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by Michael A. Rinella

  • ISBN: 0739146874
  • Author: Michael A. Rinella
  • ePub ver: 1351 kb
  • Fb2 ver: 1351 kb
  • Rating: 4.7 of 5
  • Language: English
  • Pages: 358
  • Publisher: Lexington Books; Reprint edition (November 23, 2011)
  • Formats: docx txt doc lrf
  • Category: Fiction
  • Subcategory: History & Criticism
epub Pharmakon: Plato, Drug Culture, and Identity in Ancient Athens download

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Pharmakon: Plato, Drug C. Rinella's discussion of the nature and prevalence of drugs in the Classical Age of Athens is an essential context for a major theme in the Platonic dialogues and provides a valuable background for any student of the great philosopher's works

Pharmakon: Plato, drug culture, and identity in ancient Athens. Stiegler, Bernard (2011)

1 Connections to other philosophical terms. Pharmakon: Plato, drug culture, and identity in ancient Athens. Stiegler, Bernard (2011). Distrust and the Pharmacology of Transformational Technologies".

Rinella, Michael . Lanham, MD: Lexington Books, 2010, 73-74. Whibley, Leonard, MA, A Companion to Greek Studies. Cambridge University Press. Wiechers, A. Aesop in Delphi. Meisenheim am Glan 1961. php?title Pharmakos&oldid 889551958".

Michael A. Rinella demonstrates how the power and truth claims of philosophy, repeatedly likened to a pharmakon, opposes itself to the cultural authority of a host of other occupations in ancient Greek society who derived their powers from, or likened their authority to, some. Rinella demonstrates how the power and truth claims of philosophy, repeatedly likened to a pharmakon, opposes itself to the cultural authority of a host of other occupations in ancient Greek society who derived their powers from, or likened their authority to, some pharmakon. These included Dionysian and Eleusinian religion, physicians and other healers, magicians and other magic workers, poets, sophists, rhetoricians, as well as others.

Pharmakon traces the emergence of an ethical discourse in ancient Greece, one centered on states of psychological ecstasy. In the dialogues of Plato, philosophy is itself characterized as a pharmakon, one superior to a large number of rival occupations, each of which laid claim to their powers being derived from, connected with, or likened to, a pharmakon.

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Pharmakon: Plato, Drug Culture, and Identity in Ancient Athens. oceedings{PD, title {Pharmakon: Plato, Drug Culture, and Identity in Ancient Athens}, author {Michael A. Rinella}, year {2010} }. Michael A. Rinella. View PDF.

Author: Michael A. Rinella Culture, Curriculum, and Identity in Education This page intentionally left blank Culture, Curriculum, and Identity. Plato and Protagoras: Truth and Relativism in Ancient Greek Philosophy

Pharmakon: Plato, Drug Culture, and Identity in Ancient Athens examines the emerging concern for controlling states of psychological ecstasy in the history of western thought, focusing on ancient Greece (c. 750-146 BCE), particularly the Classical Period (c. 500-336 BCE) an.

Pharmakon: Plato, Drug Culture, and Identity in Ancient Athens examines the emerging concern for controlling states of psychological ecstasy in the history of western thought, focusing on ancient Greece (c. 500-336 BCE) and especially the dialogues of the Athenian philosopher Plato (427-347 BCE).

Pharmakon traces the emergence of an ethical discourse in ancient Greece, one centered on states of psychological ecstasy. In the dialogues of Plato, philosophy is itself characterized as a pharmakon, one superior to a large number of rival occupations, each of which laid claim to their powers being derived from, connected with, or likened to, a pharmakon. Accessible yet erudite, Pharmakon is one of the most comprehensive examinations of the place of intoxicants in ancient thought yet written.
Comments (2)

asAS
This is a long, densely informative book, with thoroughly documented scholarly references, and it ventures into an area that has been little explored but badly needs more coverage.

The book is too substantial; it's daunting to review, but reviews are needed, such as describing what each chapter covers and what is significant and surprising that Rinella brings to light in each chapter. Certainly, this book more than earns its place within any entheogen history collection. It will be much-cited by other books in this area.

Entheogen scholars are discovering that visionary plants are the origin of religion. There has been a cover-up, censorship, and misrepresentation of drugs, and of the nature and origin of religion -- suppressing the drug-origin of religion, and the place of visionary drug-plants in Western antiquity. This book reveals aspects of how different the truth is from the current official story of where religion has come from. Rinella reveals how various positions and conflicts between drugs and politics played out in antiquity.

The official story is crumbling and the truth of the matter is being revealed, helped greatly by this book, which had to fight its way through the publication process and which provides one model of how to meet the unreasonably high bar for quality of scholarship, to make it past the forces of censorship that maintain the current total bias and misrepresentation of the nature of religion and the central place of drug-plants in Western cultural history.

One must wonder how many other good manuscripts have been suppressed, and how much other solid scholarship has been blocked and thwarted by the official culture and its systems of approving knowledge. Multiple grad students have told me of their plight: they know there is a gold mine of paradigm-changing evidence that is well past-due to be explored formally and published, and research in entheogen history would benefit tremendously from being supported within the academic system, but for reasons of cultural politics, is not supported, but is vehemently suppressed. "I want to study this area in grad school. But there's an extreme bias against even mentioning these ideas, against even turning our attention in this direction, of even proposing to look and see what evidence exists."

It is as if the official culture realizes that if we permit our attention to be turned in this impermissible direction, the current conception of both religion and drugs (and Philosophy, and culture...) is certainly doomed to be straightaway revealed as resting on an entirely false "mythology of origin". It's as if the grad students propose to their committees that we put aside the adherence to the reigning pretence, stop burying our heads in the sand, stop denying the existence of this subject, and actually investigate and put forth this suppressed and forbidden matter into public view.

This situation is somewhat similar to sex research in the early 20th Century, and is actually quite closely related to the recent situation with the subject of Western Esotericism, which was taboo and was instantly dismissed out-of-hand, as being inherently unacceptable as a topic of academic historical research, until recently. The entire idea of "the role of drugs in our religious history" is altogether culturally taboo; the very idea is not permissible to think, mention, or countenance, according to official culture. So Rinella's book is a major drug-politics victory, that has helped to clear the way to start to make it permissible to ask the question, for the first time, "To what extent were drugs used in our religious and cultural origins?"
Flas
pleased and satisfied with the book. packaging and shipment time were great. i'd like to keep this short, too busy for silly
games.

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