» » The Believers

epub The Believers download

by Zoe Heller

  • ISBN: 0676978061
  • Author: Zoe Heller
  • ePub ver: 1641 kb
  • Fb2 ver: 1641 kb
  • Rating: 4.5 of 5
  • Language: English
  • Pages: 352
  • Publisher: Vintage Canada (February 9, 2010)
  • Formats: lit lrf azw docx
  • Category: Fiction
epub The Believers download

At dawn, on the top floor of a creaking hous. hapter 2. Audrey was sitting in an airy, book-lined living room on.

The challenge of modernity is to live without illusions and without becoming disillusioned. At dawn, on the top floor of a creaking hous. Audrey was sitting in an airy, book-lined living room o. hapter 3. The buoys in New York Harbor were flopping and bouncing.

The Believers is a 2008 novel by Zoë Heller. It depicts the family of a controversial lawyer in New York after a stroke renders him comatose. Each member of the Litvinoff family must confront the hypocrisies underlying their patriarch's political profile, and make difficult choices about their own values and ideological commitments. The motto of the book-"The challenge of modernity is to live without illusions and without becoming disillusioned"-is a quotation from Antonio Gramsci.

Zoe Heller's best-known book, Notes on a Scandal, was an exercise in the unreliable narrator, with all the information, including .

Zoe Heller's best-known book, Notes on a Scandal, was an exercise in the unreliable narrator, with all the information, including the information that undermined it, being given from a single point of view. Her new, fitfully brilliant novel The Believers tells its story from a wider spread of viewpoints, a more conventional approach that has a few wobbles of its own. The book starts with a prologue set in the London of 1962, charting the whirlwind courtship of teenager Audrey Howard and a visiting American, Joel Litvinoff, in his thirties.

Zoe Heller keeps producing books that could have been great if she had only managed to stick to her original purpose .

Zoe Heller keeps producing books that could have been great if she had only managed to stick to her original purpose without getting distracted. I have just finished Heller's new novel and at first I really liked it. The beginning of The Believers is simply hilarious, and it's no wonder that the book made the Best Books of 2009 list by Publishers Weekly. Heller ridicules - often in a pretty vicious way - a certain type of self-righteous leftists whose holier-than-thou attitude sometimes conceals pettiness and unenviable nastiness.

Zoë Heller was born in London in 1965 and educated at Oxford University and Columbia University, New York. She now writes for the Daily Telegraph, having been awarded the title Columnist of the Year for 2002. She has also been a contributor to several magazines

is an extraordinarily entertaining writer, and this novel showcases her copious gifts, including a scathing, Waugh-like wit. -New York Times. The Believers - Zoe Heller.

is an extraordinarily entertaining writer, and this novel showcases her copious gifts, including a scathing, Waugh-like wit. Best-selling author Zoe Heller has followed up the critical and commercial success of What Was She Thinking? Notes on a Scandal with another tour-de-force on the meaning of faith, belief, and trust: The Believers. Tragic and comic, witty and intense, The Believers is the story of a dysfunctional family forced by tragedy to confront their own personal demons.

Zoe Heller’s The Believers is one such square peg, which try as I might, I can’t fit and yet it seems a perfect fit, a dichotomy if ever there was one. Recommended by a good friend Vimal and then endorsed by my own little group here, this book had all the makings of a great read, one that I couldn’t ignore or resist. Being quite the flighty reader, it honestly didn’t take much pursuing or convincing on their part to start this book. However, it did take a little bit of convincing on my part to continue it and finish it.

When a stroke fells radical New York lawyer Joel Litvinoff, a secret is revealed that forces Audrey, his wife, to reexamine everything she believed about their forty-year marriage. In the meantime Joel's children are struggling with their own dilemmas and doubts. Disillusioned revolutionary Rosa has been drawn into the world of Orthodox Judaism. Karla, a devoted-and married-social worker hoping to adopt a child, is falling in love with the owner of a newspaper stand. Lenny, the ne'er-do-well, faces yet another relapse into heroin addiction.

Personal problems and private crisis are thrown into focus as radical lawyer, and larger than life father, Joel, lies in coma. Each chapter brings a different story: Rosa’s growing interest in Orthodox Judaism, strong-minded Audrey coming to terms with an unexpected revelation; Karla’s unhappy marriage. The fascination lies in the family dynamic as each member grapples with major life decisions – and a writing style that does both funny and moving with equal skill. Find similar books Profile. Audrey sat down in an armchair. The walls of the lounge had been painted with.

Novelist Zoe Heller's new book "The Believers" explores those themes within one family. Автовоспроизведение Если функция включена, то следующий ролик начнет воспроизводиться автоматически.

The book opens with a prologue set in mid-sixties London, where Joel Litvinoff, an American civil rights lawyer, meets a young Englishwoman, Audrey. After a brief and apparently casual affair, she decides to go to the United States and marry him. The main narrative then commences in New York in 2002. Joel is 72 and approaching the end of a long and illustrious career as an activist lawyer. He and Audrey live in Greenwich Village and have three adult children: two daughters, Rosa and Karla, and an adopted son, Lenny. Audrey is now an acid-tongued, domineering woman in late middle age who fiercely defends, but never questions, the political stance that has shaped her life. Her most tender feelings appear to be directed towards Lenny, a frequent drug user who is incapable of personal responsibility. Karla, the neglected and under-appreciated oldest child, is a social worker who is married, not very happily, to Mike. They have been trying unsuccessfully to start a family. Rosa works with disadvantaged young girls. She is becoming increasingly interested in Judaism, a faith rejected along with all others by her Jewish parents. For this she is much derided by Audrey. Joel suffers a stroke while in court and is in a coma for most of the time span covered by the book. Audrey is convinced he is not getting proper care in the hospital and creates difficulties for its medical staff. During this time of stress, Karla’s unhappiness with her marriage rises to the surface. She begins an affair with Khaled, originally from Egypt, who runs a newspaper store at the hospital where they both work. Rosa immerses herself in the study of Orthodox Judaism and, though she finds many of its teachings difficult to accept, though she perseveres. A stranger, Berenice Mason, introduces herself to Audrey, claiming that her son is Joel’s illegitimate child. Though Audrey initially dismisses her with contempt, it emerges that her story is true and that Berenice has been receiving regular financial support from Joel.  Lenny is persuaded by Audrey’s friend Jean to go to her country home in Pennsylvania for a month in order to get off drugs. He makes great progress there and, when Audrey visits, he proposes settling in Pennsylvania permanently. Appalled by the prospect of losing him, Audrey does her best to discourage the idea. Rosa abandons, and then takes up again, her studies in Orthodox Judaism deciding finally that she must pursue her religious intuitions.Joel dies without regaining consciousness. At his funeral, which is attended by thousands, Audrey gives a eulogy in which she celebrates her 40-year marriage to her husband and makes a public acknowledgment of Berenice and her son. At the reception afterwards, Karla makes a last-minute, momentous decision regarding her own marriage.From the Hardcover edition.
Comments (7)

Zetadda
This book is set in a variety of scenes in and around New York: socialist rallies, hospitals for the terminally ill, adoption agencies, upper-middle class homes in Greenwich Village, Jewish Orthodox synagogues, after school programs for poor black girls, courtrooms, etc. etc.

The author probably had to do so much research that she forgot to also create a plot. Nothing much happens in the book.

While most characters are believable (with the exception of the main character, the matron of a dysfunctional family who is so mean it's unclear why anyone still satellites around her), the story is slow and tedious.

On top of everything, the characters often speak like English people! They say thing like "don't let's" and "you mustn't" which aren't used in daily talk in America.

Heller's other book "Notes on a Scandal" set in her native London offers much subtler and more effective social commentary.
Dakora
Zoe Heller keeps producing books that could have been great if she had only managed to stick to her original purpose without getting distracted. Her novel What Was She Thinking? : Notes on a Scandal: A Novel was not bad at all, and if you think otherwise, it is probably because you were put off by the pretty weak film version. I have just finished Heller's new novel and at first I really liked it. The beginning of The Believers is simply hilarious, and it's no wonder that the book made the Best Books of 2009 list by Publishers Weekly. Heller ridicules - often in a pretty vicious way - a certain type of self-righteous leftists whose holier-than-thou attitude sometimes conceals pettiness and unenviable nastiness. You can get a pretty good idea about the first part of the novel from the following quote: "Karla always spoke of Mike's job as a union organizer with the reverence of a missionary wife describing her husband's evangelical work in Borneo."

Unfortunately, somewhere after the first third of the novel, Heller decided to abandon this line of her story and turned to creating a trite, boring, and repetitive melodrama. The children of the above-mentioned self-righteous leftists are understandably disillusioned by their parents' political agenda and start looking for the meaning of life in drugs, affairs and Orthodox Judaism. Among these three solutions as they are described by Heller, the drug addiction is presented as pretty much the most innocuous one.

We see in The Believers a gifted writer who is somehow too afraid of her own gift to let it flourish. In our patriarchal society, even very talented women obviously have a very hard time believing that they can dedicate their lives to anything other than trivialities. Trivial literature, trivial lives, trivial occupations; women still often see themselves as secondary human beings, secondary writers, and secondary artists. Heller buries her considerable talent in a barrage of trivialities that overwhelm her novel.
hardy
I loved this book and everything about it. The prose glides with grace, and Zoe Heller's characters are so true to life. This is charismatic reading at its best. The strange [or not so strange] thing is that I never truly entered the Litvinoff's home, but I carefully observed every one of the main character's activities. I revisited the West Side of Manhattan and was reminded of what life may be like there.

Fortify yourselves before meeting Audrey and Joel Litvinoff. They are left-wing liberals and seem to believe in their causes. Naturally, speak to your physician first, and then take some B Complex, Vitamin C and all the immunity-fighting vitamins you are able to tolerate. Believe me, I know these people. I really do!

The `Audreys' on the West Side have the ability to skewer you. They guess your weight, measure your dress size, judge your tastes, and usually have biting wits. If one wants to be entertained, one generally will dine with these people.

When the reader becomes familiar with Audrey, Rosa. Karla, and Lenny, Joel has been felled by a series of Cardio-Vascular Accidents. We come to know Joel, for the most part, through the women in his life. There is Audrey - there is always Audrey. Then, there are the two daughters Rosa and Karla. Rosa is seeking her roots while Karla is, also, on a journey of her own. Lenny, well, Lenny appears to try to stay 'clean.'

There was an almost tender moment between Audrey and Karla that is embedded in my memory. Audrey makes one statement to Karla and with this one statement, Audrey redeems herself. I could have reached into this book and hugged her! Sometimes, Mothers do know what they are talking about. I am purposely not stating too much. Future readers should really read this with knowing as little as possible. Suffice it to state that the reader will be in the hands of a master storyteller.

I highly recommend this intelligent book. It is filled with pathos, as well as how people may become bonded to their intellectual pursuits.
Uaoteowi
The story is about family members struggling to find themselves, after the family 'glue' suffers a stroke and they're left to fend for themselves. It was interesting enough that I read the whole book, but I found that I cared for none of the characters. And now, a few weeks later, I had to read a plot summary to do this review, because it wasn't terribly memorable.
adventure time
I read this book many, many years ago from a hard bound book I still posess, now, with yellowed pages and fragile spine. I was thrilled to see it in the Kindle bookstore. Giles writes so vividly, I felt I was on the journey with Rebecca and Richard, Permilla and even Prissy! Do yourself a favor, step back in time and open the pages to a different lifewhere freewill doesn't exist. As a side note.... The buildings still stand today, near Bowling Green, South Union Shaker Village historic museum.
Jediathain
I liked these characters, they seemed like many New Yorkers that I know. I found it believable thea way each struggled with the unfolding facts of their fathers other life after his death, in their own way. The Mother had some of the best zingers I've read in awhile.

Related to The Believers: