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by Anita Amirrezvani

  • ISBN: 0316065773
  • Author: Anita Amirrezvani
  • ePub ver: 1834 kb
  • Fb2 ver: 1834 kb
  • Rating: 4.1 of 5
  • Language: English
  • Pages: 400
  • Publisher: Back Bay Books; Reprint edition (May 2, 2008)
  • Formats: azw lrf lrf lit
  • Category: Fiction
  • Subcategory: Genre Fiction
epub The Blood of Flowers: A Novel download

It was here and then that Shah Abbas choose to bring together the traditional arts and artisans of Persia to weave the most beautiful carpets ever woven. The story tells of a poor but talented young woman from the provinces who arrives in Isfahan with her ailing mother and is taken under the wing of a distant relative, one of the most able rug makers of the day.

The Blood of Flowers book. Shah Abbas (reign from Anita Amirrezvani has in this novel of historical fiction told of life during the reign of Shah Abbas the Great of Persia

The Blood of Flowers book. Anita Amirrezvani’s The Blood of Flowers is a skillfully crafted coming-of-age story of a young girl in seventeenth-century Persia. To adhere to a feature of traditional folk tales, the girl remains nameless. She lives in a small village with her parents, surrounded by friends and neighbors. Shah Abbas (reign from Anita Amirrezvani has in this novel of historical fiction told of life during the reign of Shah Abbas the Great of Persia. It is thoroughly engaging.

THE BLOOD OF FLOWERS is a mesmerizing historical novel about a young . Anita Amirrezvani was born in Iran but has lived in the USA since she was a young child.

THE BLOOD OF FLOWERS is a mesmerizing historical novel about a young Iranian woman whose destiny changes on the sudden death of her father. Forced to leave their village, the woman and her mother travel to the beautiful city of Isfahan, where they are taken in by an uncle, a wealthy carpet designer, and his unsympathetic wife. Fascinating, totally original and utterly gripping' Esther Freud. positively glows on the page, and the characterisation is similarly acute, notably of the wonderfully drawn heroine.

Home Anita Amirrezvani The Blood of Flowers. Except as permitted under the . The blood of flowers, . Little, Brown and Company. 237 Park Avenue, New York, NY 10017. Visit our Web site at ww. achetteBookGroup. The Little, Brown and Company name and logo are trademarks of Hachette Book Group, Inc.

Электронная книга "The Blood of Flowers: A Novel", Anita Amirrezvani

Электронная книга "The Blood of Flowers: A Novel", Anita Amirrezvani. Эту книгу можно прочитать в Google Play Книгах на компьютере, а также на устройствах Android и iOS. Выделяйте текст, добавляйте закладки и делайте заметки, скачав книгу "The Blood of Flowers: A Novel" для чтения в офлайн-режиме.

New York : Back Bay Books, Little, Brown and Co. Collection. inlibrary; printdisabled; ; china.

The Blood of Flowers. by Anita Amirrezvani. The Blood of Flowers is simply a stunning debut. One can't help but want to return to the charming main narrator and the entrancing tale of her quest for independence and self-reliance, her daring and honest exploration of love and desire for love, and above all the profound discovery, as Gostaham reminds her, that she "must begin to understand own worth. USA Today - Ann Oldenburg. Like one of the dazzling, meticulously tied rugs in the Iranian bazaar, The Blood of Flowers is filled with intricate designs, vivid colors and sparkling gems.

Anita Amirrezvani has provided us with a superb effort in her very first novel, The Blood of Flowers. This book is also a coming of age story as the young girl moves to womanhood and especially, discovers the pleasures of the flesh. In fact, The Blood of Flowers is one of the best books that I've read this year. The Blood of Flowers is seen through the eyes of a 14 year old village girl who lives in 17th Century Persia. Amirrezvani wants her readers to see the true beauty of Iran. She paints a vivid picture of the beautiful Isfahan with her river, her bridges, her mosques, her gardens, her bazaar and her hammams. She also details the food, dress and customs of the day.

The Blood of Flowers by Anita Amirrezvani Our book club read this and it was very interesting

The Blood of Flowers by Anita Amirrezvani Our book club read this and it was very interesting. After her father dies without leaving her with a dowry, a seventeenth-century Persian teen becomes a servant to her wealthy rug designer uncle in the court of Shah Abbas the Great, where her weaving talents prove both a blessing and curse. But I have always believed great books have great cover art. It's never failed me so far. The Blood of Flowers, Anita Amirrezvani. Discover ideas about Audiobooks.

The Blood of Flowers is a rich historical story of one woman's struggle to overcome. A conversation with the author of The Blood of Flowers Anita Amirrezvani talks about inspirations, Iran, and th. . shape of palm trees, he focused on refashioning the city of Isfahan into the. T HE BLOOD OF FLOWERS f. A n ov e L b y. Anita amirrezvani. A conversation with the author of The Blood of Flowers Anita Amirrezvani talks about inspirations, Iran, and the origins of her first novel The Blood of Flowers is a rich historical story of one woman’s struggle to overcome misfortune. What was your inspiration for this novel? One of my main concerns was to provide a more nuanced view of Iran.

A sensuous and richly-imagined historical novel that centers on a skilled young carpet weaver, her arranged marriage, and her quest for self-determination in 17th-century Persia.In 17th-century Iran, a 14-year-old woman believes she will be married within the year. But when her beloved father dies, she and her mother find themselves alone and without a dowry. With nowhere else to go, they are forced to sell the brilliant turquoise rug the young woman has woven to pay for their journey to Isfahan, where they will work as servants for her uncle, a rich rug designer in the court of the legendary Shah Abbas the Great.Despite her lowly station, the young woman blossoms as a brilliant designer of carpets, a rarity in a craft dominated by men. But while her talent flourishes, her prospects for a happy marriage grow dim. Forced into a secret marriage to a wealthy man, the young woman finds herself faced with a daunting decision: forsake her own dignity, or risk everything she has in an effort to create a new life.
Comments (7)

CrazyDemon
Information about rugs, carpets and tapestries is easy to find. There are many books, old and new, that provide facts and wonderfully vivid images. What I found harder to find was a readable book of fiction with-rug making as an integral part. Why bother, you ask? Well, I don’t think rugs, carpets and tapestries, like any great art form, can be entirely separated from the culture that produced them without severely limiting their impact on our senses.

Any acceptable history of Persia can tell you that the golden age of Persian Carpets was during the reign of Shah Abbas I (1787-1629). Besides facts, these history books can even display images of some of the magnificent carpets still remaining from that period. The carpets are still beautiful, their colors imbued with the weathered warmth of age. But what these books and their images cannot do is justice to the period itself. That justice, like the carpets themselves, takes an artist. Anita Amirrezvani is such an artist…

Her book, The Blood of Flowers brings life to the Sixteenth Century capital of Persia, Isfahan. It was here and then that Shah Abbas choose to bring together the traditional arts and artisans of Persia to weave the most beautiful carpets ever woven. The story tells of a poor but talented young woman from the provinces who arrives in Isfahan with her ailing mother and is taken under the wing of a distant relative, one of the most able rug makers of the day.

To put it mildly, life in those enlightened times for a young woman was anything but easy. As ever, the poor suffered the most. Marriage was out of the question unless the girl could provide a dowry. A life of servitude with a kind master was the best she could hope for. But as always, some managed to lift themselves out of the mire. Our heroine is one of those; in spite of calamities, setbacks and humiliations galore, she manages to make a meaningful and productive life for herself.

And carpet making is integral to her story. As mentioned earlier, Shah Abbas brought carpet makers and other artisans from across Persia into Isfahan with the intent of producing great carpets for commercial purposes as well as his own pleasure. These artisans from the various carpet making regions brought their traditions with them and it is that combination of traditions and artisans that makes this period so artistically fruitful.

I don’t know if the author of The Blood of Flowers intended that the storyline mirror the Shah’s actions during this period or not, but I’m satisfied that it did. Like the artisans called to Isfahan by Shah Abbas five hundred years ago, this young woman left her small farming village in southwest Persia where she wove carpets based on local themes with homespun materials and took her talent to the cosmopolitan, eclectic center of the Middle-Eastern Art world. It was there in the great city of Isfahan, amidst the competitive commercial workshops and the royal ateliers with their accomplished artisans and gold thread that her own talent found full expression.

I really enjoyed reading The Blood of Flowers. For me the book was more than a book, it was an experience, and I feel like I actually spent time in the carpet workshops and royal ateliers of Sixteenth Century Persia watching the creation of the most wonderful rugs ever woven--a sense you can't get from a history book, no matter how fact-filled.
Nikojas
I could not put this book down! Not only was this novel entertaining, I learned a lot about 17th century Persia, specifically the city of Ishtafan, of which I had never heard but is a spectacular city!
The unnamed lead character is well developed and her maturity grows with each page.
I learned about the customs and life of Persia and much about carpet making. I now appreciate my Oriental carpets much more with the author's description of carpet creation.
The colors and patterns come alive through the author's descriptions and I could experience the smells and sounds and intense sunlight of this ancient land.
Doulkree
More reviews at <a href="http://www.creating-serenity.com/">Creating Serenity</a>

This wouldn't have been a book that I would have purchased for myself but I was pleasantly surprised with it. I had a lot of ill feelings and thoughts because the synopsis makes it seem like the main character is going to go through hell, and trust me she does, but it is not quite as dire as I first thought and my unease drifted away as I read.

The story is actually a magnificent one, although, maybe a little drawn out at the beginning. But the plot itself is quite interesting as we follow our main character through some rough times and through some bad choices of her own, and some from others. I was quite interested not only in her but also her life. I really liked her and even though the story didn't flow quite effortlessly, my want to know more out weighed the desire to put the book down.

I think the smaller stories in between the plot threw me off quite a bit as well. Although they made me curious, sometimes they didn't seem to have any reason whatsoever for being told in this particular book. By the end some of them made sense while others seemed to just be placed in the story for fluff.

There are some situations where some of the minor characters just make me want to pull my hair out, but they are all very well written. I really enjoyed reading about her uncle the most, although I wish he had a bit more of a backbone but he was a saving grace in her life, for sure!

All in all, especially for being a book I normally would not have picked up, this was a total surprise. I'm really excited that we read this for my book club and I'm sure I will read more from this author.

3.5 / 5
Lucam
This book is shockingly excellent. I picked it up figuring "it's about rugs, it probably won't be exciting", but once started, I can barely put it down. The descriptions are rich and the city really comes to life with the author's fine phrasing. Even rug-making, something I have zero interest in, was rendered fascinating by the skill of Amirrezvani. The location comes alive as well, transporting you to 17th century Iran quite effectively. I absolutely loved this book and wish I'd read it sooner.

Throughout my reading of this book, I was reminded of The Book on Fire by Keith Miller (without the issues of exoticization that book had). So if you liked that one, perhaps you'll also like this one.

More reviews at: https://www.goodreads.com/parfois

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