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by Monica Pradhan

  • ISBN: 055338452X
  • Author: Monica Pradhan
  • ePub ver: 1704 kb
  • Fb2 ver: 1704 kb
  • Rating: 4.2 of 5
  • Language: English
  • Pages: 448
  • Publisher: Bantam (May 1, 2007)
  • Formats: txt mobi txt mobi
  • Category: Fiction
  • Subcategory: Genre Fiction
epub The Hindi-Bindi Club: A Novel download

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Only 8 left in stock (more on the way).

The Hindi-Bindi Club. Who is Monica? The Novel. They are the Hindi-Bindi Club, a nickname given by their American daughters to the mothers who left India to start life anew. Daughters, now grown, and facing struggles of their own. Kiran, Preity, and Rani are coming home for the holidays. Home to the suburbs of Washington, . and of course, to the Hindi-Bindi Club. For what holiday would be complete without their mother hens' mouthwatering food, their gossip - and their unsolicited advice? For Kiran, a successful career can't fill the void left by her estrangement from her parents.

The Hindi-Bindi Club sparkles with wit, heart, and truth. I loved the characters, and their tender connection, and how they never stop seeking ways back to each other. Monica Pradhan has written a beautiful novel about family, the strength of women, and the power of love. With a voice as fresh as a morning wind, Monica Pradhan blows away the dusty stereotypes of Indian culture. The Hindi-Bindi Club is as Indian and as mannered as a gold-threaded sari, but also as young and hip and thoroughly American as rollerblades

Monica Pradhan did a great job of explaining the subtle layers of Indian culture for me. In The Hindi-Bindi Club, three young (I'm 40; they're younger than me) Indian-American women learn through their relationships with their moms that living up to the expectations of their families can allow room for keeping their own individuality as well.

The hindi bindi club, . The Hindi-Bindi Club, . Not only is she a culinary genius but, luckily for the rest of us, she owns one of the premier catering services in the . Metro Area, possibly the eastern seaboard. She started it back in the Boston Days.

They are the Hindi-Bindi Club, a nickname given by their American daughters to the mothers who left India to start anew-daughters . Monica Pradhan's parents immigrated to the United States from Mumbai, India, in the 1960s.

They are the Hindi-Bindi Club, a nickname given by their American daughters to the mothers who left India to start anew-daughters now grown and facing struggles of their ow. or Kiran, Preity, and Rani, adulthood bears the indelible stamp of their upbringing, from the ways they tweak their mothers’ cooking to suit their Western lifestyles to the ways they reject their mothers’ most fervent beliefs. She was born in Pittsburgh, PA, and grew up outside Washington, DC. and now lives in Minnesota and Toronto with her husband. New York : Bantam Books. They are the Hindi-Bindi Club, a nickname given by their American daughters to the mothers who left India to start anew - daughters now grown and facing struggles of their own. inlibrary; printdisabled; ; ctlibrary; china; americana. For Kiran, Preity, and Rani, adulthood bears the indelible stamp of their upbringing, from the ways they tweak their mothers' cooking to suit their Western lifestyles to the ways they reject their mothers' most fervent beliefs. Authors: Monica Pradhan.

You can read book The Hindi-Bindi Club by Monica Pradhan in our library for absolutely free. The Hindi-Bindi Club.

They are the Hindi-Bindi Club, a nickname given by their American daughters to the mothers who left India to start anew-daughters now grown and facing struggles of their own. For Kiran, Preity, and Rani, adulthood bears the indelible stamp of their upbringing, from the ways they tweak their mothers’ cooking to suit their Western lifestyles to the ways they reject their mothers’ most fervent beliefs.

mentioned in the novel The Hindi Bindi Club by Monica Pradhan. Three utterly diverse Indian women, all in their thirties, from entirely unlike cultures formed an impromptu alliance upon. Monica Pradhan's biological parents immigrated to the United States from Mumbai, India, in the 1960s.

For decades they have remained close, sharing treasured recipes, honored customs, and the challenges of women shaped by ancient ways yet living modern lives. They are the Hindi-Bindi Club, a nickname given by their American daughters to the mothers who left India to start anew—daughters now grown and facing struggles of their own.For Kiran, Preity, and Rani, adulthood bears the indelible stamp of their upbringing, from the ways they tweak their mothers’ cooking to suit their Western lifestyles to the ways they reject their mothers’ most fervent beliefs. Now, bearing the disappointments and successes of their chosen paths, these daughters are drawn inexorably home.Kiran, divorced, will seek a new beginning—this time requesting the aid of an ancient tradition she once dismissed. Preity will confront an old heartbreak—and a hidden shame. And Rani will face her demons as an artist and a wife. All will question whether they have the courage of the Hindi-Bindi Club, to hold on to their dreams—or to create new ones.An elegant tapestry of East and West, peppered with food and ceremony, wisdom and sensuality, this luminous novel breathes new life into timeless themes.
Comments (7)

Jockahougu
I, too, wanted to like this book. But no, it's not very good at all. Flat and dull. Somewhere this writer did not learn basic skills of sentence structure or dialogue, but especially she never learned to allow her characters to be experienced through unfolding action. We don't want to be "told" what happens (example: Kiran finally falls in love and we never get to experience the development of the relationship through action -- it's told to us in a phone conversation to her mother). Loose ends, odd back-and-forth chronology, incongruent bits and pieces. We never learn why one character has stopped talking to another; we only read a quick email apology which references a long conversation which we do NOT get to experience. We learn of an affair, and that's it. Never mentioned again, although one other character knows this secret. One character tracks down a first love and all we get is a quick telling, but no action. That whole bit seemed contrived. One character was going to experience some rituals with her sisters to cleanse the bad feelings left from their father's death. She goes to India, but we never get the rituals. One daughter was going to have demons cast out, but that never happened either. These rituals from India were one reason I wanted to experience this book. Although some history was discussed, we never really get to see what happens with the auntie who goes to Pakistan (Lahore). Did she go? Did she find her friend? What happened?

One of the most odd things is the fake angst over the daughter marrying a non-Indian, when she's already done that with her first marriage AND the other two daughters of her mother's two best friends have successful marriages with good ol' white American males. I'm not being insensitive about the father's feelings or the traditions of India, but I just didn't get why the women friends were concerned when their daughters married outside the country/faith, too. I would have enjoyed the wedding if the events would have occurred in a better chronological fashion. First we are sitting in the room, then we are told about events leading up to that point. Then back and forth. It was hard to follow. It would have been wonderful if, when the bride finally met the groom, we would have been privy to their first face-to-face conversation in action, not just "told" about it.

As for the recipes, TERRIFIC idea and I'm so glad I have more to add to my growing cache of cooking food from India. BUT... that said.... the recipes start by being connected to what is cooked during the story, but end up not being so connected to the book. Some food mentioned in the story I would have liked to see in the recipes; some recipes had no context (but that's not a major problem).

In the end, Rani has an important moment with her mother and I would have liked their ideas about the grandmother's journals to be more fleshed out and discussed. In fact, if Rani knew the whole story of her grandmother, I would have liked to the action involved in making those connections. This could have been a much deeper book. Same with Kiran and her father. Oh, "snap!" in one paragraph it's all okay. Too bad they couldn't have had a couple pages of action. As for Preity, why was she even in the book? She's has nothing to add, and her mother's story is a deadend, too. But somebody had to bring on the samosas?

Spoiler Alert: I'm sorry but there is no way in a family this intrusively "close," a mother with only one daughter (who is a doctor) would not tell her recently-divorced daughter about the mother's diagnosis with breast cancer, treatment, and radical mastectomy. But she tells her married son. No way. And then two pages later, after she tells her daughter, everything's fine and the daughter has read the mother's whole medical file and called all the doctors for consultations. That happened in less than a few hours. Snap! Again, no action -- we are just told.
Winail
I recently read this book again because it was a selection for my bookclub. I enjoyed it just as much the second time. The story focuses on mothers and daughters, mothers who were Indian immigrants and daughters who were raised in America. The characters each have a unique experience to share, but they are all connected beautifully. I would recommend this book to anyone who enjoys reading about the immigrant experience, as well as those who love stories about the relationships between mothers and their daughters.
Rindyt
I enjoyed reading the stories of joy, and hardship of each family. The cultural changes parents must witness with their first generation American children. However, the lives of the characters transcend any ethnicity because in the end we are all human beings.
Alister
Really enjoyed this book, and the recipes included in it. Will pass it on to friends, but not before I've copied these out! It's the story of very well educated Indians who came to the States in the 60's and their families, up to the present time. Sometimes funny, others heart-rending, I enjoyed every moment of the stories.
Tantil
The Hindi-Bindi Club started off interesting, but went downhill. I'm not sure exactly why. Maybe it's because I couldn't get into any of the characters. The younger generation of women seemed stuck up.
I found myself rushing to get to the end of The Hindi-Bindi Club.
One thing I did like about this book was the information about some of India's history.
I've read The Joy Luck Club, and feel that was better.
hulk
wonderful book. Set in Washington where I spent almost 40 years raising 3 daughters. I could relate to the Hindi-Bindi club, as most South Asian mothers and daughters can. Written beautifully, I hung on to every sentence. Totally brilliant. Has Monica P. written any other books?
Fordregelv
Interesting depiction of children of Indian parents growing up in America and the cultural differences that cause tension in the family relationships because of the "old world" Indian values versus the "new world" American values.
fun book to read. love the girls and their mothers recipes and of course the long lasting love stories with happily ever after marriages

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