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by Alfred Hayes

  • ISBN: 1933372249
  • Author: Alfred Hayes
  • ePub ver: 1210 kb
  • Fb2 ver: 1210 kb
  • Rating: 4.7 of 5
  • Language: English
  • Pages: 147
  • Publisher: Europa Editions; Reissue edition (January 1, 2007)
  • Formats: rtf lrf txt lit
  • Category: Fiction
  • Subcategory: Literary
epub The Girl on the Via Flaminia download

Alfred Hayes had fallen out of fashion long before he died in 1985 at seventyfour. Alfred Hayes’s third novel, and the first of the quartet that should be retrieved from obscurity, is The Girl on the Via Flaminia (1949)

Alfred Hayes had fallen out of fashion long before he died in 1985 at seventyfour. Yet in the ies he was regarded as one of the most interesting and original American novelists. Alfred Hayes’s third novel, and the first of the quartet that should be retrieved from obscurity, is The Girl on the Via Flaminia (1949). The room is in an apartment on Via Flaminia owned by the Pulcini family.

Now in the late afternoon, Robert waited again in the dining room, feeling the grayness of the day. He was irritable and restless. The old man glanced up at the soldier. The house was quiet and clean. Outside, the late light faded slowly. This Papalino, Ugo said, was extraordinary. and in those days there were always tourists in the city. It was before the war. He peeled the apple and talked

Lisa is a young woman obliged to work in Mamma Adele’s on the Via Flaminia. Alfred Hayes’s screenplay for Paisan, directed by Roberto Rossellini, was nominated for an Academy Award.

Lisa is a young woman obliged to work in Mamma Adele’s on the Via Flaminia. The passion they feel for one another is fueled by their separate, and equally desperate, needs. But can love between victor and vanquished ever blossom? This classic story of a poignant love affair, informed by the aftermath of war, is as relevant and moving today as when it was first published. To read this book, upload an EPUB or FB2 file to Bookmate.

This talent for scriptwriting shows in Hayes’ 1949 novel, The Girl on the Via Flaminia, a slim work . Like the Italian Neo-Realist filmmakers he worked with in Italy, Alfred Hayes focusses his social drama against the larger backdrop of a world at war.

This talent for scriptwriting shows in Hayes’ 1949 novel, The Girl on the Via Flaminia, a slim work which zooms in on a microcosm of a society irreparably damaged by the ravages of war. It’s a brilliant, bleak yet beautifully written After serving in the US army in the Second World War, the British-born writer Alfred Hayes stayed on in Rome at the end of the conflict where he worked with some of the leading lights in the Italian neo-realist film movement, Vittorio De Sica and Roberto Rossellini.

Based on Alfred Hayes'own experiences of wartime Italy, this spare . Robert is a lonely American soldier looking for a girl. Lisa is cold and hungry, obliged to seek work at Mamma Pulcini's house on the Via Flaminia.

Based on Alfred Hayes'own experiences of wartime Italy, this spare, searing novel exposes the dark complexities of the relationship between men and women, victor and vanquished. Hayes has done for bruised men what Jean Rhys does for bruised women, and they both write heartbreakingly beautiful sentences' Paul Bailey, Guardian'Rings true as gold. every single character in the book is sharp with the infallible stroke of art' Daily Mail.

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Hayes, Alfred, 1911-1985. Crime & mystery, Fiction, Fiction - General, General, Fiction, General, World War (1939-1945), Soldiers, Americans, Women, World War, 1939-1945. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books. Uploaded by Lotu Tii on May 10, 2012. SIMILAR ITEMS (based on metadata). The free online library containing 450000+ books.

Based on Alfred Hayes'own experiences of wartime Italy, this spare, searing novel exposes the dark complexities of the relationship between men and women, victor and . Books related to The Girl on the Via Flaminia. Hayes has done for bruised men what Jean Rhys does for bruised women, and they both write heartbreakingly beautiful sentences' Paul Bailey, Guardian.

"An author of authentic distinction."-The New York Times

Robert is an American soldier in occupied Rome during the final months of World War II. Lisa is a young woman obliged to work in Mamma Adele's on the Via Flaminia.

The passion they feel for one another is fueled by their separate and equally desperate needs. But can love between victor and vanquished ever blossom? This classic story of a poignant love affair informed by the aftermath of war is as relevant and moving today as when it was first published.

Alfred Hayes' screenplay for Paisan, directed by Roberto Rossellini, was nominated for an Academy Award.

Comments (2)

Olwado
The book really puts you in Rome during the Allied occupation at the end of the second world war. The experience of civilians in war, particularly women becomes very real. But honestly the book ended 5 pages --or even 2 sentences too soon. What the heck happened? Left me uneasy for days.
Nirn
The liberation of Rome during World War II was not a "liberation" to many of its inhabitants, once the occupying American and British armies took up residence. Many Italians resented what they regarded as the occupiers' sense of entitlement and superiority. Perfectly capturing the atmosphere and mood of this unique point at the end of World War II, author Alfred Hayes creates a microcosm of Roman life through the Pulcini family on the Via Flaminia. Adele, the mother, needing funds and food, turns her dining room into a small café for a handful of American and British soldiers in the evening, and, if they need "company," she arranges for them to meet Italian women.

When one resident leaves, the Pulcinis' maid arranges for her friend Lisa, desperate for food and shelter, to move into the empty room and to pose as the wife of an American soldier. Robert, the "husband," is a lonely young American who wants company--not a prostitute--someone to talk to, and even, perhaps, to take to bed--but he especially wants a sense of "home," which he hopes Lisa will provide. Their awkward relationship is sensitively rendered. Lisa regards Robert as a "barbarian conqueror" and has no desire to know him better. Robert tries clumsily to establish some sort of communication, but he fails to understand that Lisa has her own needs which go beyond food and shelter. Against this backdrop of failed connections and conflict looms Antonio, the Pulcinis' son. A soldier wounded during the retreat from southern Italy, the proud Antonio sees himself as the defender of Italian values and culture. He believes Lisa is an honest married woman, a noble example of Italian womanhood, but he soon adds to the conflicts.

As much a drama as it is a novel, this book perfectly captures each person's misguided attempt to carve out a "home" during the Occupation. The themes of occupier vs. occupied, military "conquerors" vs. prideful populations who do not regard themselves as "conquered," and individuals caught up in personal crises within a governing structure over which they have no control are as universal and a propos today as they were almost sixty years ago when this book was originally written. Author Albert Hayes gives each of the main characters his/her own point of view, enhancing the reader's understanding of the conflicts which brew beneath the surface.

When the Italian police arrive and the turning point occurs, the characters have been so carefully drawn and the symbolism (a snake in the water, a crippled owl, Antonio himself) has been presented so clearly that no careful reader will be surprised by the outcome. Written in 1949, this novel (newly reprinted by Europa Editions), is filled with vibrant dialogue which reveals character and reflects Hayes's experience as a much-honored screenwriter. His characters and their troubles resonate long after the book is finished. n Mary Whipple

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