» » Tarzan and the Lion Man

epub Tarzan and the Lion Man download

by Edgar Rice Burroughs,Robert Abbett

  • ISBN: 0345219112
  • Author: Edgar Rice Burroughs,Robert Abbett
  • ePub ver: 1551 kb
  • Fb2 ver: 1551 kb
  • Rating: 4.4 of 5
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Ballantine; 3rd printing edition (1974)
  • Formats: lit lrf txt lrf
  • Category: Fiction
  • Subcategory: Action & Adventure
epub Tarzan and the Lion Man download

Edgar Rice Burroughs (September 1, 1875 – March 19, 1950) was an American fiction writer best known for his celebrated and prolific output in the adventure and science-fiction genres.

Edgar Rice Burroughs (September 1, 1875 – March 19, 1950) was an American fiction writer best known for his celebrated and prolific output in the adventure and science-fiction genres. Among the most notable of his creations are the jungle hero Tarzan, the heroic Mars adventurer John Carter, and the fictional landmass within Earth known as Pellucidar. Burroughs' California ranch is now the center of the Tarzana neighborhood in Los Angeles.

Tarzan and the Lion Man Book Series 1. Tarzan and the Golden Lion. Edgar Rice Burroughs. Tarzan journeys to Sumatra to help same a Dutch girl and her companions from the clutches of some mad-men.

Tarzan and the Lion Man Book Series 17. Tarzan and the City of Gold (Tarzan Series Edgar Rice Burroughs. Tarzan assembles a group of Americans, Dutch, Chinese, and others in a "foreign Legion" fighting force. Exciting tale by the master.

Edgar Rice Burroughs. Magnifique!" ejaculated the Countess de Coude, beneath her breath. The Beasts of Tarzan is a novel by American writer Edgar Rice Burroughs, the third in his series of books about the title character Tarzan. Eh?" questioned the count, turning toward his young wife. Chapter One. In Conference. I did," said the first man out of the corner of his mouth. Again the door opened, and the secretary ushered in a stocky, bronzed man who was greeted familiarly by all in the room

Edgar Rice Burroughs. Mr. Milton Smith, Executive Vice President in Charge of Production, was in conference. A half dozen men lounged comfortably in deep, soft chairs and divans about his large, well-appointed office in the . Smith had a chair behind a big desk, but he seldom occupied it. He was an imaginative, dramatic, dynamic person. Again the door opened, and the secretary ushered in a stocky, bronzed man who was greeted familiarly by all in the room. Smith advanced and shook hands with him. "Glad to see you, Tom," he said.

The Lion Man, Stanley Obroski, is a physically imposing man but ultimately a coward. However few could remain brave in the face of the horrors he faces (except men from fictional stories in the decades old adventure stories). This is the second Tarzan lookalike, the first being Esteban Miranda from Tarzan and the Golden Lion. About halfway through the book the story makes an abrupt change when the woman are captured by Apes capable of talking English.

I obtained genes from living subjects-young men and women whom I enticed to my laboratory on various pretexts. I drugged them and extracted germ cells from them. I had not discovered at that time, or, I should say, I had not perfected the technique of recovering body cells.

It had struggled across the veldt and through the jungle now it was halted, almost destroyed by the poisoned arrows of the savage Bansuto tribe, ahead of them many perils and behind them came Tarzan and t. Sci-fi & Fantasy Thriller & Crime. One fee. Stacks of books.

Burroughs Edgar Rice. A raking talon caught Tarzan on the side, inflicting a long, deep wound and then the ape-man was on Numa's back and the blade was sinking again and again into the savage side

Burroughs Edgar Rice. Tarzan the Terrible By Edgar Rice Burroughs 1 – The Pithecanthropus Silent as the shadows through which he moved, the great beast slunk through the midnight jungle, his yellow-green eyes round and staring, his sinewy tail undulating behind him, his head lowered and flattened, and every muscle vibrant to the thrill of the hunt. A raking talon caught Tarzan on the side, inflicting a long, deep wound and then the ape-man was on Numa's back and the blade was sinking again and again into the savage side. Nor was the man-thing either longer fleeing, or idle.

Tarzan and the Lion Man, Ballantine 1970. Abbett illustrated books for Edgar Rice Burroughs. Tarzan and the Leopard Men, Ballantine 1970. Tarzan's Quest, Ballantine 1974. Tarzan and the Foreign Legion, Ballantine, 1964. Burroughs wrote a novel called The Oakdale Affair. Dr. Michael S. Smith.

by Edgar Rice Burroughs Books related to Tarzan and the Lion Man. Skip this list.

by Edgar Rice Burroughs. Behind them came Tarzan of the Apes with the Golden Lion, seeking the man who might have been his twin brother in looks - though hardly in courage! In this series. Books related to Tarzan and the Lion Man.

A great safari had come to Africa to make a movie. It is now halted, almost destroyed by poison from the savage Bansuto tribe.
Comments (5)

sobolica
This book has enough plot for five or six adventure stories. It has two sets of doubles, a hidden valley full of diamonds, a treasure map, a mad scientist and Tarzan's trip to Hollywood. Also apes with genetic material from Henry VIII. A lot of fun from beginning to end.
Olma
The proofreading or editing in this e-book edition was fairly poor. There were numerous typos and one or two places that sentence structure had completely fallen apart. I can overlook some of these things but they are distracting,
Ffan
I wouldn't go so far as to say this was a bad Tarzan book. I liked that instead of the Jungle Lord encountering yet another lost civilization in the unexplored regions of Africa, here it's a strange realm of pseudo scientific monsters - albeit with a Tudor overlay. And yet Burroughs has to include still another exact duplicate for Tarzan among the cast of characters. Is that the second or third time ERB has resorted to that ridiculous plot device? Apparently someone - Tarzan's father or perhaps his cowardly cousin from very early in the series - had been spreading those Greystoke genes with abandon a few decades back. Anyway, accept this story's faults and just enjoy another adventure with one of popular fiction's most iconic characters. The story lines in the Tarzan series do not always succeed but the man himself - at least as written by Edgar Rice Burroughs - is invariably a fascinating and compelling figure unlike any other.
Nto
A movie producer decides to film a movie in Africa about a fictional "Lion Man" who lives in the jungle; an obvious reference to Tarzan the Ape Man. The entire endeavor is an utter disaster as most of the film crew is killed, the guides all leave, the women are taken hostage and the lead actor playing the Lion Man flees into the jungle. The Lion Man, Stanley Obroski, is a physically imposing man but ultimately a coward. However few could remain brave in the face of the horrors he faces (except men from fictional stories in the decades old adventure stories).

This is the second Tarzan lookalike, the first being Esteban Miranda from Tarzan and the Golden Lion. Miranda bore such a close resemblance Lord Greystoke that even Jane Porter couldn't distinguish the two which seemed highly unlikely. In the case of Obroski, Tarzan is struck by their incredible similarity both facially and physically. I can only imagine that Obroski was supposed to be a surrogate for Johnny Weissmüller who started playing the Ape Man a year prior. Weissmüller was an Olympic champion swimmer while Obroski is written as a champion marathon runner who was to play a Lion Man. Although Obroski was written as being as cowardly as Tarzan is brave when push comes to shove he fights back ferociously. You might think that two Tarzan lookalikes would be an impossible coincidence but that didn't stop Burroughs from introducing a third in Tarzan and the Madman.

About halfway through the book the story makes an abrupt change when the woman are captured by Apes capable of talking English. Suddenly the story is a about a mad scientist doing genetic engineering on apes. Stanley Obroski disappears from the story and it becomes obvious that he only existed so the Tarzan could pass himself off to the coworkers of Obroski who would then be shocked at his transformation into a brave warrior. Tarzan does it as a joke but it doesn’t really make sense since he continues the joke even as events become deadly serious. It was pretty obvious why Burroughs was continuing to have Tarzan portray himself as Stanley even if it made no sense in the story.

Near the end, the book reaches it's punchline as Tarzan ends up essentially playing himself in the film they were creating. In a cruel twist of fate Obroski unceremoniously dies off page from previous injurious even as Tarzan enjoys the spoils of Hollywood. There is a strange tacked on final chapter with Tarzan in Hollywood presenting himself as John Clayton. Balza, a wild woman from earlier in the book is now a movie star and an attempt is made to cast "John Clayton" in a Tarzan movie where he would play himself. The producers are unaware that he literally IS Tarzan. Instead he is given a lesser role. The entire chapter is intended as a joke but it's all in good fun.

Tarzan and the Lion Man starts off well but as often happens Burroughs starts moving the plot all over the place with genetically modified gorilla's, a mad scientist and even a savage tribe of naked whites. Oh, and they found a mountain of diamonds. Tarzan continuing his "joke" was a terrible act of cruelty for the sake of the plot.
Gavinranara
Tarzan is formula fiction, in very nice form but still formula fiction. OK, it's well done formula fiction. Basically a massive safari enters the forest, and the Bansuto [apparently no relation to the Bantu] use poisoned arrows to raise havoc. There is conflict, some major challenged which almost take our hero to the brink, but everything is resolved at the end. You would think Burroughs had read The Writers Journey: Mythic Structure for Writers, 3rd Edition or The Key: How to Write Damn Good Fiction Using the Power of Myth, but didn't quite free it up enough. Much as I do love Tarzan novels, and many do, him flying in WW II was sort of riding the shark. They come of another time, a simpler time, of nobility, of moral choices, and also of inferiors. They are as much a commentary on their times, as fiction. Still a fun read, for me. I used to check out a lot of books, for a weekend, as a kid, and read them all. This was in that class, and I do still occasionally do that. This is a good choice.

Related to Tarzan and the Lion Man: