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by Benjamin Harshav

  • ISBN: 0804735409
  • Author: Benjamin Harshav
  • ePub ver: 1589 kb
  • Fb2 ver: 1589 kb
  • Rating: 4.4 of 5
  • Language: English
  • Pages: 249
  • Publisher: Stanford University Press; 1 edition (August 1, 1999)
  • Formats: mobi mbr lit txt
  • Category: Fiction
  • Subcategory: History & Criticism
epub Language in Time of Revolution (Contraversions: Jews and Other Differences) download

The Meaning of Yiddish (Contraversions: Jews and Other Differences).

The Meaning of Yiddish (Contraversions: Jews and Other Differences). The modern Jewish revolution has been multi-faceted and profound.

This book presents a new and comprehensive biography of one of the most .

This book presents a new and comprehensive biography of one of the most prominent artists of the twentieth century in dialogue with the events and ideologies of his time. It encompasses the 98 years of Chagall’s life (1887-1985) in Russia. Yale University's Professor Benjamin Harshav is the preeminent Jewish culture critic today. Indeed, it is a biography of the turbulent times of the twentieth century and the transformations of a Jew in it, his meteoric rise from the ghetto of the Russian Pale of Settlement to the centers of modern culture.

Find many great new & used options and get the best deals for Contraversions Jews and Other . - - Times Literary Supplement.

- - Times Literary Supplement.

a host of new and provocative insights into modern Jewish history.

Marc Chagall and His Times: A Documentary Narrative (Contraversions: Jews and Other Differen). Benjamin Harshav, Бенджамин Харшав. The Moscow Yiddish Theater: Art on Stage in the Time of Revolution.

Contraversions : Jews and other differences Contraversions Series.

Yosef Hayim Yerushalmi, Columbia University. Contraversions : Jews and other differences Contraversions Series.

Benjamin Harshav is Jacob and Hilda Blaustein Professor of Hebrew and Comparative Literature at Yale University. Among his many books is The Meaning of Yiddish (Stanford paperback, 1999).

Contraversions: Jews & Other Differences.

Marc Chagall and His Times: A Documentary Narrative (Contraversions: Jews and Other Differenc). Quantity in stock: 2. € 1. 1. FREE delivery worldwide! Description for Marc Chagall and His Times: A Documentary Narrative (Contraversions: Jews and Other Differenc) Hardcover. Contraversions: Jews & Other Differences.

This book deals with two remarkable events-the worldwide transformations of the Jews in the modern age and the revival of the ancient Hebrew . Benjamin Harshav, was a translator, poet, and scholar of Hebrew and Yiddish literature

It is a book about social and cultural history addressed not only to the professional historian, and a book about Jews addressed not only to Jewish readers. Benjamin Harshav, was a translator, poet, and scholar of Hebrew and Yiddish literature. Библиографические данные.

The first part of this book is an essay about Jews and modernism, which has nothing that Slezkine's later book does not also have.

Lists with This Book. This book is not yet featured on Listopia. The first part of this book is an essay about Jews and modernism, which has nothing that Slezkine's later book does not also have. The second part is an essay about the origin of spoken Israeli Hebrew. Hebrew began to be spoken in Ottoman Palestine by members of the Second Aliyah, revolutionaries who wanted to reject their Diaspora Jewish heritage and make themselves into New Hebrews, in the late 1900s through the 1910s.

This book on culture and consciousness in history concerns the worldwide transformations of Jewish culture and society and the revival of the ancient Hebrew language following the waves of pogroms in Russia in 1881, when large numbers of Jews in Eastern and Central Europe redefined their identity as Jews in a new and baffling world. Reviews "With his customary versatility and lucidity Harshav has given us . . . a host of new and provocative insights into modern Jewish history. . . . This book is an outstanding attempt to juxtapose the revolution in Jewish life with that of the Hebrew language in such a way that each informs our understanding of the other." ―Yosef Hayim Yerushalmi, Columbia University "It is no small component of Harshav's success in this altogether fascinating book to have made clear the family resemblance between what is still regularly called 'the almost miraculous revival of the Hebrew language' and the coterie movements of European high modernism in both politics and the arts." ―Modernism/Modernity "A wise, original, and stimulating book on the shaping of modern Jewish culture. . . . Humane, deeply erudite, and very satisfying." ―Steven Zipperstein, Stanford University "Israeli Hebrew, Angel Sáenz-Badillos has written, 'is not the result of natural evolution but of a process without parallel in the development of any other language.' The precise nature of the process is studied in illuminating detail in Language in Time of Revolution." ―London Review of Books "The crisscrossing among the discourses of literature, ideology, history, and linguistics makes for a heady intellectual experience. . . . Harshav writes with great authority and verve. . . . His discussions are a model of clarity." ―Alan Mintz, Brandeis University
Comments (3)

Eyalanev
Our generation has witnessed the miracle of Israel--the return of the people to the Land, raising the flag of their own sovereign state, and speaking the revived national language of Hebrew. In this 220-page book, the brilliant scholar Benjamin Harshav provides human dimension to this great miracle as it played out in the lives of the New Yishuv. It is the story of how a common Hebrew language emerged in the children that grew up in the Hebrew schools, and the contending social and linguistic traditions that were part of the transformation. Harshav makes a great contribution through his account and analysis of this period. I strongly recommend his book for anyone interested in the history of modern Israel and the emergence of modern Hebrew.
Ttyr
The first part of this book is an essay about Jews and modernism, which has nothing that Slezkine's later book does not also have. The second part is an essay about the origin of spoken Israeli Hebrew. Hebrew began to be spoken in Ottoman Palestine by members of the Second Aliyah, revolutionaries who wanted to reject their Diaspora Jewish heritage and make themselves into New Hebrews, in the late 1900s through the 1910s. Their children picked it up and made it into their native language, like the children of Caribbean slaves who picked up the broken language their parents spoke with the overseers and made it into creoles. Prior to that and concurrently with it, Eliezer Ben-Yehuda coined many neologisms and started writing a dictionary, several novelists such as Mendele the Book Peddler (who was also the grandfather of Yiddish literature) started writing novels in it, also adapting the language for the purpose, and Hebrew schools were established in Palestine. The language slowly made it into the public sphere in Tel Aviv, and was recognized by the British Mandate authorities as one of the official languages of Palestine. The end result was a language with mostly Semitic vocabulary and morphology, its phonology the lowest common denominator between Ashkenazi and Sephardi Hebrew, Semitic "micro-syntax" but European "macro-syntax"; this is similar to what other languages have gone through in the process of modernization.
Fenrikasa
Benjamin Harshav's `Language in Time of Revolution' plots the trajectory of the rise of Hebrew as a vernacular in Palestine and later Israel; Harshav attempts to show, quite rightly, that the support of Hebrew as the language of the Jewish state was integral to the development of new Jewish society and culture in the Holy Land. Unlike other works on the topic, Harshav is actually interested in exploring the blood and bones of the actual use of the language in the early days of its inception, showing how grass roots the effort to revive Hebrew was; he examines the literary revival of the language, which predated its use as a vernacular, since this is an important component of its history, but this is not overshadowed by the practical and detailed historical dimension of the people who decided to use Hebrew instead of another language in their daily lives. Perhaps the most insightful conclusion Harshav reaches shows how instrumental the rise of Yiddish as a 'world' language was to the formation and rise of Hebrew. The entry of Yiddish onto the stage of Jewish history as a language for politics and revolution slightly pre-dated Hebrew, and gave Hebrew and its proponents a powerful model. For anyone interested in the history of Israeli Hebrew, this book is essential.

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