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by Michael Ford

  • ISBN: 075284976X
  • Author: Michael Ford
  • ePub ver: 1864 kb
  • Fb2 ver: 1864 kb
  • Rating: 4.1 of 5
  • Language: English
  • Pages: 400
  • Publisher: Orion (2003)
  • Formats: rtf doc lit lrf
  • Category: Fiction
  • Subcategory: Genre Fiction
epub Gods and Legions download

Michael Curtis Ford is a translator and novelist. Then getting the Loeb's three volume Ammianus Marcellinus and reading that while I read Gods and Legions a second and then a third and then a forth time

Michael Curtis Ford is a translator and novelist. He has bachelor's degrees from the University of Washington and a graduate degree from Princeton. Then getting the Loeb's three volume Ammianus Marcellinus and reading that while I read Gods and Legions a second and then a third and then a forth time. There's a part in there, and I won't blow it for you, that sent chills up my spine when I read it. This is one of those I accidently tripped over while in Walmart.

Gods and Legions book. I am presently close to finishing Gods and Legions by Michael Curtis Ford and appreciated his very personal portrayal of the Roman Emperor Julian. In the year, 354 .  . I do wish his narrative character, Caesarius, a Christian physician and longtime friend of Julian, had been more understanding of the followers of the ancient religions rather than behave as the typically intolerant believer of the period bu I like historical novels that develop the individual characters rather than focus on just a series of events.

Michael Curtis Ford is forty-two years old and is a translator and novelist. He and his wife educate their two children at home. Библиографические данные. Gods and Legions: A Novel of the Roman Empire.

Outstanding praise for Michael Curtis Ford's The Ten Thousand: The . Ford brings an interesting, fictively personal outlook to one of the classics. A swift, often brutal, and thoroughly compelling novel. It is a book that makes the reader feel the story has been lived, not merely read.

Ford brings an interesting, fictively personal outlook to one of the classics. Inspired and highly informed, The Ten Thousand may lead many readers back to the original. -The Statesmen Journal.

For rather than accepting Julian's son as his heir, the Emperor could simply declare a divorce and take a new wife who could produce a son – hence her betrayal. Julian bid me tell no one of what I had learned from Matilda

I am a fan of Michael Curtis Ford since reading his book "The Ten Thousand". Gods and Legions" is even better in my opinion.

I am a fan of Michael Curtis Ford since reading his book "The Ten Thousand". Those parts of the book are thrilling to read and he paints a vivid picture of what it might have been like. It is also about religion, ambition, power, and mysticysm

Of all the great figures of antiquity, few are so compelling yet enigmatic, few so admired yet vilified, as Flavius Claudius Julianus Augustus, the man known to history as Julian the Apostate. From Gregory of Nazianzus, a devoted servant of the Church, To the Holy Pontiff, Pope Siricius, beloved of God and condemner of heretics, defender of the True Faith and heir to the throne of the blessed Saint Peter in Rome: Grace and mercy be upon you.

Comments (7)

Via
This is one of my all time favorite books and one of the few I've read four times for the pure enjoyment of it. Including the second time around after reading it and learning that some of the information comes from an actual roman soldier who served under Julian "the apostate". Then getting the Loeb's three volume Ammianus Marcellinus and reading that while I read Gods and Legions a second and then a third and then a forth time.

There's a part in there, and I won't blow it for you, that sent chills up my spine when I read it.

This is one of those I accidently tripped over while in Walmart. One of those "just for the heck of it" purchases. Since then I've read all his other books and am now frustrated wondering why he hasn't written any other books. He's right there with Steven Pressfield as far as I'm concerned.
Coiriel
I have become a fan of historical fiction over the past ten years. This is due to my non fiction research into the collapse of complex societies. Well researched and well crafted historical fiction lends a palpable taste of the actual period and a feeling for the human side to what my historical reading lacks. An author like Michael Curtis Ford has the natural ability and talent for creating fictional reality that is in line with historical facts about the times his fictional stories take place. In historical fiction, it is not just the tale and entertainment for me as much as my belief that the author can really imagine and then visualize the life and behaviors of his characters. His ability to make be believe in his characters within the bounds of his books is second to none. I have read every one of his historical fiction starting with "Gods and Legions: A Novel of the Roman Empire". I was captured and immediately read every piece of fiction I could find by Mr Ford. He never disappointed. This talent is something that I have often regretted that I do not possess.
blodrayne
This is the story of Julian. After centuries of persecution, the Roman Empire became Christian. Then the Christians decided it was their turn to persecute the pagans. Julian was a champion of the old gods, but also believed in religious tolerance, which got him killed by his own troops. He was probably a good man, but his attempt to attack the Persian Empire, which resulted in his death, was a foolish attempt at vainglory. Not a happy tale.
Westened
Emperor Julian is one of the most controversial figures of the late Roman / early Christian period. He stands alone in that he tried to reverse the Empire's adoption of Christianity as a state religion. For this he is loathed by the Church (which named him the Apostate) and worshiped by the most romantic admirers of the Classical Period.
Michael Curtis Ford has attempted to unravel Julian's complex personality and interpret his actions by delving deep into his early childhood and experiences as the military leader of the armies of Gaul. He then follows him through his ascention to the throne and his agressive slide into increasingly erratic and controversial behaviour towards the end of his life.
The journey is very enjoyable. Ford writes the political intrigue, the fight to defend Gaul and the young commander's development very well indeed. The Empire's progressive stagnation can be felt, the conflicts between the old and new ideals are quickly outlined. So, the first two thirds of the book, or so, are really quite good.
Unfortunatelly, towards the end, where the novel reaches the most controversial aspects of the story, Ford seems to run out of steam. Or perhaps, he is reluctant to offend mainstream sensibilities. The narrative becomes rather one-sided, using mostly the viewpoints of Christian clerics to describe Julian's actions and interpret his motives. He quite innexplicably turns from a tolerant, cultured "philosopher king" to a bloodthirsty pagan ruler, bent on continuous sacrifices, and fanatical worshiping of forgotten deities, under the influence of a malicious dwarf!
In this the book fails to convince. For example, a bit of background on the religious upheaval and continuous state-sponsored prosecutions of the preceding 50 years or so would have shed some light on the situation and help the reader understand Julian's transformation - yet none is given. Instead, the Emperor's behaviour is simply attributed to a deseased mind, poisoned from having harboured feelings of vengeanace for years (his family was murdered) and the story quickly rushes to an end.
If your interest lies in Julian and his story, this novel is going to dissapoint you. However, if you are simply a fan of the period and love reading about Rome and the Romans, you will certainly enjoy it.
Nalme
I found this book to be remarkably well written. I thought it dealt with the subject matter, the life of Julian, in a very clever and very readable manner by making the narrative of the history of this fascinating character told by his personal physician. There were some passages that didn't quite work for me under this format but all in all I think the device works well in that it gives the reader a reason to believe in the more fictional parts of this historical novel if one can allow that this retelling is done by someone who would have had close and constant personal contact with the great man being described. If you enjoy Roman history and a well told story about a pivotal time in that history, you will enjoy this book undoubtedly.
Shem
Bought this for my son because it was on his summer reading list. He asked me to to post that it's a slow moving book that was very hard to read...not because it was too advanced, because he couldn't get into it and was bored to tears.
Anarasida
If you read Ford's earlier work "The Ten Thousand" you will be interested in this book. While not as compelling as "The Ten Thousand", it does give you a glimpse at the later stages of the Roman Empire, after Christianity takes hold. I found it enlightening.

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