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by David Mamet

  • ISBN: 0413693708
  • Author: David Mamet
  • ePub ver: 1791 kb
  • Fb2 ver: 1791 kb
  • Rating: 4.1 of 5
  • Language: English
  • Pages: 80
  • Publisher: Methuen Drama (February 13, 1995)
  • Formats: mbr mobi lrf lit
  • Category: Fiction
  • Subcategory: Dramas & Plays
epub The Cryptogram (Modern Plays) download

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FREE shipping on qualifying offers. In this gripping short play, David Mamet combines mercurial intelligence with genuinely Hitchcockian menace. The Cryptogram is a journey back into childhood and the moment of its vanishing-the moment when the sheltering world is suddenly revealed as a place full of dangers. On a night in 1959 a boy is waiting to go on a camping trip with his father. His mother wants him to go to sleep. A family friend is trying to entertain them-or perhaps distract them. Because in the dark corners of this domestic scene.

101 pages ; 21 cm. In this gripping short play, David Mamet combines mercurial intelligence with genuinely Hitchcockian menace

101 pages ; 21 cm. The Cryptogram is a journey back into childhood and the moment of its vanishing - the moment when the sheltering world is suddenly revealed as a place full of danger. A family friend is trying to entertain them - or perhaps distract them. Because in the dark corners of this domestic scene, there are rustlings that none of the players want to hear.

The Cryptogram (Modern Plays). Published by Methuen Drama, 1995. From the Back Cover: In this gripping short play, David Mamet combines mercurial intelligence with genuinely Hitchcockian menace

The Cryptogram (Modern Plays). ISBN 10: 0413693708, ISBN 13: 9780413693709. From the Back Cover: In this gripping short play, David Mamet combines mercurial intelligence with genuinely Hitchcockian menace.

David Alan Mamet (/ˈmæmɪt/; born November 30, 1947) is an American playwright, film director, screenwriter and author. He won a Pulitzer Prize and received Tony nominations for his plays Glengarry Glen Ross (1984) and Speed-the-Plow (1988). He first gained critical acclaim for a trio of off-Broadway 1970s plays: The Duck Variations, Sexual Perversity in Chicago, and American Buffalo.

r David Mamet’s newest and perhaps greatest play. A family has lost their way, a company pushed past the breaking point, racism, a terrible crime committed that haunts the characters inexorably, these are just a few of the gut wrenching issues that Mamet confronts unflinchingly. A Hilarious Spoof of A Modern Classic Comedic Improvisers Hunter Nelson & Terry Withers are veteran performers and teachers at some of the most notable improv comedy institutions in the country, including the UCB Theatre, Magnet Theatre, Baltimore Improv Group & Reckless Theatre

1995) A Book by David Mamet.

1995) A Book by David Mamet. This intriguing play is a journey back into childhood and the moment of its vanishing-the moment when the sheltering world is suddenly revealed as a place full of dangers. Title: The Cryptogram.

The Cryptogram, David Mamet The Cryptogram is a play by American playwright David Mamet. The play concerns the moment when childhood is lost. The story is set in 1959 on the night before a young boy is to go on a camping trip with his father. The play premiered in 1994 in London. Feb 06, 2013 Jeff rated it liked it.

In this gripping short play, David Mamet combines mercurial intelligence with genuinely Hitchcockian menace

In this gripping short play, David Mamet combines mercurial intelligence with genuinely Hitchcockian menace.

"I suspect that in time, The Cryptogram will take its place among Mamet's major works" John Lahr "Mamet's play suggests that deception is an endless spiralling process that eventually corrodes the soul. But it also harps on a theme that runs right throughout Mamet's work: the notion that we use words as a destructive social camouflage to lie to others and ourselves...And here through all the repetitions, half sentences and echoing encounter of one question with another, you feel the characters devalue experience through their use of language. As Del cries in desperation at the end, 'If we could speak the truth for one instant, then we would be free.' Mamet's point is that we are held spiritually captive by our bluster and evasions." (Michael Billington, The Guardian)"Dense with thought, feeling and hard psychological insight...There is no spare flesh on this text: words, objects, images interlock in mutual dependence which is both natural and superbly contrived." (John Peter Sunday Times)
Comments (7)

Macill
A fan of Mamet, I've read all but two of his plays. I've enjoyed every single one and this ranks among my favorite. I recommend it to all play-readers and theater lovers around the globe! Especially Mamet fans! Read it and I promise you won't be able to put it down!
Nalmezar
The Cryptogram is outstanding. There are only three characters (that's good for Readers' Theater): a mother, a young boy who is waiting for his father to return and take him on a camping trip, and the mother's and father's gay friend who lives in a motel nearby. The father isn't going to return. For the past week, he's been banging someone in the friend's motel room while the friend hung out elsewhere. When the mother finds out that the friend has deceived her, she flips, but the news about her husband isn't really that surprising.

At the center of the play is the boy and his reaction to his world crumbling around him. With oblique nudges, Mamet lays bare the young child's feelings --inchoate fears and anxieties-- as he waits for a father who will never return. It's prime Mamet --clipped dialogue, emotions hinted as often as laid out on the table. The play would be fun to do: there's not much action. But where would you get a kid who could make so intense but oblique a role believable? It's a difficult role.
Tholmeena
It's too bad this doesn't get the same recognition that Mamet's other works, esp. Glengarry Glen Ross, Speed-the-Plow, and American Buffalo get. I can only agree with the critic cited on the back who believes that "in time it will take its place among Mamet's major works."
Whereas so many of Mamet's other plays seem to be about the same thing but just given different titles (again, StP, GGR, AB) -- and don't get me wrong, I'm not knocking the "F***ing Master," as David Ives refers to him, but think about it, I'm right! -- The Crypotogram is completely uncharacteristic Mamet. It isn't necessarily doing what Mamet does best i.e. capitalism, but nonetheless, I think it's breathtaking.
The construction of the Cryptogram seems so fragile. As only Mamet can do with language, such a compelling spell is created, and it's undeniably intriguing -- the different worlds of adult language vs. children's language. Who has even given such thought to the idea? The idea that "grownups are speaking in code, and that that code may never be breakable" is established so subtly that at first I thought I missed it, I kept waiting for some more concrete dividing line -- but therein is Mamet's gift. To actually hear the language that Del and Donny speak as an adult, while simultaneously imagining hearing it as John might reveals this "code," and it is somewhat unsettling -- just the idea that such a difference exists. Certainly a clever illustration not only of how language can be interpreted differently, but of language's power in general -- to empower, persuade, dissuade, enlighten, shield, to keep in the dark, to be used as a weapon, or as defense, to conceal, and to reveal.
Perhaps one of Mamet's darkest plays, but well-written (so often a rarity) and full of ideas.
Incidentally, I'm a college student and would love to direct this play for my senior project, except it requires a 9 yr old of extraordinary talent, which seem to be in short supply on college campuses.
Gribandis
This play is certainly different than his usual tension and f-bomb filled other ones. It intrigued me but didn't dazzle me. It is a much tougher sell and would be curious to see it performed and see what else would come to life than what is given on the page.
Braned
Mamet rocks.
fr0mTheSkY
Mamet dialogues are almost always fun. There are some plays that can be read and enjoyed. This is not one of them.
Raelin
Brilliant. Heartbreaking!
This is a strange, elliptical play. I did not enjoy it as much as some of the other Mamet maniacs here, but I will admit that, in the months since I've read it, I just can't get it out of my head.
A lot of this play exists in the subtext of the language and in Mamet's clever "uses of the knife." Since it is very hard to imagine it off the page, much of the time it seems like nothing is happening. I would like to see the play performed, but I think it is unlikely. Finding a ten-year-old who can pull off such a complicated role is probably too much of a headache for most theater producers.
This play is, yes, different than a Glen Garry or American Buffalo. But it is still full of Mamet. If the maestro floats your boat, go for it.

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