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epub A Song for Satawal download

by Kenneth Brower

  • ISBN: 0140070419
  • Author: Kenneth Brower
  • ePub ver: 1155 kb
  • Fb2 ver: 1155 kb
  • Rating: 4.6 of 5
  • Language: English
  • Pages: 218
  • Publisher: Penguin Books (May 1, 1984)
  • Formats: doc lit doc mbr
  • Category: Fiction
epub A Song for Satawal download

This book is just as good. I purchased a well-aged copy after reading the obituary in 2010 of Mau Piailug in the Economist

This book is just as good. I purchased a well-aged copy after reading the obituary in 2010 of Mau Piailug in the Economist. Mau, from the island of Satawal in the Carolines, was the navigator on the Hokulea, the canoe that sailed without any modern navigation aids from Hawaii to Tahiti in 1976, sparking revival of the indigenous Pacific voyaging culture.

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This scarce antiquarian book is a facsimile reprint of the original. A SONG FOR SATAWAL is a lyrical portrait of science and sorcery in Micronesia, outrigger canoes steered by starlight, monitor lizards, tattooed grandmothers, Yapese crazies, and ghosts.

This small place Yap-A song for Satawal-Return of the native. We’re dedicated to reader privacy so we never track you.

Kenneth Brower is an American environmental writer. He has written a number of books about the environment, national parks, and natural places. He authored the series The Earth's Wild Places, which was published by the Friends of the Earth in the 1970s. His most widely read book, on Yosemite, is in over 1,200 WorldCat libraries. Many of his books have been published by the National Geographic Society. Several of his books have been translated into Japanese, German, Spanish, and Hebrew

A Song of Ice and Fire Hardback Fantasy Books in English. Unclassifiable: No Bic.

A Song of Ice and Fire Hardback Fantasy Books in English. A Song of Ice and Fire Hardback Fiction Books in English.

A Song for Satawal (1817). Kessinger Publishing. This button opens a dialog that displays additional images for this product with the option to zoom in or out. Tell us if something is incorrect. A Song for Satawal (1817).

Kenneth David Brower is the oldest son of the pioneering environmentalist David Brower. His first memories are of the Sierra Nevada and the wild country of the American West. He lives in Berkeley, California.

Satawal is cropped tee with lace pattern around the boat neck, which looks a bit like Macramé texture. You can use various weights of yarn, from fingering weight for airy and transparent texture to worsted weight yarn for mid season garment. It suits knitting with both summer and winter yarn very well. The pattern is worked seamlessly from the top down. Yarn: Various weights of yarn, fingering to worsted weight. The degree of transparency depends on the weight of the yarn.

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A SONG FOR SATAWAL is a lyrical portrait of science and sorcery in Micronesia, outrigger canoes steered by starlight, monitor lizards, tattooed grandmothers, Yapese crazies, and ghosts. The cluster of tiny islands in the vast Pacific emptiness southeast of Japan is an area at once isolated and accessible. Left virtually untouched for centuries, and then dominated successively by the Spanish, Germans, Japanese, and Americans, these islands have become vulnerable to the "progress" that can be fatal to primitive cultures. In A SONG FOR SATAWAL Kenneth Brower transports us to this enchanting and fragile world. We meet Margie Falanruw, who teaches the children of Yap about the wonders of their island; Lino Olopai, who learns how to pilot a canoe over thousands of miles of ocean by relying only on chants that encode information about currents and star courses; and Kathering Kesolei, who collects the oral folklore of Palau. Through their efforts, these three truly remarkable people are preserving a part of their islands' history and culture that are in danger of perishing.
Comments (3)

Xaluenk
Kenneth Brower is better known for his other 1983 book, "Starship and Canoe", which is also magnificent reading. This book is just as good. I purchased a well-aged copy after reading the obituary in 2010 of Mau Piailug in the Economist. Mau, from the island of Satawal in the Carolines, was the navigator on the Hokulea, the canoe that sailed without any modern navigation aids from Hawaii to Tahiti in 1976, sparking revival of the indigenous Pacific voyaging culture. This book provides, in a highly readable way, insights into the way the Pacific Islanders managed their prodigious journeys across what Captain Cook called the most far-flung nation on earth. But more than that, it is an enchanting, bittersweet window into that culture itself, from the perspectives of its own people in the late 1970's when Brower spent time on the islands of Yap, Palau and Satawal, then parts of the US-administered Trust Territories of the Pacific.

Brower manages to illuminate some essences of that culture through his easy interactions with seemingly everyday, but actually extraordinary people, who are in fact the representatives and heirs of their culture. In his always entertaining narratives of these interactions, Brower conveys almost subliminally an even greater insight: that an outsider can appreciate, but never possibly master a significant fraction of the accumulated knowledge and wisdom of the culture, which extends far beyond any one individual or clan, each one of whom weaves their own accumulated and inherited knowledge and traditions into the great cultural tapestry.

Update 1/19/11 (a sour note on a wonderful book): I was surprised to see the latest Amazon listing of this book describe it as follows: "This scarce antiquarian book is a selection from Kessinger Publishings Legacy Reprint Series..."
A little sleuthing turned up this comment on the blog Munsey's Technosnarl: "...seems there's a title, A Song for Satawal, by Kenneth Brower, that's available to any and all from Google Book Search, `cuz of an 1817 copyright date. Unfortunately, 1817 marks the start of Harper and Row; book itself was first published 1983, and copyrighted in all nations apart from North Korea and Bhutan. Letting the whole .pdf of this book be downloaded is, err, probably a no-no."
Cordalas
The peoples of the South Seas traveled over much greater distances than Europeans headed to the New World and this books explains how they could navigate small boats to tiny specs in a vast ocean before the Europeans took larger boats shorter distances to great land masses.
Welen
Long ago there was a world of islands in the central Pacific with many languages and some different cultures. Stone monoliths and even a stone city still remain, but Western intruders who brought diseases over the centuries changed those atolls and islands forever. First the Spaniards, then the Germans, then the Japanese, and finally the Americans controlled that huge expanse of ocean in a burst of crazy imperialism that lasted about a century. (Spain “ruled” the islands for much longer, but hardly made any impact except on one or two.) After WW II, the islands came under American rule till the 1990s when they became “independent”. Kenneth Brower lived for some time in the islands in the late 70s or early 80s when Washington still called the shots---if it could remember to do so. A journalist with a taste for interesting details, he wrote this book in three parts. The first, rather meandering section, talks about Yap, a much-depopulated island famous for its giant stone money. He focuses on a woman who tried to set up programs in natural science. She devises activities and writes pamphlets to draw attention to the environment of the island. “Smokey the Fruit Bat” gets into the picture. She seems an interesting character, but what do we learn about Yap? The author goes off to spend an hour communing with nature and tells us what he sees. Big time adventure or in-depth presentation of culture it’s not. It is pleasant. I was wondering if I should continue. But I’m glad I did. The second and longest section is the one linked to the book’s title. If you are interested in traditional craft and traditional methods of navigation, you have to read A SONG FOR SATAWAL. The second section tells about the resurrection of traditional sailing knowledge in Micronesia derived from the knowledge of men from two tiny islands. They could make totally accurate voyages of hundreds of miles using only stars and traditional songs that guided them. A Californian once went with them back in the 1970s. Brower was hoping to learn the secret songs the men of Satawal possessed. Read the book to find out if he did. It’s a fascinating story. The third section, again, is a bit “diverse”, but follows a Palauan woman who returns from the US to take up life in her native islands again. We learn something of Palau and its culture through a project of collecting biographies among older inhabitants. Such a thing would have made a great book in itself, but here it’s put in the author’s experiential framework and so watered down to a degree. I am not an expert on the literature about Micronesia, but it seems to me there could be books that would give you a better picture. This is a pleasant, journalistic read.

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