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by William E. Koch

  • ISBN: 0700601929
  • Author: William E. Koch
  • ePub ver: 1179 kb
  • Fb2 ver: 1179 kb
  • Rating: 4.5 of 5
  • Language: English
  • Pages: 467
  • Publisher: Regents Press of Kansas; First Edition edition (1980)
  • Formats: lit rtf docx lrf
  • Category: Fiction
  • Subcategory: Mythology & Folk Tales
epub Folklore from Kansas: Customs, beliefs, and superstitions download

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Tell us if something is incorrect. Folklore from Kansas: Customs, Beliefs, and Superstitions. University Press of Kansas.

It is a solid collection of state folk beliefs and superstitions that adds greatly to our national store of such homespun wisdom and belief

A major contribution to the heritage of the Great Plains region, this volume is a compilation of over 7,000 separate items, relating to the folk customs, beliefs, and superstitions of Kansas. Every serious student of Plains culture and folklore should own this work. It is a solid collection of state folk beliefs and superstitions that adds greatly to our national store of such homespun wisdom and belief. Wayland D. Hand, Center for the Study of Comparative Folklore and Mythology, UCLA.

Personal Name: Koch, William . Folklore Kansas Superstition.

Personal Name: Koch, William E. Rubrics: Folklore Kansas Superstition. Download now Folklore from Kansas ; customs, beliefs, and superstititions William E. Koch: Download PDF book format. Download DOC book format.

Folklore from Kansas. Customs, beliefs, and superstitions. Published 1980 by Regents Press of Kansas. There's no description for this book yet.

superstition, an irrational belief or practice resulting from ignorance or fear of the unknown. The validity of superstitions is based on belief in the power of magic and witchcraft and in such invisible forces as spirits and demons. A common superstition in the Middle Ages was that the devil could enter a person during that unguarded moment when that person was sneezing; this could be avoided if anyone present immediately appealed to the name of God.

A major contribution to the heritage of the Great Plains region, this volume is a compilation of over 7,000 separate items, relating to the folk customs, beliefs, and superstitions of Kansas. More than 2,000 people, representing every county in the state, were interviewed during a fifteen-year survey conducted by Koch and his assistants.

Sailors' superstitions have been superstitions particular to sailors or mariners, and which traditionally have been common around the world. Some of these beliefs are popular superstitions, while others are actually better described as traditions, stories, folklore, tropes, myths, or legend

The metadata below describe the original scanning.

The metadata below describe the original scanning. Brand's popular antiquities of Great Britain. Faiths and folklore; a dictionary of national beliefs, superstitions and popular customs, past and current, with their classical and foreign analogues, described and illustrated. by. Brand, John, 1744-1806; Ellis, Henry, Sir, 1777-1869, ed; Hazlitt, William Carew, 1834-1913, ed. Publication date.

A comparative study of Jersey folklore (superstitions) with those of Guernsey, Normandy and Brittany, in tw. .The origin is probably the same as the Halloween pumpkins custom imported into America from Ireland and Scotland

A comparative study of Jersey folklore (superstitions) with those of Guernsey, Normandy and Brittany, in tw.The origin is probably the same as the Halloween pumpkins custom imported into America from Ireland and Scotland. The Jersey custom pre-dates the adoption of Halloween here, from America. LONG LIVE THE TURNIP ! (or so says 'Baldrick'). The example here is a pumpkin carved in a different style to the earliest 'balle-a-leunettes', but it would qualify as such and by the time of my childhood (1950s/60s) they could be carved with slanting eyes.

Book by Koch, William E.

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