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epub Yoga For People Who Can't Be Bothered To Do It download

by Geoff Dyer

  • ISBN: 0316725072
  • Author: Geoff Dyer
  • ePub ver: 1260 kb
  • Fb2 ver: 1260 kb
  • Rating: 4.5 of 5
  • Language: English
  • Pages: 256
  • Publisher: Vintage. (2004)
  • Formats: rtf lrf lit txt
  • Category: Fiction
  • Subcategory: Contemporary
epub Yoga For People Who Can't Be Bothered To Do It download

This is how Geoff Dyer writes: as if he is a friend filling you in on "Then a hustler with wayward and unkempt . I can see how this book would annoy some

This is how Geoff Dyer writes: as if he is a friend filling you in on "Then a hustler with wayward and unkempt eyes accosted us. "D'you speak English?" he wanted to know. I can see how this book would annoy some. It is incredibly self-indulgent, as Dyer writes with surprising honesty about his sexual conquests and drug adventures, all the while complaining about how boring it is to be a writer, traveling, with nothing to do but drugs and women. Unlike George Saunders, who, in"The Braindead Megaphone", writes travel sketches that reach out and yearn to understand others and improve the world, Dyer looks inward and yearns to understand the complex mess that is himself.

Jonathan Glancey is entranced by the looping trajectory of Geoff Dyer's travel story Yoga for People Who Can't Be Bothered to Do It.

Jonathan Glancey is entranced by the looping trajectory of Geoff Dyer's travel story Yoga for People Who Can't Be Bothered to Do I. .

This is not a book about yoga. Geoff Dyer takes you along to Burning Man Festival/happening in Nevada, Manila, Amsterdam, Rome, New Orleans, Detroit, beaches, temples, vast open spaces

This is not a book about yoga. Geoff Dyer takes you along to Burning Man Festival/happening in Nevada, Manila, Amsterdam, Rome, New Orleans, Detroit, beaches, temples, vast open spaces. Reading this book made me want to read other books by the same author. 2 people found this helpful. Seriously, how hard it is to proofread an e-book and check it's the same as the paper book. In a time of publishers defending the . 9 price, they are going to have to be a little more careful than this.

Geoff Dyer had always wanted to write a book about D. H. Lawrence. Drawing on photos, anecdotes, and, most important, the way he hears the music, Dyer imaginatively reconstructs scenes from the embattled live. The Missing of the Somme. He wanted, in fact, to write his "Lawrence book. The problem was, he had no idea what his "Lawrence book" would be, though he was determined to write a "sober academic study. Luckily for. Selected Essays. by John Berger · Geoff Dyer.

Summary: From Amsterdam to Cambodia, from Rome to Indonesia, from New Orleans to Libya, and from Detroit to Ko Pha-Ngan, Geoff Dyer finds himself both floundering about in a sea of grievances and finding moments of transcendental calm. This aberrant quest for peak experiences leads, ultimately, to the Black Rock Desert in Nevada, where, to quote Tarkovsky's Stalker, 'your most cherished desire will come true'.

Dyer himself "just liked it as a title"

Dyer himself "just liked it as a title". The New Yorker has said of the English-born Dyer that he's "a restless polymath and an irresistibly funny storyteller, adept at fiction, essay, and reportage, but happiest when twisting all three into something entirely his own". In short, Dyer can't sit still, physically (he's Mr Peripatetic) or intellectually (he has "the tendency to narratively turn on a dime", as one interviewer put it).

Yoga for People Who Can't Be Bothered to Do It – електронна книга, написана от Geoff Dyer

Yoga for People Who Can't Be Bothered to Do It – електронна книга, написана от Geoff Dyer. Прочетете я посредством приложението Google Play Книги на компютъра си или на устройство с Android или iOS. Изтеглете „Yoga for People Who Can't Be Bothered to Do It, за да четете офлайн, да откроявате текст, да добавяте отметки или да си водите бележки по време на четене.

The upper right hand corner of the back cover says Travel/Memoir. I suppose this is accurate, but it’s less about the travels and more about numerous journeys over ten years pursuing nothing in particular. Is the book describing a journey home, or is it merely a collection of travel stories? Dyer’s travels to different places in the world include a lot of things: humor, truths, great dialogue, snippets of poetry and philosophy. As all good travelers know, it is the ugliness, the unexpected, the inconvenient that make the best and the funniest travel stories.

When I read Yoga for People Who Can’t Be Bothered to Do It five years ago, it was a revelatory experience. Indeed, it had such an impact on me that it inaugurated a seriously rocky period in my relationship with my then-fiancée, almost convincing me to call the whole thing off and travel the world alone. I thought for a moment about Lawrence Osborne, who I have always sort of compared to Dyer, at least to the extent that both writers transmute their experiences on the road into literature.

Comments (7)

Yayrel
Hilarious travel journal notes. This is not a book about yoga. Geoff Dyer takes you along to Burning Man Festival/happening in Nevada, Manila, Amsterdam, Rome, New Orleans, Detroit, beaches, temples, vast open spaces. Reading this book made me want to read other books by the same author.
Nenayally
I read Dyer before, and wanted to read more of him. I read the reviews of this book, and determined that *I* would be one of the ones who liked the book. He is a really good and clever writer, but after the first few essays, I lost interest. I thought, Here's a super-smart, privileged guy who gets to travel a lot, gets to get laid a lot, and gets to publish books about his own navel-gazing. Admittedly, the navel-gazing can be very shrewd, attentive, insightful, and funny (that's when the book was working for me), but after awhile, the material and the insights became very samey; and I just didn't care about the guy's "plight," if it can be called that, of being discontent and not being able to accomplish the writing he would like to. I basically skimmed the second half of the book.

What I *did* like, and notated in the book, are some passages that really shine. One rhetorical trademark of his is to write an experience, a moment, in a visual, kind of swirling and visceral way that is really quite beautiful - as in beautiful and effective writing. Also, he has a knack for writing about looking at himself looking at himself looking at himself in a kind of "Allegory of the Cave" mind-***k, which is also very well-done. So that's where the 3 starts comes in. I'm glad for those bits, but I would not have missed them had I chosen *not* to read this.
Agarus
Not a collection of eleven desultory wanderings but a single story of Dyer's descent into what here in the States we might call a "midlife crisis" (Dyer never uses the phrase) which finds him in a slough of despond at age 42, his life having crumbled into thousands of discrete unrelated panic-filled seconds with no comic thread. Follows then his discovery of that thread at Burning Man and his detailed description of how personal time and space are pulled together in his head, his very special head and his wide-open willingness to share its exploration with us. So: a self-help book after all.
Zeks Horde
Kind of a weird read but somewhat interesting. Haven't read anything else from this author so didn't have any expectations.
Yozshujind
The book is great, but the kindle edition is terrible. There are errors on almost every page (capitalization, missing letters, etc). Seriously, how hard it is to proofread an e-book and check it's the same as the paper book. In a time of publishers defending the 9.99 price, they are going to have to be a little more careful than this.
Der Bat
I laughed so hard reading Out of Sheer Rage that I almost injured myself. So I was primed to love this collection of travel essays, and did. Dyer is hilarious and incredibly insightful, quite a combination. And then he unleashes the most amazing meditation on (or description of) nature in the midst of one of his aimless, stoned globetrotting journeys.

Dyer’s authorial persona is of a slacker, a stoner, a failure, but that’s in comedic tension with his prolificacy, which belies that, and this Oxford man leaves evidence, in stray lines, of his own spiritual, literary, and historical knowledge. Yet much of comedy derives from our enjoying another's suffering, and he's a master at portraying his wrecked inner states—often over breakups with girlfriends—in a way that's funny rather than pathetic. He's obviously structured his life to travel and read and write, and implicitly one sees the downside of his unmoored life even as you thrill to his freedom and insouciance.

What a master of the personal essay. Maybe this should get five stars; I'm trying to give four to excellent books, saving five for obvious immortal classics, but it's a personal five-star for me.
ᴜɴɪᴄᴏʀɴ
Dyer is hilarious and insightful, poignant and intelligent. These essays are some of his best--writing wherein the analysis of the event becomes the self-analysis of the writer himself. Perhaps this is most excellently done when Dyer goes to Detroit to write about the modern broken-down ruins littering the city and ends up having a breakdown of his own.
Very good. Very funny. Be prepared to laugh out loud. Dyer is my new hero.

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