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by Louise Welsh

  • ISBN: 1934609706
  • Author: Louise Welsh
  • ePub ver: 1850 kb
  • Fb2 ver: 1850 kb
  • Rating: 4.9 of 5
  • Language: English
  • Pages: 384
  • Publisher: Felony & Mayhem (May 16, 2011)
  • Formats: mbr azw mobi txt
  • Category: Fiction
  • Subcategory: Action & Adventure
epub Naming the Bones download

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Naming the Bones has been added to your Cart. His body never recovered from the sea where he drowned. Against a background of academic bitchery, sexual trysts and an unravelling family life, Dr Watson's love for the one slim volume of the poet's work is the only pure thing in his anaemic life. Consumed with self-doubt as he runs up against a series of dead ends, Dr Watson asks himself if his quest is pointless.

In Naming the Bones, Louise Welsh follows the classic style with her protagonist Murray Mystery novels . You will be! Just my opinion obviously. This is the 2nd Louise Welsh book I have read, they sound so good on the back but for me the books are nothing like the promise to come.

In Naming the Bones, Louise Welsh follows the classic style with her protagonist Murray Mystery novels and their readers have funny relationships, more than other genres such readers look for reflections of self in the protagonists; I doubt many self proclaimed "dog people" read books with talking cat "detectives," for instance. I won't be reading any more from this author.

Authors - Fiction, Authors, Lismore Island (Scotland) - Fiction, Scotland - Lismore Island. Edinburgh : Canongate. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books. Uploaded by station09. cebu on January 3, 2020. SIMILAR ITEMS (based on metadata). Terms of Service (last updated 12/31/2014).

He saw the landlady’s eyes on it as she placed his cooked breakfast on the table. Murray set the book aside, making a conscious effort not to rub his hands together with the joy of fried bacon, eggs. and sausage materialising before him with no effort from himself. Mrs Dunn acknowledged his thanks with a nod. She went back into the kitchen, stepping neatly round a cat that had stationed itself in front of the electric heater glowing from the centre of the room, and returned with a pot of coffee and a round of toast

Louise Welsh (born 1 February 1965 in London) is an English-born author of short stories and psychological thrillers, resident in. .Her fourth novel, Naming the Bones, was published by Canongate Books in March 2010.

Louise Welsh (born 1 February 1965 in London) is an English-born author of short stories and psychological thrillers, resident in Glasgow, Scotland Contents. Her fifth novel, The Girl on the Stairs is a psychological thriller set in Berlin and published in August 2012 by Hodder & Stoughton

Louise Welsh's superb "Naming the Bones" is a book it is as hard to categorise as it is easy to appreciate . This is Louise Welsh's fourth novel and it is easy to see why she is building such a reputation as an author who brings a high degree of literary skill to her subjects.

Louise Welsh's superb "Naming the Bones" is a book it is as hard to categorise as it is easy to appreciate and enjoy. In this case the book's central character is Dr Murray Watson, an academic in the English Literature Department of Glasgow University.

Louise Welsh is the bestselling author of many novels, including The Cutting Room, Tamburlaine Must Die and The Bullet Trick

so much more than another literary mystery  . Louise Welsh is the bestselling author of many novels, including The Cutting Room, Tamburlaine Must Die and The Bullet Trick. She was chosen as one of Britain's Best First Novelists of 2002 by the Guardian.

Naming the Bones (Paperback). Louise Welsh (author) . so much more than another literary mystery Spellbinding! Grazia Welsh creates a vivid sense of place. She paces revelations with care and keeps you hooked till the end.

Professor Murray Watson is rather a sad sack. His family, his career, his affair...not even drinking offers much joy. All his energies are now focused on his research into Archie Lunan, a minor poet who drowned 30 years ago off a remote stretch of Scottish coast. By redeeming Lunan's reputation, Watson hopes to redeem his own. But the more he learns about Lunan's sordid life, the more unlikely redemption appears.
Comments (5)

MrRipper
In this atmospheric and leisurely Scottish mystery, youngish Murray Watson, Glasgow doctor of English literature, has taken a sabbatical to research his literary inspiration, the dead poet Archie Lunan. Drowned sailing in a storm off a remote island in the 1970s, Lunan, 25, left only one slim volume of poems.

There are those - including Watson's department head, Fergus Baine, who think one volume was quite enough. Baine was against the project from the beginning and after a discouraging slog through the minimal record, Watson is beginning to wonder if Baine wasn't right after all.

But then Watson is having an affair with Baine's wife, which might also explain his boss' general enmity. Interviewing every tenuous lead, from old drinking buddies in gritty pubs to Lunan's mentor, a secretive retired professor with a deep dislike of Fergus Baine, to an attractive young widow whose husband had an unhealthy interest in art and suicide, Watson decides to go to Lismore, where Lunan died and his lover, Christie, still lives.

Christie has refused to have anything to do with Watson's project. She has even promised to have him prosecuted as a stalker if she catches sight of him. So Watson, while determined, is circumspect, probing the clannish islanders for information about the pair's history while ducking out of sight every time he sees Christie.

Dr. Watson, like his namesake, is charmingly clueless. And for all that his personal life is a shambles, and his professional life is teetering, he still manages to be engaging rather than pathetic. The island - complete with a deserted limekiln village - is everything you could ask for: bleak, secretive, wet, rocky, muddy and romantic. And the central conundrum: why can't an artist's work stand on its own, without personal context muddying perceptions, is playful rather than pedantic.

Welsh (The Cutting Room) delivers a literate novel full of prickly, demanding characters (except for hapless Watson who is more battered than battering, though he does try) with a wonderfully over-the-top macabre ending. Highly recommended for those who like their mysteries edgy, literate and not too bloody.
Barit
I enjoyed the Bullet Trick and Cutting Room both by the same author so I am totally hooked on anything that louise Welsh writes. Naming the Bones was another thriller with just the right amount of mystery, sex, local color, with a cast of characters who were all somewhat bizarre and unique. I was not expecting the surprise ending and was not disappointed in the manner in which the story came together and ended. I hope that there is not such a long passage of time until the next book is published. They only get better and Naming the Bones, in my opinion, is probably the best of the three. I hope that others enjoy the book as much as I have.
krot
The night was dark and stormy . . . Dr Murray Watson is knee-deep in mud, shivering with terror and cold. "He grunted and pulled, feeling all the while that the struggle was two-sided and whatever lay below wanted to drag him down there with it."
Louise Welsh has written a purler about an English lit academic who takes a sabbatical to research the life of drink-addled Archie Lunan, a young Scottish poet dead these past 30 years in tragic circumstances. His body never recovered from the sea where he drowned.
Against a background of academic bitchery, sexual trysts and an unravelling family life, Dr Watson's love for the one slim volume of the poet's work is the only pure thing in his anaemic life. Consumed with self-doubt as he runs up against a series of dead ends, Dr Watson asks himself if his quest is pointless. A central theme to this whodunit is whether a writer's life is of any consequence or whether "the life is an unfortunate distraction from the art".
In a bitter moment Dr Watson wonders if they should delete authors' names from all books and let the works stand or fall on their merit.
Finding Louise Welsh reminds me of the excitement I felt on first reading Ruth Rendell or P.D. James for here is an assured storyteller shot through with daring and originality.
I will now seek out her three previous novels including the much-admired The Cutting Room.
Highly recommended.

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