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epub Moving Serafina download

by Bob Cherry

  • ISBN: 0875653561
  • Author: Bob Cherry
  • ePub ver: 1427 kb
  • Fb2 ver: 1427 kb
  • Rating: 4.5 of 5
  • Language: English
  • Pages: 354
  • Publisher: Texas Christian University Press; First Edition edition (August 28, 2007)
  • Formats: lrf txt azw lrf
  • Category: Fiction
  • Subcategory: Contemporary
epub Moving Serafina download

Moving Serafina book. Late in life, Clayton Elliot faces long-deferred, hard choices.

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Moving Serafina : a novel. by. Cherry, Bob. Publication date. By reuniting Serafina with her mother in Solitario, Clayton hopes to assuage his guilt about her death twenty-five years earlier. 353 pages ; 24 cm. Addeddate. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books. Uploaded by ttscribe24. hongkong on February 10, 2018.

However, whether Clayton moves Serafina immediately or ignores the contracted deadline, either act .

However, whether Clayton moves Serafina immediately or ignores the contracted deadline, either act will trigger drilling into the aquifer for water. His lifelong friends are vehemently opposed to drilling. When a young Mexican woman mysteriously enters his life, Clayton must delay his efforts to move Serafina and surreptitiously help this woman who has illegally crossed into Texas. This decision also raises the ire of Clayton’s friends.

With Moving Serafina, Bob Cherry joins the ranks of the finest writers of the West, such as Elmer Kelton, Robert Flynn, and Max Evans. In this contemporary novel set in the Big Bend country of Southwest Texas, Clayton Elliott must move the grave of his infant daughter from the homestead he sold to water developers before they begin drilling into the aquifer.

The third book in the Serafina series comes out in July 2017. Robert Beatty lives in the Blue Ridge Mountains of Asheville, North Carolina with his wife and three daughters,.

Bob Cherry is an American poet and novelist. Texas Christian University Press, 2007. His works have received many awards and honors, including the 1999 Horizon Award for his debut novel, Spirit of the Raven. ISBN 978-0-87565-356-3.

Discover Book Depository's huge selection of Bob Cherry books online. Free delivery worldwide on over 20 million titles. Lectures on the Growth of Criminal Law in Ancient Communities (1890). Richard Robert Cherry.

Flag as Inappropriate. Little Rains was a 2003 MPBA Adult Fiction Award Finalist and a Denver Post "Notable Book" for 2003, a Runner-up in the TCU Press TEXAS BOOK AWARDS. Are you certain this article is inappropriate? Excessive Violence Sexual Content Political, Social. Bob Cherry is a fiction writer and poet. His works have received many awards and honors, including the 1999 Horizon Award for his first novel, Spirit of the Raven: An Alaskan Novel. Spirit of the Raven: An Alaskan Novel ISBN 665430-6-8.

Late in life, Clayton Elliot faces long-deferred, hard choices. Circumstances force him to bury his recently deceased wife, Adelita, in the little West Texas border town of Solitario instead of next to their three-year old daughter on their hardpan ranch. To pay for Adelita’s cancer treatments, Clayton sold this marginal ranchland to water developers.By reuniting Serafina with her mother in Solitario, Clayton hopes to assuage his guilt about her death twenty-five years earlier. However, whether Clayton moves Serafina immediately or ignores the contracted deadline, either act will trigger drilling into the aquifer for water. His lifelong friends are vehemently opposed to drilling.When a young Mexican woman mysteriously enters his life, Clayton must delay his efforts to move Serafina and surreptitiously help this woman who has illegally crossed into Texas. This decision also raises the ire of Clayton’s friends.Throughout the novel, Clayton struggles with both the internal and external borders of his life. And the eccentric characters of Solitario find they, too, must confront their own geographical, psychological, and racial boundaries.
Comments (7)

Dukinos
Bob Cherry's novels are too tender for him to be labeled a social novelist. Yet, in the great tradition of lasting literature, such as Grapes of Wrath, Bob Cherry--one of the West's most gifted writers--manages to link the anguish of his superb characters with the crippling effects of environmental and political decisions. With perfect gentle pitch, Moving Serafina, delivers a heart-rending, pulse-racing narrative, against a backdrop of two issues threatening to erupt like a volcano in America's Heartland; immigrants from Mexico and water rights.

The wonder of Cherry's abilities, is that all the reader really cares about in Moving Serafina is the outcome of tragically entrapped Clay Elliot's attempts to move his baby daughter's grave. Yet, one also finishes the book with a profound understanding of the charged multiple stances on border crossings, and an awareness of the looming earth-shaking fight over water rights. Moving Serafina is a triumphant testimony to the gritty nobility of men and women linked in a common cause. Cherry deftly weaves in Clay's all too human friends, the aging beauty, Jovita Seals (a past love), and a haunting terror-stricken young Mexican woman.
Jaiarton
I was hooked right from the beginning. I took this book on vacation because I knew I would have plenty of time between flights to read. I found myself not wanting to put it down and even thinking about what was going to happen next when I wasn't reading it. I even shed a tear in the airport while reading about Clayton's plight to save his baby Serafina. The author made it so easy to put yourself in the main character's shoes and feel his pain in his attempt to come to terms with his daughter's death, and to fulfill his wife's last wishes.

This is a moving story about family, friends, drought and illegal immigration. I wouldn't hesitate for a second to recommend this novel.
dermeco
As a reader, there is no end to the turning of pages. Sometimes we find elegance in the prose, sometimes mystery. The variety of experience is vast, no doubt of that. But what I look for as a reader, every time I pick up a new book, hold it just to feel its weight, carefully open it to the title page, is to discover, one more time, how the human heart fares through all of this.

In the reading of, "Moving Serafina," we encounter a man guilty of neglect. Clay's guilt is enough that for some it would be unendurable. But in this book, the human heart is strong, and Clay's friends remain loyal with a compassion that doesn't need to be spoken. A place was provided, when Clay needed to bring his wife into town to be close to her doctor. His friends were there when he buried her.

Perhaps loyalty is compassion. Both are heart rendered and present as Clay makes amends for the neglect that had separated his own child from her mother. The same qualities guide the actions of Clay and his friends as they easily distinguish between what is legal and what is humane and have no hesitance in coming to the aid of a young Mexican woman who has lost her child. Loyalty and compassion guide the spirits of these twentieth century West Texans as they face the realities of water shortage and corporate greed, and the need to protect the resources for those with whom they share the land. Their strength is in their consistency. The same courage that molds their relationships in the community guides their decision making when they face the encroachment of outsiders who would endanger their way of life.

The more time I spend with this book, the more respect I have for Clay's way of being, his truthful acceptance of error, and yet his willingness to let life continue its unfolding. Clay acknowledges the past; he sees the threats of social change, but he lives every mile he drives his old pick up truck truly in the present.

"Moving Serafina" is the work of a skilled novelist who moves us along a path of commitment through the resolution of old wounds, to the meeting of new challenges and the establishment of new patterns. Bob Cherry represents once more in this novel, as he has in all of his work, that the qualities of the heart are reliable guides, and that here, in the little town of Solitario, the heart survives to create a new day.
Taun
The rugged, hot and dry southwest is the setting for another great novel by Bob Cherry. From a tragic event, there is woven a story that blends contemporary themes such as illegal immigration and water rights.
The long suffering main character strives to achieve his goal with a diverse chorus of loyal friends. Challenged by villans (read big business) he rises to the occasion with some special and unexpected help.
The end of each chapter leaves you with the anticipation to read more. As always, Mr Cherry leads us around many corners, with surprises constantly arising.
Haal
Being a native West Texan, I can relate to the harsh, arid country that the ranchers and people endured to scratch out a living in this novel, Moving Serafina.

Mr. Cherry's latest book is a real page-turner with such believable characters. Clayton's ordeal on the ranch during his life is very typical of a rancher in the Southwest. His love and obligation for his family depicts a real-life cowboy. Clayton's concern with moving his daughter to rest in peace near her mother was not the only thing he had on his mind. He wanted to make sure that the other ranchers and his friends were not taken advantage of by big business water interests.

Mr. Cherry has shown once again that he has a great deal of knowledge about West Texas and the loyalty of the folks living there. His novels just keep getting better - keep writing about West Texas!
Marilore
As a former High School English student of Bob Cherry, I am so impressed with his work. A novel must catch me within the first few pages to pique my interest. "Moving Serefina" not only piqued my interested, it totally captured me. I found myself not wanting to put the book down due to the fixation I had on the storyline. More often than not, I totally forgot that it was Bob writing. I was reading because I loved the story, not because I knew the writer. What an awesome read. If we were still back in English class I would imagine that this work would be one that we could and should be requred to read. Thanks Bob for such a wonderful story.

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