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epub The Promise of the Foreign: Nationalism and the Technics of Translation in the Spanish Philippines download

by Vicente L. Rafael

  • ISBN: 0822336510
  • Author: Vicente L. Rafael
  • ePub ver: 1766 kb
  • Fb2 ver: 1766 kb
  • Rating: 4.2 of 5
  • Language: English
  • Pages: 256
  • Publisher: Duke University Press Books (December 5, 2005)
  • Formats: azw rtf mobi lrf
  • Category: Fiction
  • Subcategory: History & Criticism
epub The Promise of the Foreign: Nationalism and the Technics of Translation in the Spanish Philippines download

of Vicente L. Rafael’s The Promise of the Foreign. Education in Cambodia is a handy book written.

of Vicente L. Rafael looks at the vernacular drama, in particu-. lar the comedia,with its declamations in a mix-. by Mark Bray, Professor of Comparative Educa

PDF Rafael's book "examines the beginnings of Filipino nationalism in the later nineteenth century until the events of the revolution of 1896.

PDF Rafael's book "examines the beginnings of Filipino nationalism in the later nineteenth century until the events of the revolution of 1896  .

Following up on Contracting Colonialism, Vicente L. Rafael studies the Philippine nationalists’ failed attempts to lay claim to Spanish, and the emergence of a hungry Tagalog meaning-machine eager to ‘host the foreign in the familiar.

The Promise of the Foreign: Nationalism and the Technics of Translation in the Spanish Philippines - Е-книга напишана од Vicente L. Rafael. Прочитајте за книгава со апликацијата Google Play Books на вашиот компјутер или уред со Android или iOS. Преземете ја The Promise of the Foreign: Nationalism and the Technics of Translation in the Spanish Philippines за офлајн читање, означете ја, обележете ја или запишувајте белешки додека ја читате.

Acts of translation entailed technics from which issued the promise of nationhood. Such a promise consisted of revising the heterogeneous and violent origins of the nation by mediating one’s encounter with things foreign while preserving their strangeness.

By VICENTE L. Durham: Duke University Press, 2005. Pp. 256. Photographs, Bibliography, Notes, Index

By VICENTE L. Photographs, Bibliography, Notes, Index. JULIUS J. BAUTISTA (a1). National University of Singapore. Published online by Cambridge University Press: 05 January 2007.

In The Promise of the Foreign, Vicente L. Rafael argues that translation was key to the emergence of Filipino nationalism in the nineteenth century. Acts of translation entailed technics from which issued the promise of nationhood

In The Promise of the Foreign, Vicente L. Acts of translation entailed technics from which issued the promise of nationhood. Such a promise consisted of revising the heterogeneous and violent origins of the nation by mediating one's encounter with things foreign while preserving their strangeness.

The promise of the foreign: nationalism and the technics of translation in the Spanish Philippines – By Vincente L. oceedings{Cannell2007ThePO, title {The promise of the foreign: nationalism and the technics of translation in the Spanish Philippines – By Vincente L. Rafael}, author {Fenella Cannell}, year {2007} }. Fenella Cannell.

colonial state formation

Vicente L. Rafael is a professor of Southeast Asian history at the University of Washington, Seattle. colonial state formation. In 2000, Duke University Press published his White Love and Other Events in Filipino History, a challenging of traditional, epic narratives of Filipino history and especially the emergence of revolutionary nationalism. His most recent work is The Promise of the Foreign: Nationalism and the Technics of Translation in the Spanish Philippines, also published by Duke University Press, in. 2005. Durham and London: Duke University Press, 2005. 231 pp. ISBN 0-8223-3664-2. Building on his previous work, Vicente Rafael examines the origins of Filipino nationalism in the nineteenth-century as a product of linguistic and cultural translation. As an invention of imperialism, the Filipino nation often struggles in its meta-narrative to justify its existence as a product of that which it once despised and still must necessarily despise.

In The Promise of the Foreign, Vicente L. Rafael argues that translation was key to the emergence of Filipino nationalism in the nineteenth century. Acts of translation entailed technics from which issued the promise of nationhood. Such a promise consisted of revising the heterogeneous and violent origins of the nation by mediating one’s encounter with things foreign while preserving their strangeness. Rafael examines the workings of the foreign in the Filipinos’ fascination with Castilian, the language of the Spanish colonizers. In Castilian, Filipino nationalists saw the possibility of arriving at a lingua franca with which to overcome linguistic, regional, and class differences. Yet they were also keenly aware of the social limits and political hazards of this linguistic fantasy.

Through close readings of nationalist newspapers and novels, the vernacular theater, and accounts of the 1896 anticolonial revolution, Rafael traces the deep ambivalence with which elite nationalists and lower-class Filipinos alike regarded Castilian. The widespread belief in the potency of Castilian meant that colonial subjects came in contact with a recurring foreignness within their own language and society. Rafael shows how they sought to tap into this uncanny power, seeing in it both the promise of nationhood and a menace to its realization. Tracing the genesis of this promise and the ramifications of its betrayal, Rafael sheds light on the paradox of nationhood arising from the possibilities and risks of translation. By repeatedly opening borders to the arrival of something other and new, translation compels the nation to host foreign presences to which it invariably finds itself held hostage. While this condition is perhaps common to other nations, Rafael shows how its unfolding in the Philippine colony would come to be claimed by Filipinos, as would the names of the dead and their ghostly emanations.


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