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by May Sinclair

  • ISBN: 1419185292
  • Author: May Sinclair
  • ePub ver: 1358 kb
  • Fb2 ver: 1358 kb
  • Rating: 4.2 of 5
  • Language: English
  • Pages: 368
  • Publisher: Kessinger Publishing, LLC (June 17, 2004)
  • Formats: doc lit rtf doc
  • Category: Fiction
  • Subcategory: Contemporary
epub The Three Sisters download

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May SINCLAIR (1863 - 1946)

May SINCLAIR (1863 - 1946). Fascinated as she was by the lives of the Brontë siblings, May Sinclair loosely based her subtly sensual, quietly insurrectionary 1914 novel The Three Sisters on the Haworth moor milieu of the three literary Brontë sisters. Alice, Gwenda, and Mary Cartaret are the daughters of the Vicar of Garth, an abusive father with rigid, selfish expectations for female behavior.

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LibriVox recording of The Three Sisters by May Sinclair. Read in English by Expatriate Fascinated as she was by the lives of the Brontë siblings, May Sinclair loosely based her subtly sensual, quietly insurrectionary 1914 novel The Three Sisters on the Haworth moor milieu of the three literary Brontë sisters. Hope of rescue seems to dawn in the person of an idealistic young doctor in the village, but this is no Austen romance.

May Sinclair was the pseudonym of Mary Amelia St. Clair (24 August 1863 – 14 November 1946), a popular British writer who wrote about two dozen novels, short stories and poetry. She was an active suffragist, and member of the Woman Writers' Suffrage League

May Sinclair was the pseudonym of Mary Amelia St. She was an active suffragist, and member of the Woman Writers' Suffrage League.

Fascinated as she was by the lives of the Brontë siblings, May Sinclair loosely based her subtly sensual, quietly insurrectionary 1914 novel The Three Sisters on the Haworth moor milieu of the three literary Brontë sisters.

You can read The Three Sisters by Sinclair May in our library for absolutely free. Read various fiction books with us in our e-reader.

The Three Sisters book. These three sisters were named Mary, Gwenda and Alice, they lived in the early twentieth century, but the parallels that May Sinclair draws make it obvious that their lives were not so very different to the lives of the Bronte sisters nearly a century earlier. At first I thought that it would be a simple story.

The three sisters I. North of east, in the bottom, where the road drops from the High Moor, is the village of Garth in Garthdale. It crouches there with a crook of the dale behind and before it, between half-shut doors of the west and south

The three sisters I. It crouches there with a crook of the dale behind and before it, between half-shut doors of the west and south. Under the mystery and terror of its solitude it crouches, like a beaten thing, cowering from its topmost roof to the bowed back of its stone bridge.

This scarce antiquarian book is a facsimile reprint of the original. Due to its age, it may contain imperfections such as marks, notations, marginalia and flawed pages. Because we believe this work is culturally important, we have made it available as part of our commitment for protecting, preserving, and promoting the world's literature in affordable, high quality, modern editions that are true to the original work.
Comments (7)

the monster
Good psychological study , but points off for pages and pages of Yorkshire dialect!
Mr.Twister
The written language and prose were very good but the story line was one of the worst, most depressing I have ever endured. I kept thinking it would get better and there could be a little just happiness and finally the book ended with the cold feeling that there was no redeeming value in the story.
ℓo√ﻉ
Can't believe I never heard of this author!!! She ranks right up there with the Bronte sisters et al. I love stories from this period, a classic that I hadn't read before and thoroughly enjoyed!
DART-SKRIMER
Was a great book. I loved it and it was free so it can't get any better than that right?
Auridora
Verified Purchase(What is this?)

This review is from: The Three Sisters (Virago Modern Classic) (Paperback)

Absolutely riveting novel, following Mary, Gwendolen and Alice Cartaret, daughters of an embittered and unlovely vicar. Brought by their father to a remote Yorkshire village after Alice started an embarrassing romance in their previous parish, life seems bleak and dull. Good, sensible Mary is her father's mainstay, while Gwenda is a free spirit, given to lonely hikes over her beloved moors. Alice, meanwhile, is a rather hysterical type, determined to make herself ill so that eligible young Dr Rowcliffe has to be called in to attend her. But the ramifications of their lives and loves have very unexpected outcomes...

Sinclair's writing put me just a touch in mind of Mary Webb. Although relationships - familial and romantic - are the basis of the story, this is by no means a happy tale but one that is shot through with suffering and unfairness.

While the picture on the cover of the Virago edition is of the Bronte sisters, and although the girls' looks and - somewhat - their personalities are similar to the Brontes, this is emphatically not a biography of them but a total work of fiction. The characters' lives and relationships have nothing in common with life in Haworth.

I got totally caught up in this story and couldn't put it down,
Iell
I didn't buy or read "The Three Sisters." Therefore, I can not review "The Three Sisters." Thank you Debra A Pettit
Yggdi
I read about this book and this author in the Bronte Myth by Lucasta Miller, and I decided it might be something I would like. I enjoy reading books about the Brontes and also spin-off novels about their lives. Miller refers to May Sinclair a few times as a woman who appreciated the Brontes and mentioned, The Three Sisters as a novel where Sinclair takes the basic story of three sisters living on the Yorkshire Moors with their recluse father and makes it her own. This book follows these sisters through a period of their lives and Sinclair shows us their interactions with each other, and the small community that they live in, and focuses alot on their relationship with their father who was very domineering and controlling. At times the writing felt a bit disjointed and I had a hard time figuring out exactly what time period it took place in, but these were the only minor problems I had with the book. I would recommend this novel to others and I'm going to be reading more novels by Sinclair in the future.
I loved this book. It is the first work I have read by May Sinclair (1863-1946). I feel like a world has opened to me in discovering an author that creates such complicated female characters, evokes such compelling natural landscapes, and writes so well.

The Virago edition of the book I have features Branwell Bronte's famous painting of Anne, Emily, and Charlotte Bronte on its cover. Because of that image, it's hard not to make comparisons between this story and the real-life story of the Bronte daughters and their authoritative father. However, the actual story is quite different from the Bronte's sad tale of devastating illness and premature death. The daughters in this novel are, happily, not brought down by terrible sickness (though they sometimes get sick), but tenacious of life. The father in the story is admittedly formidable, but the sisters are, in their more quiet ways, stronger than he is.

The central female character of the novel, Gwenda (Gwendolen) Cartaret, is the middle of the three daughters living with their father in a small Yorkshire village. The time period is probably the early 20th century, but this is left vague. Gwenda emerges as a wonderful person--observant, passionate about nature, physically hardy, receptive to those who respect her, but also accepting of those she does not love. The central female-male relationship in the book--Gwenda's with Steven Rowcliffe's, the local doctor--is beautifully and realistically drawn. So is Gwenda's relationship with her two sisters, Mary and Alice. Alice, the youngest sister, sensitive like Gwenda, but more limited and less self-governed, makes choices that distance some of her family members, and bring others (like Gwenda) closer. Mary, the eldest sister, is composed and difficult to know. She takes on a greater role as the novel progresses. And Steven Rowcliffe, the doctor, is complex and appealing.

It's hard not to make excited comparisons to other novels of the 19th and early 20th centuries when reading this book. I was reminded of books by Louisa May Alcott (Gwenda is similar to Jo March--eager and sensitive, brusque at times, not seeing herself as "womanly"); and George Eliot (Steven Rowcliffe is similar to Lydgate in Middlemarch--talented at medicine, vigorous but also ambivalent, wanting something more).

Since these other authors were writing before The Three Sisters was published (1914), it seems like May Sinclair must've been reading widely and receptive to all these influences on her storytelling. But the style of Sinclair's writing (a little bit Woolfian, but with shorter sentences and chapters), and the events in her stories, are unique and unpredictable, romantic yet edgily modern, and all her own.

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