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by Daniel Easterman

  • ISBN: 0586210881
  • Author: Daniel Easterman
  • ePub ver: 1285 kb
  • Fb2 ver: 1285 kb
  • Rating: 4.3 of 5
  • Language: English
  • Pages: 608
  • Publisher: Grafton / Harper Collins; New Ed edition (1993)
  • Formats: docx lit lrf doc
  • Category: Fiction
  • Subcategory: Genre Fiction
epub Name of the Beast download

On the eve of the new millennium, religious fundamentalists seize power in Egypt and wage a campaign of terrorism throughout Europe. In 1984, Daniel Easterman (Denis MacEoin) embarked on what was for many years his principal career, writing international thrillers. Under the Easterman name, he has published fifteen novels, many of them best-sellers. Under a second pen-name, Jonathan Aycliffe, he has written a further eight novels, all ghost stories in the classic English tradition.

Easterman has painted an overwhelmingly dark vision of an Egypt literally demolished by a fundamentalist Islamic revolution, a country not only terrorized by religious police - the mutahsibin - but ravaged by the plague and hemmed in by a 50-foot-high wall created with material supplied by the tearing down of the pyramids and other ancient monuments. It is a truly horrifying image, vividly portrayed.

Name of the Beast book. Details (if other): Cancel. Thanks for telling us about the problem. by. Daniel Easterman.

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Men all over the globe are haunting by the same portentous dream. Towering over the heart of the apocalyptic upheaval is a mysterious figure known as al-Qurtubi. Is he the Antichrist?

Plagues sweep North Africa, terrorists lay waste to Europe. Men all over the globe are haunting by the same. Men all over the globe are haunting by the same portentous dream. Is he the Antichrist? The Pope believes so, and is willing to sacrifice everything to defeat him. Only two people can stop al-Qurtubi. A’isha Manfaludi, a beautiful archaeologist and Michael Hunt, a retired British Intelligence agent.

An Alternate History novel set in 1940 in which United States is ruled by a coalition of Charles Lindbergh's America First Committee and the Ku Klux Klan led by .

by. Easterman, Daniel. Terrorists, Intelligence officers. New York : HarperCollins Publishers.

Comments (4)

Fonceiah
Some years back, I read most of Daniel Easterman's novels that were available at the time. Name of the Beast was my favorite, and I read it a few times within a few year span. I've been waiting anxiously for the book to be available digitally, as that's how I now do most of my reading. (Plus my copy of the paperback is now brittle and not likely to stand up to another reading.)

The book doesn't quite live up to my memories. I think there are two different ideas in this novel, and neither is quite as good as it could be. On the one hand, the book is a dark speculative fiction about an extremist Islamic terrorist organization coming to power which, given the current circumstances happening in sections of the Middle East, reads as surprisingly prescient. This part of the book doesn't seem to be explored as deeply as it could, but ultimately the book is a thriller.

And if here that the book doesn't live up to my memory. As a thriller, I found the book decidedly unthrilling. The central characters are passive, stumbling their way through the plot. The "hero" of the tale is largely inconsequential; he spends much of the novel captured or sick. The plot meanders for much of the novel, and then concludes with curious haste.

Not to knock the book too hard though, because it is a brisk, fun read with a few great moments.
Ballardana
Avid fan of Easterman and not disappointed
Atineda
Easterman has painted an overwhelmingly dark vision of an Egypt literally demolished by a fundamentalist Islamic revolution, a country not only terrorized by religious police - the mutahsibin - but ravaged by the plague and hemmed in by a 50-foot-high wall created with material supplied by the tearing down of the pyramids and other ancient monuments. It is a truly horrifying image, vividly portrayed. The lead characters are interesting and well-rounded, and Mr. Easterman is clearly intimately acquainted with Cairo and its environs. His expertise in Arabic and other Middle Eastern languages also contributes to his portrayal of the culture.
However, I think the motivation of his villain, al-Qurtubi, is rather thin, especially this Spanish former priest's reason for converting from Catholicism to Islam. The story goes to some lengths to identify al-Qurtubi as the Biblical Anti-Christ, but then does very little to follow through on how his particular actions fit that identification. And there's a whole big build-up of dreams and historical prophecies having to do with a mysterious black pyramid, which is eventually produced from under the sands of the desert, but it only serves as a brief setting for a plot to kidnap the Pope - the pyramid itself seems to have no other significance. The majority of the story concerns the trials and tribulations of the hero and heroine as they try to escape the religious police and various henchmen of al-Qurtubi.
To me, one of the weaknesses of the story is the assumption that the forces of the Islamic revolution would be able to instantly assume complete control of an entire country and coerce millions of people into labor gangs that tear down the pyramids literally overnight and build a 50-foot-high wall around the country, while closing hospitals and suppressing the news that plague is raging and thousands of people are being arbitrarily shot for simple things like reading a translation of "The Tale of Two Cities". I am in the unusual position of having been through the Islamic revolution in Iran in 1979, so I can vouch for the suppression of things like music, nightclubs and movies; but I can also tell you that a brand new, untrained government does not do anything in a very efficient or organized manner - not even the persecution of foreigners suspected of being spies! (And Iran wasn't suffering the additional whammy of a plague!) I have trouble believing his bad guys would have had this kind of total control over any country. Other than that, my principal problem with this story is that it is so extremely dark that it was difficult to make myself keep reading.
Runeterror
A chilling portrayal of religious fanaticism run amuck. It seemed all too real, at times generating a palpable sense of discomfort and fear. Taking into account the times we live in and the fact that this book was written 11 years ago, the plausibility of the story seems less and less extreme. A genuine page-turner with finely etched characters and a dramatic sense of place and atmosphere. Mr. Easterman's expert knowledge of the region, the culture, religion and language are put to exemplary use in this fantastic journey into a world shaken to its very foundation by madness and violence. My sole complaint involves the ending, which seems a bit rushed and forced, but, nevertheless, does not wholly disappoint. Highly recommended.

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