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by Julian Stockwin

  • ISBN: 0340794801
  • Author: Julian Stockwin
  • ePub ver: 1498 kb
  • Fb2 ver: 1498 kb
  • Rating: 4.8 of 5
  • Language: English
  • Pages: 448
  • Publisher: Hodder & Stoughton (April 30, 2004)
  • Formats: lit docx txt doc
  • Category: Fiction
  • Subcategory: Genre Fiction
epub Mutiny download

Mutiny ( Kydd - 4 ) Julian Stockwin Julian Stockwin Mutiny CORONET BOOKS Hodder with transports and others there were now forty or more vessels breaking out into the Atlantic.

Mutiny ( Kydd - 4 ) Julian Stockwin Julian Stockwin Mutiny CORONET BOOKS Hodder with transports and others there were now forty or more vessels breaking out into the Atlantic. Kydd - 4 ). Julian Stockwin. CORONET BOOKS Hodder & Stoughton. First published in Great Britain in 2003 by Hodder and Stoughton First published in paperback in 2004 by Hoddcr & Stoughton A division of Hodder Headline.

Victory: Thomas Kydd 11. Then suddenly, Stockwin wakes up and remembers that his title has promised a sea adventure

Victory: Thomas Kydd 11. Then suddenly, Stockwin wakes up and remembers that his title has promised a sea adventure. So, he ends his book with a fleet action-a fleet action which, not surprisingly, has nothing to do with the rest of the book, not the mutiny, not the married lady, not the Adriatic incursion, and not the early sea battle. Although I must admit, it is a wonderfully written fleet action. In sum, the first 150 pages of "Mutiny" are irrelevant.

A Coronet paperback 13579 10 8642 All rights reserved.

A Coronet paperback 13579 10 8642 All rights reserved tten permission of the publisher, nor be otherwise circulated in any form of binding or cover other than that in which it is published and without a similar condition being imposed on the subsequent purchaser. All characters in this publication arc fictitious and any resemblance to real persons, living or dead, is purely coincidental.

Read unlimited books and audiobooks on the web, iPad, iPhone and Android. With all the wind-whipped passion and salty authenticity that only a veteran naval lieutenant commander could bring to the fiction table, bestselling author Julian Stockwin continues the acclaimed saga of seaman Thomas Paine Kydd as he takes on the most perilous venture of his career.

Julian Stockwin (born 1944 in Basingstoke, Hampshire, England) is an author of historical action-adventure fiction. As well as the Kydd Series he has written two standalone novels The Silk Tree and The Powder of Death

Julian Stockwin (born 1944 in Basingstoke, Hampshire, England) is an author of historical action-adventure fiction. As well as the Kydd Series he has written two standalone novels The Silk Tree and The Powder of Death. Born in 1944, Stockwin soon developed a love for the sea, having an uncle, Tom Clay, who was a seaman in square-rigged ships and had sailed around Cape Horn in the Cutty Sark.

Stockwin, Just discovered your book in the local library. I was mesmerized as Julian S. took us into the Royal Navy at the bottom of the bottom. I gave my dad a copy and Dad said he could taste the sal. ydd’s hurricane reminded him of Typhoon Cobra in 1944, only worse. The title is The Iberian Flame.

Tenacious Julian Stockwin This text was converted to HTML, from a Commercial . The Admiral's Daughter. A kydd sea adventure.

Tenacious Julian Stockwin This text was converted to HTML, from a Commercial eBook in PDF format, using ABBYY Fine Reader 10, proofed by the proofer and called (v. ). My scans, conversions. Mcbooks press, inc. ithaca, new york. First published in Great Britain in 2005 by Hodder and Stoughton A division of Hodder Headline.

Julian Stockwin was sent to sea-training school at the age of fourteen, then he joined the Royal Navy at fifteen. He transferred to the Royal Australian Navy when his family emigrated and saw service in the Far East, the Antarctic and the South Seas. In Vietnam he served on a carrier task force. Later commissioned into the Royal Naval Reserve.

Julian Stockwin But not even shipwreck, mutiny, or a confrontation with a mighty French frigate manages to thwart Artemis and her crew.

In the eighth book of this popular series, Thomas Kydd and Nicholas Renzi return to England in 1803 after tumultuous episodes on the other side of the world to find England in peril of starvation and bankruptcy. Kydd is placed back in command of his beloved vessel, Teazer, but he barely has time to prep her for the sea when he is sent on an urgent mission. A dramatic new cover look for the bestselling adventures of Kydd in the Great Age of Sail. But not even shipwreck, mutiny, or a confrontation with a mighty French frigate manages to thwart Artemis and her crew.

It is 1797 and Thomas Kydd is now master's mate on Achilles, a 64-gun ship-of-the-line, on his way back from the Caribbean. After a dangerous rescue mission to Venice Kydd sails for England, but his joy at returning home after many years' absence is soon forgotten when he finds himself at the centre of one of the most extraordinary events in English history -- the Mutiny at the Nore. Ten thousand men, one thousand guns and scores of ships hold the country to ransom: the government is near collapse; the economy on the brink of ruin. And Kydd is faced with a terrible choice. Abandon his friends and shipmates? Or join the rebellion and put his career -- and even his life -- on the line?
Comments (7)

Felolune
Another good book in this series, although I didn't feel it was quite as good as the previous three. Not as much naval action in this book and that may be the reason I didn't enjoy it as well. I would recommend reading the first three books before reading this book. It can be read as a stand-alone book, but this book doesn't do justice for how good the whole series is and you`ll enjoy it much better reading it in order.
Mejora
This novel finds Thomas Kydd serving as a master's mate on board the 64 gun ship Achilles. Initially they go to Gibraltar in early 1797, where Kydd becomes involved with a married woman. His friend, Nicholas Renzi, gets him temporary duty on a frigate bound on a special mission to the Adriatic Sea in order to pry him loose from an affair that could ruin his career (and maybe get him horsewhipped by the woman's husband). This adds a side adventure to the plot with a good description of events in Venice as Napolean closes in to occupy the city. We also learn something of Renzi's past life.

After returning to his ship in Gibraltar, the Achilles returns to England and is diverted to the Nore after learning of the mutiny at Spithead. That only delays the problem, and actually gets the ship into a bigger problem when the mutiny spreads to the Nore and the North Sea fleet. Kydd finds himself drawn into the plot and putting his life on the line as a mutineer.

The novel is one of the better descriptions of the events at the Nore and within the North Sea fleet. The author has carried out some good research, and gives a good description of the area at that time, as well as the events within the mutiny. Nicholas Renzi needs to go to great lengths to preserve Kydd's life, but makes him a turncoat to the foredeck hands. Kydd also loses Kitty, the new love in his life (sailors seem to have raging hormones that take them from woman to woman).

The novel ends with action at the Battle of Camperdown, and Kydd's step up to a temporary rank of lieutenant and a meeting with Admiral Onslow, from the same town in England, which brings him to the admiral's attention. The Admiral knows of the school run by Kydd's parents.

One reason I did not give the novel a five star rating is because of errors in the extraneous material introduced by the author, always a problem especially when an author inserts color commentary. Some literary license can be tolerated, but not errors in basic geography. In the last sentence of Chapter Two, for example, he puts Naples in the northern Adriatic (please invest in a map before you write the next novel). There is also a problem with the interlude in Gibraltar as women and children had been evacuated before the time indicated in the novel. The evacuation is covered in the biography of Peter Puget, who commanded the ships used for the evacuation.

I would note that I have the same problem with Stockwin's novels that I had with O'Brien's novels, i.e., too much action in too short a time period, with ships zipping about at high speed from one point to the next. In reality, sailing was a slow business, especially if you encountered head winds. Also, the descriptions of ship handling may leave the reader a bit glassy-eyed if one is not a deep-water sailor. It was a very technical profession which Stockwin has made very evident.

I would question the author's comments about the lack of masters mates, which some accounts from the period seem to indicate were fairly common. Perhaps this was a transition period where more emphasis was placed on midshipmen (who, essentially, were untrained apprentices and highly expendable).
Hellblade
If you enjoyed reading the fabulous Jack Aubrey series of naval adventure novels from the late Patrick O'Brian, then you will love the Kydd Series by Julian Stockwin. Nothing can replace O'Brian, of course, but these come surprisingly close in some ways. The strength of this series is the sailor's dialogue, as created by Stockwin, a former officer in Her Majesty's Navy. Picture this scene: The press gang has just busted into a busy tavern and the leader of the group has to shout to get the attention of the befuddled customers...Stockwin's dialogue can be very funny..."So, who's fer a life on the rollin' seas?" That's from memory--it had me laughing for a day or two--but you get the idea. I have read all of Forester, Kent, Cornwell, and a few of the others, and the Kydd series is right up there with the best of them. In my opinion, the dialogue is a match for O'Brian, or even superior, although, in total, O'Brian's work remains the best that has ever been published in this genre. Moreover, Stockwin's knowledge and descriptions of the technical details of running a King's ship at the end of the 18th century is absolutely on a par with O'Brian, in my opinion.
Fenrikasa
The first three Kydd adventures gave me great pleasure. This one was a disappointment.

The first 150 pages consist of three disconnected stories. In Gibraltar, Kydd becomes infatuated with a married woman. Then he's wisked away on an incursion into the Adriatic which, for awhile, holds promise of becoming an interesting tale. But eventually he sails back to Gibraltar with this adventure inconclusive and unsatisfying. Upon his return, Kydd fears a confrontation with the lady's husband. However, a fortuitous and improbable misunderstanding keeps the husband in the dark. And so, when Kydd departs for England, his romance comes to an inconclusive and unsatisfying end. Crossing the Bay of Biscay, there's a naval battle (finally). But after a great beginning, this confrontation also is inconclusive and unsatisfying. None of these three stories has anything to do with the mutiny or with each other.

But at around page 150, begins the infamous Noor mutiny, from which this book derives its name.

When a fictional character is dropped into a great historical event, the author must write two stories: the big story of the epic event, and the little story, consisting of the hero's personal tale. And, it is essential that the big story remain in the background while the smaller, personal tale is kept center stage. But here, Kydd has no personal tale. He has no goals outside of the mutiny, and even there, he is ineffective. As acknowledged on page 299: "[Kidd] had been carried along by events and was as powerless to affect them as a leaf in a fast stream." Kydd has been reduced from his normal status as action hero to a mere observer of events. More damningly, the events consist mainly of strategy meetings, negotiations, and political maneuvering. The title of this book should be "Mutiny: A Kydd Bureaucratic Adventure."

However, at the 300-page mark, Kydd's old friend Renzi swings into action. It is he who provides the "little story." Renzi must save Kydd from the certain doom towards which Kydd is being carried. Kydd has no idea how to save himself and for most of the time is even unaware of his own danger. Renzi shows insight, cleverness, daring and a dash of perfidy in his efforts to save his old friend. Although Kydd is this book's main character, Renzi proves to be the hero.

Then suddenly, Stockwin wakes up and remembers that his title has promised a sea adventure. So, he ends his book with a fleet action--a fleet action which, not surprisingly, has nothing to do with the rest of the book, not the mutiny, not the married lady, not the Adriatic incursion, and not the early sea battle. Although I must admit, it is a wonderfully written fleet action.

In sum, the first 150 pages of "Mutiny" are irrelevant. The next 150 pages are boring. The final 50 pages save the book, getting it three stars.
Agamaginn
Another good book in this series, although I didn't feel it was quite as good as the previous three. Not as much naval action in this book and that may be the reason I didn't enjoy it as well. I would recommend reading the first three books before reading this book. It can be read as a stand-alone book, but this book doesn't do justice for how good the whole series is and you`ll enjoy it much better reading it in order.
Elastic Skunk
This novel finds Thomas Kydd serving as a master's mate on board the 64 gun ship Achilles. Initially they go to Gibraltar in early 1797, where Kydd becomes involved with a married woman. His friend, Nicholas Renzi, gets him temporary duty on a frigate bound on a special mission to the Adriatic Sea in order to pry him loose from an affair that could ruin his career (and maybe get him horsewhipped by the woman's husband). This adds a side adventure to the plot with a good description of events in Venice as Napolean closes in to occupy the city. We also learn something of Renzi's past life.

After returning to his ship in Gibraltar, the Achilles returns to England and is diverted to the Nore after learning of the mutiny at Spithead. That only delays the problem, and actually gets the ship into a bigger problem when the mutiny spreads to the Nore and the North Sea fleet. Kydd finds himself drawn into the plot and putting his life on the line as a mutineer.

The novel is one of the better descriptions of the events at the Nore and within the North Sea fleet. The author has carried out some good research, and gives a good description of the area at that time, as well as the events within the mutiny. Nicholas Renzi needs to go to great lengths to preserve Kydd's life, but makes him a turncoat to the foredeck hands. Kydd also loses Kitty, the new love in his life (sailors seem to have raging hormones that take them from woman to woman).

The novel ends with action at the Battle of Camperdown, and Kydd's step up to a temporary rank of lieutenant and a meeting with Admiral Onslow, from the same town in England, which brings him to the admiral's attention. The Admiral knows of the school run by Kydd's parents.

One reason I did not give the novel a five star rating is because of errors in the extraneous material introduced by the author, always a problem especially when an author inserts color commentary. Some literary license can be tolerated, but not errors in basic geography. In the last sentence of Chapter Two, for example, he puts Naples in the northern Adriatic (please invest in a map before you write the next novel). There is also a problem with the interlude in Gibraltar as women and children had been evacuated before the time indicated in the novel. The evacuation is covered in the biography of Peter Puget, who commanded the ships used for the evacuation.

I would note that I have the same problem with Stockwin's novels that I had with O'Brien's novels, i.e., too much action in too short a time period, with ships zipping about at high speed from one point to the next. In reality, sailing was a slow business, especially if you encountered head winds. Also, the descriptions of ship handling may leave the reader a bit glassy-eyed if one is not a deep-water sailor. It was a very technical profession which Stockwin has made very evident.

I would question the author's comments about the lack of masters mates, which some accounts from the period seem to indicate were fairly common. Perhaps this was a transition period where more emphasis was placed on midshipmen (who, essentially, were untrained apprentices and highly expendable).
Molotok
If you enjoyed reading the fabulous Jack Aubrey series of naval adventure novels from the late Patrick O'Brian, then you will love the Kydd Series by Julian Stockwin. Nothing can replace O'Brian, of course, but these come surprisingly close in some ways. The strength of this series is the sailor's dialogue, as created by Stockwin, a former officer in Her Majesty's Navy. Picture this scene: The press gang has just busted into a busy tavern and the leader of the group has to shout to get the attention of the befuddled customers...Stockwin's dialogue can be very funny..."So, who's fer a life on the rollin' seas?" That's from memory--it had me laughing for a day or two--but you get the idea. I have read all of Forester, Kent, Cornwell, and a few of the others, and the Kydd series is right up there with the best of them. In my opinion, the dialogue is a match for O'Brian, or even superior, although, in total, O'Brian's work remains the best that has ever been published in this genre. Moreover, Stockwin's knowledge and descriptions of the technical details of running a King's ship at the end of the 18th century is absolutely on a par with O'Brian, in my opinion.
The first three Kydd adventures gave me great pleasure. This one was a disappointment.

The first 150 pages consist of three disconnected stories. In Gibraltar, Kydd becomes infatuated with a married woman. Then he's wisked away on an incursion into the Adriatic which, for awhile, holds promise of becoming an interesting tale. But eventually he sails back to Gibraltar with this adventure inconclusive and unsatisfying. Upon his return, Kydd fears a confrontation with the lady's husband. However, a fortuitous and improbable misunderstanding keeps the husband in the dark. And so, when Kydd departs for England, his romance comes to an inconclusive and unsatisfying end. Crossing the Bay of Biscay, there's a naval battle (finally). But after a great beginning, this confrontation also is inconclusive and unsatisfying. None of these three stories has anything to do with the mutiny or with each other.

But at around page 150, begins the infamous Noor mutiny, from which this book derives its name.

When a fictional character is dropped into a great historical event, the author must write two stories: the big story of the epic event, and the little story, consisting of the hero's personal tale. And, it is essential that the big story remain in the background while the smaller, personal tale is kept center stage. But here, Kydd has no personal tale. He has no goals outside of the mutiny, and even there, he is ineffective. As acknowledged on page 299: "[Kidd] had been carried along by events and was as powerless to affect them as a leaf in a fast stream." Kydd has been reduced from his normal status as action hero to a mere observer of events. More damningly, the events consist mainly of strategy meetings, negotiations, and political maneuvering. The title of this book should be "Mutiny: A Kydd Bureaucratic Adventure."

However, at the 300-page mark, Kydd's old friend Renzi swings into action. It is he who provides the "little story." Renzi must save Kydd from the certain doom towards which Kydd is being carried. Kydd has no idea how to save himself and for most of the time is even unaware of his own danger. Renzi shows insight, cleverness, daring and a dash of perfidy in his efforts to save his old friend. Although Kydd is this book's main character, Renzi proves to be the hero.

Then suddenly, Stockwin wakes up and remembers that his title has promised a sea adventure. So, he ends his book with a fleet action--a fleet action which, not surprisingly, has nothing to do with the rest of the book, not the mutiny, not the married lady, not the Adriatic incursion, and not the early sea battle. Although I must admit, it is a wonderfully written fleet action.

In sum, the first 150 pages of "Mutiny" are irrelevant. The next 150 pages are boring. The final 50 pages save the book, getting it three stars.

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