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by Kate Ross

  • ISBN: 0140234535
  • Author: Kate Ross
  • ePub ver: 1169 kb
  • Fb2 ver: 1169 kb
  • Rating: 4.9 of 5
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Penguin; Reprint edition (June 1, 1995)
  • Formats: lrf lit rtf mbr
  • Category: Fiction
  • Subcategory: Genre Fiction
epub A Broken Vessel download

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FREE shipping on qualifying offers. In 1820's London, Julian Kestrel and an unlikely partner-bold and bewitching prostitute Sally Stokes-stalk a murderer through the high places and low life in Regency London.

Kate Ross (1956-1998), was an attorney in Massachusetts, as well as the author of four books in the Julian Kestrel series set in Regency-era England.

Annie hurried over with a candle and opened the window. He slipped through in the wink of an eye, having been trained from childhood to get inside houses by every means but the door. He slipped through in the wink of an eye, having been trained from childhood to get inside houses by every means but the door from the back room to the front. A quick glance told him why: the back room was her bedchamber. The front room was the kitchen. Annie stood clasping and unclasping her fingers. Should-should I make some tea, or ought we to go-upstairs?. Biz’ness afore pleasure, he said briskly

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Also at the end she was disposed off rather conveniently a la James Bond, presumably so that Mr. Kestrel can find another love interest in forthcoming books. That said, it is rather interesting book and a good read. I will be reading other books by Ms. Ross with interest.

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Julian Kestrel, the dandy detective of Regency London, is most decidedly a man of the world and, through his valet, Dipper, reformed Cockney pickpocket, is not without ties to the underworld. One such connection is Dipper's sister Sally, a prostitute who accidentally happens across the possibility of murder while picking her clients' pockets. Since Sally is not quite in the position to go to the police with her knowledge, she and Julian must chase the clues all through London, from glittery parlors to the dank halls of a home for fallen women

In 1820's London, Julian Kestrel and an unlikely partner--bold and bewitching prostitute Sally Stokes--stalk a murderer through the high places and low life in Regency London, after Sally mistakenly steals a letter from one of her clients containing an urgent plea for help from a distraught young woman. Reading tour.
Comments (7)

Zeleence
wonderful series - so sad she dies after 4 books
Whitecaster
I love British historical fiction about the Regency period or just after. This book fits into that time frame. Julian Kestrel is a good lead hero and mystery solver, even if the mysteries are murders! Ross has a good plot with unexpected turns. Good reading.
Steelrunner
Excellent reading. Worth the suspense.
Yllk
When Dr. MacGregor, a carry-over from Julian Kestrel's first adventure, CUT TO THE QUICK, asks the young London dandy, "Look here: are you going to fret yourself into a fever about this business, burn your fingers meddling in what's not your concern, and get yourself and everybody around you into a parcel of trouble?" what could the appropriate answer be, but 'Those were more or less my plans." The dryly-spoken words make one want to laugh out loud, regardless of one's surroundings or company.
These lines are found on page 79 of A BROKEN VESSEL, by which time Julian is well and truly caught, and not just by the mystery into which he has been thrust; the Cockney 'game gal' who opened the puzzle is the sister of Julian's valet, Dipper. Even though he hasn't seen his sister Sally in over two years, the relationship picks up with no hindrance. Not so that of Sally and Kestrel. Drawn to her in spite of himself, he withdraws, not wishing to upset Dipper. As he withdraws, Sally becomes ever more determined to discover whether her "Lightning', as she calls Kestrel, has any flesh and blood beneath his elegant exterior.
Sally always indulges herself in two seemingly harmless habits with any cove who engages her; she attaches a name, and she steals some small item, while the cove is otherwise occupied. During one memorable night, she consorts with "Bristles', "Blue-Eyes' and "Blinkers"; a handkerchief is the 'prize' she draws from each of them. Only later does she discover a letter that had been wrapped in one of the cloths. The problem is, which one? It is while she is recovering from the beating administered by Blinkers that she discovers both her brother and the letter. Dipper senses a need to involve his master, because the letter was obviously written by a rather distraught lady of rank, who is being kept against her will in an unnamed place. Who and where and why engage the attentions of this unlikely trio of detectives.
In an entirely logical progression of clues and identifications, Ms. Ross spins well her web, entangling us as certainly as Kestrel is entangled by Sally. Without modern criminology techniques available, Kestrel identifies the various players, including the anonymous lady, and the involved practices of the underworld which put her in a Reclamation Home for Fallen Women.
The pathway includes trips to the stews of London as well as a short jaunt to Wiltshire to return an eleven-year-old girl to her parents. The girl under the guise of being trained as a dressmaker's assistant, has instead been allowed to go to London as a potential child prostitute. Her path crosses that of Kestrel, who utilizes her coherent story to bring down one such purveyor of these goods.
During his absence from London, Sally becomes impatient, and decides to take things into her own hands, involving all three of the men from who she stole the handkerchiefs in a purported blackmail scheme. Kestrel and Dipper return, but not in time to save the life of a woman who has been haunting one of the three men, and who turns out to be the Scottish wife of Blue-Eyes. Bristles and 'Blinkers share another secret, one which neatly ties up all the loose ends in a satisfying trial before the magistrate, Sir Richard Birnie.
As before, the sights and sounds of 1824 London are brought to vivid life by the perfect usage of the language of the time. Kestrel, MacGregor, Dipper and Sally will surely be back. The next great mystery is "When, please?"
Alianyau
I've yet to be able to get my hands on "Cut to the Quick", so I cannot compare this one to it. But I will say that I've thoroughly enjoyed this book. It's fast paced, amusing and will definately turn you in circles trying to find out "who done it". I've read "The Devil In Music" and greatly enjoyed too.

I just found out today that Ms. Ross passed in 1998 after a long fight with cancer. I can only say that I hate that her creative voice will not be heard again. I was so looking forward to reading more of her work. My sincere belated condolences to her family. -S Combs
Doomwarden
I liked the book well enough, although I do agree with those reviewers who say that the relationship between Kestrel and Sally felt contrived at best. Also at the end she was disposed off rather conveniently a la James Bond, presumably so that Mr. Kestrel can find another love interest in forthcoming books.

That said, it is rather interesting book and a good read.

I will be reading other books by Ms. Ross with interest.
Fomand
This was a very well-written, suspenseful mystery. Julian Kestrel is a dapper detective and this time he gets a lady friend. I enjoyed the story, with its social commentary, the villains and the historical detail. I also love the richness of the slang that ROss includes. I can't wait to read the other books in the series.
After reading the 2 previous reviews, I hesitated to buy this latest book by Kate Ross but, having enjoyed her other 3 so much, I did and just finished reading it. It's great! This Regency London mystery introduces Sally Stokes, an appealing "woman of the streets' with the intriguing and descriptive language of the streets. She's an inquisitive girl with a quick mind who constantly keeps Julian Kestrel, the usually unflappable and suave "gentry cove" her brother Dipper valets for, off balance. These 3 solve several intertwining mysteries satisfactorily. The ending keeps you hoping for more books from Kate Ross.

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