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by Liz Jensen

  • ISBN: 1596911883
  • Author: Liz Jensen
  • ePub ver: 1540 kb
  • Fb2 ver: 1540 kb
  • Rating: 4.6 of 5
  • Language: English
  • Pages: 288
  • Publisher: Bloomsbury USA; First Editiion edition (July 11, 2006)
  • Formats: lrf lrf lit docx
  • Category: Fiction
epub My Dirty Little Book of Stolen Time: A Novel download

Start by marking My Dirty Little Book of Stolen Time as Want to Read . Charlotte Schleswig, the delightful narrator of Liz Jensen's latest novel, supports herself and the lumpen Fru Schleswig (who may or may not be her mother) as a prostitute in 1890s Copenhagen

Start by marking My Dirty Little Book of Stolen Time as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read. Charlotte Schleswig, the delightful narrator of Liz Jensen's latest novel, supports herself and the lumpen Fru Schleswig (who may or may not be her mother) as a prostitute in 1890s Copenhagen. While she is no small success at the trade, she leaps at a new job opportunity for herse A thrillingly imagined rollercoaster of a novel bursting with sex, time travel, and true love.

My Dirty Little Book of Stolen Time seemed like a fun place to start. It was, and I am very pleased that I took the time to read this gem. Liz Jensen is a savvy literary writer, but with this work she delivers a bawdy and rollicking sci-fi drama that’s often just plain funny. This book is about time travel

For Matti, Raphaël and Laura

For Matti, Raphaël and Laura. It was a Wednesday, & I had eaten little since Sunday, Fru Schleswig & I having been well-nigh broke all winter due to the sudden absence of my two most lucrative clients – Herr Fabricius, jailed for fraud (‘a temporary hitch, I assure you, skat:I will be rogering you again within the twelvemonth’), & Herr Haboe, more permanently vanished, indeed now lying one. metre below ground, cause of death one bad oyster.

With the minxy, intrepid Charlotte, Liz Jensen introduces a heroine every bit as memorable as Louis Drax. And with My Dirty Little Book of Stolen Time, she delivers yet another outlandishly entertaining novel, in which the seemingly insurmountable obstacle of spacetime proves no match for human ingenuity and earthly passion.

ed flashing lights and screaming, hissy noises, much like a fairground jamboree randomly & catastrophically melting: but then, just as I was beginning to believe that this was Hell, &

Science Fiction & Fantasy. My Dirty Little Book of Stolen Time. Charlotte Schleswig, the delightful narrator of Liz Jensen's latest novel, supports herself and the lumpen Fru Schleswig (who may or may not be her mother) as a prostitute in 1890s Copenhagen

Science Fiction & Fantasy. Back to Science Fiction & Fantasy. While she is no small success at the trade, she leaps at a new job opportunity for herself and Fru Schleswig, as cleaning ladies for the wealthy widow Krak.

Victorian prostitutes lost in cyberspace? My Dirty Little Book of Stolen Time proves to be too much for Jessica Cran. Liz Jensen's novel paints an amusing picture of this world, reeling from excess, through the eyes of Charlotte, a plucky 19th-century Copenhagen prostitute who travels through time. We first encounter Charlotte on an icy winter's day, on her way to a local bakery where she meets a widow, Fru Krak. The wily working girl convinces Krak to hire her and her cumbersome companion as domestics in her shadowy mansion.

Jensen’s novels – from her Orange longlisted debut Egg Dancing to the wonderfully Gothic The Ninth Life of Louis Drax – are nothing if not . Fru Krak’s late husband was an inventor and the cellar contains a time machine

Jensen’s novels – from her Orange longlisted debut Egg Dancing to the wonderfully Gothic The Ninth Life of Louis Drax – are nothing if not inventive, and this magic-realist romp, like a saucy cross between H. G. Wells’s The Time Machine and Angela Carter’s Nights at the Circus, is no exception. It is narrated by Charlotte, a late-Victorian Copenhagen harlot whose attempts to find employment as a char with the overbearing Fru Krak lead her into wilder territory than she could have imagined. Fru Krak’s late husband was an inventor and the cellar contains a time machine. It isn’t long before Charlotte and her foul-mouthed sidekick Fru Schleswig.

In fin-de-siècle Copenhagen, part-time prostitute Charlotte and her lumpen sidekick, Fru Schleswig, have taken on jobs as cleaning ladies of dubious talent to tide them over the harsh winter of 1897. But the home of their neurotic new employer, the widow Krak, soon reveals itself to be riddled with dark secrets – including the existence of a demonic machine rumoured to swallow people alive. Rudely catapulted into London, the hapless duo discover a whole new world of glass, labour-saving devices and hectic, impossible romanc. iction

My dirty little book of stolen time

A TV Book Club Best Read. In fin-de-siecle Copenhagen, part-time prostitute Charlotte and her lumpen sidekick, Fru Schleswig, have taken on jobs as cleaning ladies of dubious talent to tide them over the harsh winter of 1897. Rudely catapulted into London, the hapless duo discover a whole new world of glass, labour-saving devices and hectic, impossible romance.

A thrillingly imagined rollercoaster of a novel bursting with sex, time travel, and true love.

Charlotte Schleswig, the delightful narrator of Liz Jensen's latest novel, supports herself and the lumpen Fru Schleswig (who may or may not be her mother) as a prostitute in 1890s Copenhagen. While she is no small success at the trade, she leaps at a new job opportunity for herself and Fru Schleswig, as cleaning ladies for the wealthy widow Krak. But mysteries abound at Fru Krak's dark old mansion. The basement appears to be haunted, townspeople claim to have seen the dead Professor Krak walking the streets as a ghost, and there are stories of desperate souls who paid the professor a visit and never emerged. In fact, as Charlotte will discover, there is a simple explanation for all this: the basement is home to a time machine. When their cunning investigations land them in trouble, Charlotte and Fru Schleswig find themselves catapulted through time and space to modern-day London, and there their adventures truly begin.

With the minxy, intrepid Charlotte, Liz Jensen introduces a heroine every bit as memorable as Louis Drax. And with My Dirty Little Book of Stolen Time, she delivers yet another outlandishly entertaining novel, in which the seemingly insurmountable obstacle of spacetime proves no match for human ingenuity and earthly passion.

Comments (7)

Lonesome Orange Kid
After finishing Liz Jensen’s most recent book, “The Uninvited,” and giving it an enthusiastic five-star review, I was curious to read some of her other works. “My Dirty Little Book of Stolen Time” seemed like a fun place to start. It was, and I am very pleased that I took the time to read this gem.

Liz Jensen is a savvy literary writer, but with this work she delivers a bawdy and rollicking sci-fi drama that’s often just plain funny. This book is about time travel. It tells the story a prostitute from late 19th century Copenhagen who falls into an improbable situation where she is catapulted via time travel to modern day London. There she finds a small community of other Dutch time-travelers from her same time period. They assist her in adapting to the craziness of her new world…but naturally, many in the community long to go back and revisit the old time. The reasons why they wish to do this are often exceedingly witty.

The main character is one beautiful and busty Charlotte Schleswig. Naturally, she has a heart of gold, is smart as a whip, and has a five-star mouth on her for anyone who crosses her the wrong way. Any reader will fall in love with her, and despite the comedy and sci-fi oddity of it all, Charlotte will live in the readers’ mind as a fully fleshed out and three-dimensional character. Jenson is that good as a writer.

The old-fashioned bawdy 19th century voice of the main character is perhaps the best thing about this novel. Jenson does it marvelously! For some casual readers, this odd voice might get in the way of their pleasure, but for me, it was the central best thing about this book. I can believe that Jensen started this little gem as an exercise to stretch her literary skills by writing in the voice of another century…and then it just grew into the fine novel that it is. As sci-fi goes, the story is mostly ludicrous but very merry and a delightful diversion. This book is all about character and humor…and, for me, outstanding (and very funny) period dialogue.

I loved it and think it would make a good read for a long plane ride or a few days lounging around the pool on vacation.
energy breath
If you are a Liz Jensen fan, make sure to read this. If you are not, then you don't know what you are missing.
Mora
Fairly good story - light time travel - an easy read. I bought it because I read her Ninth Life of Louis Drax - also unusual.
Mr_Mole
Usually love Liz Jensen's writing, but didn't particularly enjoy this book. I didn't like the "accent" of the main character throughout the book, and the story line waas too wandering. Sorry Liz. LOVE all your others. Cecilia
Uickabrod
Best to start by quoting a paragraph from the Paul Di Filippo review of Liz Jensen works in the July 2007 issue of "Asimov's Science Fiction" magazine:

"Jensen is not marketed as a genre author, nor reviewed in genre venues. And she doesn't exactly rate big coverage from mainstream, establishment publications, either--a result, I believe, of her slipstream nature, and her consequent falling in between two camps. And she's British, which, sadly, often militates against a wider audience in the USA. (I suspect, based on the praise-filled British blurbs for her books, that she's got a much higher profile in her native land.) These factors make it unlikely that Asimov readers will have a deep familiarity with her work. And that's a darn shame, given her superb prose, witty fantastical conceits, narrative drive, and mature sophistication."

Based on this suggestion from a knowledgeable source, I tried Dirty Little Secrets -- her latest work -- and liked it enough to hunt up copies of Egg Dancing (1995), Ark Baby (1998), The Paper Eater (2000), War Crimes for the Home (2002), and The Ninth Life of Louis Drax (2004).

Is it science fiction? fantasy? something else entirely? Your guess is as good as Filippo's; who cares -- a marzipan storyteller.
Abandoned Electrical
Best to start by quoting a paragraph from the Paul Di Filippo review of Liz Jensen works in the July 2007 issue of "Asimov's Science Fiction" magazine:

"Jensen is not marketed as a genre author, nor reviewed in genre venues. And she doesn't exactly rate big coverage from mainstream, establishment publications, either--a result, I believe, of her slipstream nature, and her consequent falling in between two camps. And she's British, which, sadly, often militates against a wider audience in the USA. (I suspect, based on the praise-filled British blurbs for her books, that she's got a much higher profile in her native land.) These factors make it unlikely that Asimov readers will have a deep familiarity with her work. And that's a darn shame, given her superb prose, witty fantastical conceits, narrative drive, and mature sophistication."

Based on this suggestion from a knowledgeable source, I tried Dirty Little Secrets -- her latest work -- and liked it enough to hunt up copies of Egg Dancing (1995), Ark Baby (1998), The Paper Eater (2000), War Crimes for the Home (2002), and The Ninth Life of Louis Drax (2004).

Is it science fiction? fantasy? something else entirely? Your guess is as good as Filippo's; who cares -- a marzipan storyteller.

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