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by Glen Hirshberg

  • ISBN: 0786710829
  • Author: Glen Hirshberg
  • ePub ver: 1227 kb
  • Fb2 ver: 1227 kb
  • Rating: 4.8 of 5
  • Language: English
  • Pages: 352
  • Publisher: Carroll & Graf (October 21, 2002)
  • Formats: lrf mobi lit mobi
  • Category: Fiction
  • Subcategory: Genre Fiction
epub The Snowman's Children: A Novel download

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The Snowman's Children book.

The Snowman's Children is a poignant, psychologically intense first novel that tells the story of an incident from one man's childhood in the 1970s, when a serial killer called The Snowman stalked the streets of suburban Detroit.

Items related to The Snowman's Children: A Novel. Hirshberg, Glen The Snowman's Children: A Novel. ISBN 13: 9780786710829. The Snowman's Children: A Novel.

In his powerful novel, Motherless Child, Bram Stoker Award–nominee Glen Hirshberg, author of the International Horror Guild Award–winning American Morons, exposes the fallacy of the Twilight-style romantic vampire while capturing the heart of every reader. It's the thrill of a lifetime when Sophie and Natalie, single mothers living in a trailer park in North Carolina, meet their idol, the mysterious musician known only as "the Whistler. Morning finds them covered with dried blood, their clothing shredded and their memories hazy.

Other readers will always be interested in your opinion of the books you've read. Whether you've loved the book or not, if you give your honest and detailed thoughts then people will find new books that are right for them. 1. The Snowman's Children.

This is a novel set in Detroit. And only a Detroiter could have written this because you have to know the territory intimately. It's a very misunderstood city. This setting is neither bludgeoned to death with criticism nor does Hirshberg try to make you love it. It's a place where people live and try to survive in spite of the gross underbelly. Hirshberg uses the Oakland County Child Killer case as a reality underpinning his plot. The plot has nothing much to do with the case at all.

The Snowman's Children is a poignant, psychologically intense first novel that tells the story of an incident from one man's childhood in the 1970s, when a serial killer called The Snowman . More by Glen Hirshberg.

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His first novel, The Snowman’s Children, was a Literary Guild Featured Selection. Hirshberg has won the Shirley Jackson Award and been a finalist for the World Fantasy and the Bram Stoker Awards. His collection, The Two Sams, won three International Horror Guild Awards and was named a Best Book of the Year by Publishers Weekly.

The Snowman’s Children is a poignant, psychologically intense first novel that tells the story of an incident from one man’s childhood in the 1970s, when a serial killer called The Snowman stalked the streets of suburban Detroit. The incident, a result of good but woefully misguided juvenile intentions, forced his family to leave their home, and eventually forced him, at age twenty-nine, to return to his hometown in search of three old friends. Reminiscent of both To Kill a Mockingbird in its touching portrait of childhood, and the beautifully written brand of suspense that calls to mind Smilla’s Sense of Snow, The Snowman’s Children is an unusually controlled and original novel that establishes Hirshberg as an important new voice in American literature.
Comments (7)

olgasmile
Glen Hirshberg was a name unknown to me but I want to tell you this author displays a terrific gift for writing. He can put you into the setting and make you stay there, and allows the reader to flesh out that which he so lyrically describes.
This is a novel set in Detroit. And only a Detroiter could have written this because you have to know the territory intimately. It's a very misunderstood city.
This setting is neither bludgeoned to death with criticism nor does Hirshberg try to make you love it. It's a place where people live and try to survive in spite of the gross underbelly.
Hirshberg uses the Oakland County Child Killer case as a reality underpinning his plot. The plot has nothing much to do with the case at all. It revolves around the love two kids have for another who is mentally ill. As the two protagonists attempt to help her they get into a heap of trouble because they're just kids trying to do what the adults should be handling. It's a very good premise to hang a story on. The only thing lacking, in my opinion, is good solid demonstration of WHY the two protagonists love the sick person so much.
As per the OCCK the novel does not put forth a solution or even a suggestion of solution of the case. What he gives you is a great story about the fallout that affected hundreds of thousands of Detroiters.
lets go baby
What is it you're looking for in a good read? If it's a goose-bumpy tale about a serial killer which includes severed body parts, you won't find it here. However--if you're looking for a tale well told, a fully engrossing story, characters that are rich and alive and flawed and struggling and three-dimensional, buy this book. Trust me, there will be goose-bumps--but of a far more subtle nature; they're not the look-out-he's-in-the-alley kind. They're the type you get as Mattie climbs those stairs knowing Theresa is somewhere up there and he's about to discover what she has become years after the catastrophic events that led to his alienation from her.

Hirshberg is amazing in his deftness with language and characters. He executes the time sequences flawlessly, switching back and forth from Mattie's childhood tale to the drama unfolding in his adult years. As a reader, I don't appreciate a heavy hand with metaphors; Hirshberg adds in just enough to give his prose a savory flavor, not so much as to overwhelm.

In the last four sentences of the first chapter, Hirshberg tosses a tiny bit of chum into the water--and then hits the accelerator of the boat so that we follow frantically after. I began this book just after a fresh snowfall... and hardly put it down until I finished. Great read. Period.
ACOS
What makes this a scary read is the absence of the Snowman. The story is centered around him, but is not about him. The Snowman is a presence throughout the book. He is behind you, next to you, and in front of you. He is what you are looking for over your shoulder while the story of of the children and their reunion is being told. A wonderful book, with great imagery and description. There is such attention to details of the smallest things.
Dranar
Having just finished this book, I am still processing it. I will say that at times I was clutched in the throes of the mystery and at times I was wholly frustrated with the length of time it took to unravel. The climax was unsatisfying but perhaps only because I was so eager to have it figured out.

Plots were lost - that of his wife, waiting not so patiently for him to return or at least let the past stay in the past. Did she leave him forever? Not that I wished this book to be an exploration of his life, but the early build up of that subplot seemed to require a bit more effort to offer some closure by the end.

Yet, maybe that's the point. That this journey Mattie takes is a journey to tie up loose ends, to place his history into some sort of box, labelled, understood and neatly packed away. The truth of anyone's history, no matter how melodramatic or mundane, is that one's life is a mess of loose ends, nothing finishes, only propells us forward. There is no closure available to anyone that rights the wrongs of the past or promises a pleasant tomorrow. All we can do is come to peace with what was and appreciate what is instead of looking only to what will be.

The writing is sometimes lyrical and sometimes seems to try too hard. It is obviously a first novel though not one to ignore. As the moments since I put it down have passed I feel more of a kinship towards the material and perhaps that will grow.

Would I recommend it? If you purchased it for a bargain price as I did, yet. I doubt it's one I'll read again and again, but it was interesting enough the first time around.

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