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by David Jack Bell,Grá Linnaea,Vincent Pendergast,Shock Totem

  • ISBN: 1453636005
  • Author: David Jack Bell,Grá Linnaea,Vincent Pendergast,Shock Totem
  • ePub ver: 1991 kb
  • Fb2 ver: 1991 kb
  • Rating: 4.9 of 5
  • Language: English
  • Pages: 82
  • Publisher: CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform (July 1, 2010)
  • Formats: lit docx mbr azw
  • Category: Fiction
  • Subcategory: Genre Fiction
epub Shock Totem 2: Curious Tales of the Macabre and Twisted download

The long-awaited second issue of Shock Totem features new fiction from David Jack Bell, Cate Gardner, Vincent . Shock Totem is definitely a different mix from the other issues I've read

The long-awaited second issue of Shock Totem features new fiction from David Jack Bell, Cate Gardner, Vincent Pendergast. Shock Totem is definitely a different mix from the other issues I've read. This issue had a much starker vibe coming from it, thanks in large part to the stand-out stories I mentioned. The stories, as you read them, kind of spill out like brackish water with very nasty treasures writhing beneath the surface. I still like Shock Totem the best, but this is a close second, and I still have issues and left to read. 3 people found this helpful.

Shock Totem is definitely a different mix from the other issues I've read. Follow a beautiful and twisted folklore tale in The Rainbow Serpent. Observe a deadly little girl who just wants to pick a flower in Pretty Little Ghouls.

Howling Through the Keyhole. This reason is simple: Mercedes is now part of the Shock Totem team. A wonderful thing (except for her insisting we wear heels and apple-red lipstick around the office). Welcome to the second issue of Shock Totem! About time, right? I know, I know.

The long-awaited second issue of Shock Totem features new fiction from David Jack Bell, Cate Gardner, Vincent Pendergast, Leslianne Wilder, and others

The long-awaited second issue of Shock Totem features new fiction from David Jack Bell, Cate Gardner, Vincent Pendergast, Leslianne Wilder, and others.

Shock Totem 2: Curious Tales of the Macabre and Twisted. The long-awaited second issue of Shock Totem features new fiction from David Jack Bell, Cate Gardner, Vincent Pendergast, Leslianne Wilder, and others.

The long-awaited second issue of Shock Totem features new fiction from David Jack Bell, Cate Gardner, Vincent Pendergast, Leslianne Wilder, and others.

Shock Totem Publications was born in 2008. With the help of John Boden and Nick Contor (and many more in the years to follow), we created Shock Totem magazine, of which there have been a total of thirteen issues to date. Eventually we branched out into books. We produced some great ones, written by equally great authors. And so very soon the following books, including two that were forthcoming from Shock Totem Publications, will have a new home at Apex Publications

New Shock Totem celebrates its ninth issue, featuring fantastic tales of nightmares, monsters, ghosts, and severed digits Inside you will find not only a brand new, previously unpublished tale by Stephen Graham Jones, but also an interview with this mod. Specifications.

New Shock Totem celebrates its ninth issue, featuring fantastic tales of nightmares, monsters, ghosts, and severed digits Inside you will find not only a brand new, previously unpublished tale by Stephen Graham Jones, but also an interview with this mod. Shock Totem Publications. ENG. Number of Pages.

Manufacturer: Shock Totem Publications Release date: 20 November 2011 ISBN-10 : B006B0SBMC.

The long-awaited second issue of Shock Totem features new fiction from David Jack Bell, Cate Gardner, Vincent Pendergast, Leslianne Wilder, and others. Also includes nonfiction from Mercedes M. Yardley, a conversation with James Newman, reviews, and more.
Comments (7)

Flocton
IMO, volume 2 had a stronger mix of stories than volume 1 (and, yes, the larger font was easier to read). There wasn't any poetry in this issue, but the book/music/movie reviews were still there (and useful).

My favorite story was "The Rat Burner". It was a deliciously dark and gritty story. I'll have to look up Ricardo Bare's other work.

"Sole Survivor" was a humorous twist on adventure style reality shows.

"Sweepers" was decent but a bit lacking. I was left with too many unanswered questions. A longer story could've filled in those gaps.

"The Rainbow Serpent" was surreal with its horror. I really enjoyed the blending of myth, reality and nightmare.

"Abominations: Hide the Sickness", a non-fiction piece, was creepy. It also made me wonder if it's worth it to keep certain people incarcerated for life. I'm not sure they're human anymore.

"Pretty Little Ghouls" was a short bizarro piece. I liked it.

"Messages from Valerie Polichar" is a nice little ghost story that explores death and social media.

"Return from Dust" held an interesting premise, but I felt the execution left a lot to be desired.

"Leave Me the Way I Was Found" successfully grabs Lovecraft's penchant for not describing horrors that are incomprehensible to the human mind. In this case the author, Christian Dumais, suggests how the world would react to a certain YouTube video. In Lovecraft's day, the dark things were whispered about by a select few. In the Internet Age, no one whispers anymore; they broadcast.

"Upon My Return" had a hint of Bradbury (people forget that he wrote horror too) in the way the story was told. I liked it.

As usual, the cover art is great. Now to pick up issue 3.
Cezel
I'll start off by being honest, I don't think issue 2 of Shock Totem quite lives up to the standard set by the debut issues. But then again, that was a pretty high standard to meet. I do however find issue 2 to be impressive, the quality of the authors involved is astounding, the nonfiction pieces--especially an interview with James Newman and a really fascinating essay by Mercedes M. Yardley--interesting and readable. It seemed to me almost that the majority of the stories in this one had some kind of gimmick or hook--a Survivor-type reality show where you really have to survive, searching for the dead on Facebook, a dead solider brought back as a cyborg, an online video that drives folks insane--and sometimes the hook works beautifully but other times I felt the hook was all the story had going for it.

Still, what this second issue showed me was that the first issue was not a fluke. Wood and company are committed to publishing quality fiction, and what I consider truly impressive, diverse fiction. It's all horror yes, but some of it is psychological, some supernatural, some fantastical. When you sit down with an issue of Shock Totem, you are not going to get the same formula over and over. You're going to get a true collection, and you're always going to be surprised and delighted.
Dusho
Shock Totem released their fifth edition not too long ago, which reminded me that I still had a couple more editions on my to-be-read pile, including this one. It's one of the short fiction markets that is right up my alley with a clear affinity for horror and dark fantasy. This second issue featured a few familiar names for me, and introduced me to many more whose work I hadn't read yet.

Right off the bat, there was Richard Bare's "The Rat Burner," a grim bit of back alley brooding, about a guy who either spends him time in a rat-infested apartment or standing on a street corner getting paid to guide desperate people to a black door in a labyrinth of alleyways. Look up bleak in the dictionary and you'll probably find a quote from this story. Something like: "the girls say they get less customers when there's too many rats."

Leslianne Wilder had a sad and creepy story called "Sweepers," set in a Manhattan that's been submerged by rising waters and overrun by the corpses that haven't quite figured out how to be dead yet. Vincent Pendergast's "The Rainbow Serpeant," which I actually listened to a couple week prior on Pseudopod, is a really fun mix of weird and wicked with a man on a bus trying to get to his girlfriend, only to find himself in the company of strange passengers and an even stranger driver, on a bus that isn't quite what it seems. And the staggering imagery from Cate Gardner's brain makes an appearance with the story of a prisoner with a catastrophic gift in "Pretty Little Ghouls."

The most hard-hitting bit of storytelling comes in the form of a nonfiction piece by Mercedes M. Yardley called "Hide the Sickness," in which she recounts her time working at a home for juvenile sex offenders. The oppressive sense of constantly being looked at by kids as a potential target and victim was enough to make my skin crawl. There's a level of empathy that comes with the idea of kids being so cruelly abused that they themselves become abusers, but it's the kind of situation where my resolve and endurance pale compared to Mercedes.

I've give a nod to "Leave Me the Way I Was Found" by Christian A. Dumais for offering a story that felt like a cross between The Ring and that short story by Stephen King where Alzheimer's becomes an epidemic of his brother's design. Imagine a video on the internet, one of those banal clips you see on YouTube, only this one makes viewers sick in a myriad of ways, some going psychotic, and more becoming suicidal. Would you watch it? Maybe just to see if it was real, and if so, if you were one of the apparent few who can watch it and not wind up dead?

Shock Totem #2 is definitely a different mix from the other issues I've read. This issue had a much starker vibe coming from it, thanks in large part to the stand-out stories I mentioned. The stories, as you read them, kind of spill out like brackish water with very nasty treasures writhing beneath the surface. I still like Shock Totem #4 the best, but this is a close second, and I still have issues #3 and #5 left to read.
Adrierdin
Would you trade all that you are and will be for something? Find out how far people will go to get what they want in Rat-Burner. See how far reality Tv will take us in Sole-Survivor. Or watch the world end in Sweepers. Follow a beautiful and twisted folklore tale in The Rainbow Serpent. Live real life horror in Hide The Sickness. Observe a deadly little girl who just wants to pick a flower in Pretty Little Ghouls. Or follow the ghost in the machine in the odd tale Messages From Valerie Polichar. Travel the darkside on steampunk in Return From Dust. Read a powerful lovecraftian story that will have you searching Youtube against your better judgement in Leave Me The Way I Was Found. Or follow the second coming in Upon My Return. This collection is worth reading.

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