed to the "child" that commits the murder ("And the nineteen-year-old burglar...he must have been harmless once"); and the house that should be mother and daughter's protection from the world (from another poem dealing with political ideology-"This isn't the shelter we thought we'd/bought"). Gregerson's surgeon stitches in part I and in part II the young girl's "miraculous breath//moves into her lungs and, stitch/by mortal/stitch, moves out." And that is beautifully composed, but so heavy with mortality, so heavy with poignancy (the phrase begins with "Friend, her cheek is fresh as hope/of paradise"). That is what you get in all of Gregerson's poems. The ignorance of youth (paradise) that will be quickly displaced by "real" life.
"What is this human desire//for children? They just make a bigger/target/for the anger of the gods." Gregerson's gods are very angry indeed, and vengeful.
And, what must be the poet's nearest truth of the writing self: referring to a child who loves to swing high and dare the devil in every giddy, joyous action, "Some children are like that,/I have one/ myself, no wonder we never leave them alone,//we who have no talent for pleasure/nor use/for the body but after the fact." The even deeper truth we're forced to see here is that that very child, any child, every child will suffer sexual abuse, chemical death, the murder of a parent, the indifference and abuse by "loved ones", and birth defects ("God's wounds").
"The fault's in nature, who will//without system or explanation/make permanent/havoc of little mistakes."
"one night a woman came home to her house/and locked its useless/locks, and buttoned her night dress and read//for a while, and slept till she was wakened."
You wake to death, literally or here, as a reader, become intensely aware of it, or die in your sleep, unaware and "unremarked".
Faegal
This book is a mountain over clouds. Linda Gregorson moves deeply into the heart & mind where embrace becomes faith, completely unflinching, but not religious. She's always very aware of the reader in these poems, to the point of bringing this to the forefront & making the reader a deeply emotionally connected character, making it clear that the reader is who she is addressing, not her daughter, in a poem that says "Have I told you - do you know for yourself - how the sweetness of creation may be summed up by the lightfall on a young girl's cheek?"
Throughout the book she gives her thoughts & feelings to the reader as alpine air gives dew to grass. & how she gives the music. These poems resonate with music that is the spine of poetic music, constantly - in the spine of the stanzas, the middle line in stanzas of 3 - reducing themselves to unimeter or sometimes even reducing to a single syllable, as her masterfully, brilliantly crafted free-verse seems to come from a clean foundation of the iamb but more recently the musical independence of the solitary syllable.
This book also holds very powerful themes in the way that one thoughtfully holds one's robe in pre-dawn mist. Here are classic & personal themes & one very moving poem communicating human rights violations, which are a thing that in this world must be addressed with poetry & everyday life. Linda Gregerson does not shy from or ever stumble in trying to reach what she has to say. Linda Gregerson says exactly what she has to say.
Malann
Linda Gregerson's book of poetry is by far the best book of poetry I've read all year. The passion and delicacy in which she writes is one that I have never seen before. Every word she chooses is harrowing and necessary. I've never read a book of poetry faster and have never finished a book of poetry wanting more poems as I did with Linda's book. A must read.
cyrexoff
Gregerson isn't easy to read but I do like her sensibility.

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