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by Harry Turtledove

  • ISBN: 0340921803
  • Author: Harry Turtledove
  • ePub ver: 1734 kb
  • Fb2 ver: 1734 kb
  • Rating: 4.2 of 5
  • Language: English
  • Pages: 624
  • Publisher: Hodder Paperback (2008)
  • Formats: azw rtf lrf docx
  • Category: Fiction
  • Subcategory: Genre Fiction
epub Settling Accounts download

It takes the Southern Victory Series world from 1941 to 1944.

Return Engagement (2004) ; first book in the series and eighth in the overall timeline. Drive to the East (2005) ; second book in the series and ninth in the overall timeline. The Grapple (2006) ; third book in the series and tenth in the overall timeline.

Only 12 left in stock (more on the way). Harry Turtledove is the award-winning author of the alternate-history works The Man with the Iron Heart, The Guns of the South, and How Few Remain (winner of the Sidewise Award for Best Novel); the Hot War books: Bombs Away, Fallout, and Armistice; the War That Came Early novels: Hitler’s War, West and East, The Big Switch, Coup d’Etat, Two.

Only 8 left in stock (more on the way). Harry Turtledove's remarkable alternative history novels brilliantly remind us of how fragile the thread of time can be, and offer us a world of "what i. Drawing on a magnificent cast of characters that includes soldiers, generals, lovers, spies, and demagogues, Turtledove returns to an epic tale that only he could tell-the story of a North American continent, separated into two bitterly opposed nations, that stands on the verge of exploding once again.

Year Published: 1993. Welcome to Gray City. The free online library containing 450000+ books. Read books for free from anywhere and from any device. Year Published: 2015. Year Published: 2005. Listen to books in audio format instead of reading.

4 primary works, 4 total works. Book 2. Drive to the East. Book 1. Return Engagement. From Book 1: handles his hug. ore. Harry Turtledove–the master of alternate history.

Year Published: 2015. Year Published: 1998.

Harry Turtledove's remarkable alternative history novels brilliantly remind us of how fragile the thread of time can be, and offer us a world of what if. Drawing on a magnificent cast of characters that includes soldiers, generals. Harry Turtledove's remarkable alternative history novels brilliantly remind us of how fragile the thread of time can be, and offer us a world of what if. Drawing on a magnificent cast of characters that includes soldiers, generals, lovers, spies, and demagogues, Turtledove returns to an epic tale that only he could tell–the story of a North American continent, separated into two bitterly opposed nations, that stands on the verge of exploding once again.

by. Turtledove, Harry. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books.

Comments (7)

Opithris
For the love of Pete, I hope anyone reading this has read the first 10 books (counting How Few Remain) of this series. Otherwise, spoiler alert.

Harry's mission was simple: What would North America be like if the South had won the Civil War? I think his broad strokes are far and away the best part of of his narrative. I enjoyed how he paired up the North with Germany and Austria/Hungary, even as the junior partner to Germany in WWI and even a bit in WWII. It was nice too that he kept things specifically in our hemisphere, and didn't diverge with details of the European campaigns, the snapshots he gave of the action there was quite enough. The development of the atomic bomb was really well done, though I won't spoil any of the details here.

The characters? A mixed bag. A few of them lasted through the last 10 books, including Northern military men Irving Morrell (the hero of the series, if there was one), Sam Carsten, and Jonathan Moss, and Southern soldier/demagogue/leader Jake Featherston. Also lasting the series was Cincinnatus Driver, a black Kentuckian turned Iowan, as well as Jefferson Pinkard, steel worker turned Holocaust commandant. George Enos Jr. and Clarence Potter graduated from recurring characters in the first few books, to main characters in the later ones, Potter wound up being my favorite of the characters. Flora Hamburger Blackford was one of the few women profiled, the only one to last the final 10 books, and I liked how she evolved over time.

That was a problem though, few characters evolved, even the ones who we got to know for 10 books. Particularly irksome were earlier book characters like Nellie Semphroch Jacobs, who hated men with a passion, and never allowed her inner monologue to let us forget it. The MacGregors in Manitoba were also one note, yes, they hated America, but I got tired of reading it after awhile. Sam Carsten was a good guy, but he was a bit too much 'aw shucks' at times.

Jake Featherston was one note too, but I didn't mind him so much, as he was clearly Adolph Hitler. I've read reviews on here of Southerners taking Harry to task for this, and for making the Confederates out to be Nazis, but it was all too plausible. Yes, the Civil War as it actually was had many underlying causes, but I think the apologists are reaching a bit when they complain about the treatment of it here. The death camps were done in a way that wasn't too macabre, but still showed the inhumanity of the entire thing. He even included Sonderkommandos (prisoners helping the process, hoping to postpone their own deaths), though he didn't dwell on them.

Does In at the Death suffice as a fitting conclusion? Yes, I think it does. He wraps up many of the storylines well enough, while leaving some of them open if he decides to do another series. I won't say who won, and who else died, though the earlier books did surprise me more than a few times with who they lopped off.

Was this series perfect? Of course not, and while I own well over a dozen of Harry's books, I have to wonder if his publishing pace is a bit too fast for quality sometimes. But when I buy his stuff, I'm almost guaranteed to at least like it. The overall narrative is more than enough to compensate for some rote characters, and it's an interesting way to look at history. Four stars.
Gom
"Settling Accounts: In at the Death" is the fourth novel in the "Settling Accounts...." series. It is Turtledove at his best...and worst. He can be repetitive. His descriptive passages seem flat and formulaic.
To appreciate the power of this novel, one should read the three novels preceding it. Only then, does one understand the behaviors of the characters and the accuracy and nuances of Turtledove's plot.
While this novel is entertaining as alternative history, I found its hidden value in its exploration of racism, anti-semitism, regionalism, nationalism, bias, and within group differences. Turtledove's portrayal of the long term effects of slavery on all groups is blunt and raw. He pulls no punches. While he is certainly not Hemingway, his dialogue creates a vision that makes you think, groan, and wonder.
You must have some knowledge of American history from the Civil War through the end of WWII to experience the full thematic impact of this novel. Much of Turtledove's effct occurs when he slighltly bends or warps an historically recognizable figure into a character to fit the dramatic action and theme.
Enalonasa
I remember watching a documentary on the making of "SLIDERS," and there was a scene where they were interviewing Jerry O'Connell, and he was talking about when John Rhys-Davies left the show. And what he said, I believe best sums up the entire "Settling Accounts," saga.

"I can still vividly remember during reading sessions, John, banging his fist on the table, saying, 'Damn it, this show could be so good if we only did this, this, and this.'"

The story starts off where we last were at the end of "The Grapple," with US forces poised outside Atlanta, with the possibility of Confederate dictator, Jake Featherstone, still pulling victory from defeat. But, the book, much like the war for Featherstone, starts to unravel as it draws to a close. The most annoying thing is Morrel cutting of Atlanta from the East. It worked for Sherman, because the majority of the CS population and industry was East of Atlanta. By the second world war in Settling Accounts, just about all of the Confederacy's rocket's, tanks, trucks, steel, and power, came from Alabama, Harry Turtledove has written that himself, and yet, the US army heads EAST!?! Whatever substance that Turtledove was ingesting when he came up with this idea, I want it now and I want it in large quantities. Most fans of Harry's work will recognize this as one of his most annoying traits that keeps rearing its head during his work. "If Harry encounters a problem that doesn't fit in with what HE wants, he simply ignores it."

But the story isn't all that bad. The characters fun to read, especially, Featherstone, and we finally get a conclusion to the Forrest Coup. Historical characters pop up from here to there, like Lord Halifax, Harry Truman, and a possible Dwight Eisenhower who takes Patton's surrender. Other characters, especially the blacks, I found fun to read as they found themselves cock of the walk in the CSA after the US troops had taken over.

The black holocaust its self is IMHO, is very well done. Although the invasion of Haiti which was mentioned towards the end was an annoyance. The holocaust star's to become a blight on the civilians who have to live with it, pilled on top with the fear of US reprisals, which results in the succession of Texas, a move which caught me by surprise.

The end of the story was to be a disappointment. The CSA gets annexed with the prospect of equality for all people no matter what their skin color is. It all happens so fast you can't help but wonder weather or not Turtledove just threw that in for closure, or after all the horrible nasty, cruel stuff that'd been going on, he simply wanted something good to come out of all this. Most likely, option 'A.' Fans will be disappointed that the European war is left unconcluded. The countries of Europe are left in ruins and at the negotiating table by the books end, leaving the fate of Europe up in the air. The fate of Canada and the Mormons drops off the face of the earth, and Japan get's away with murder once more, turning into an analogue of Soviet Russia.

In the end, despite all the unfinished plot lines that disappeared down a black hole, I'm glad the series is over. Although you would clamor for more, there's really nothing more to continue with this series. After all, this has always been about the USA and the CSA, and now that the CSA is dead, there's no more story.

After all is said and done, in at the Death scores a 6 out of ten. It was still a good read, and you will enjoy it yourself if you are a fan of the series.

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