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by Daniel F. Galouye

  • ISBN: 060039025X
  • Author: Daniel F. Galouye
  • ePub ver: 1713 kb
  • Fb2 ver: 1713 kb
  • Rating: 4.8 of 5
  • Language: English
  • Pages: 192
  • Publisher: Littlehampton Book Services Ltd; New edition edition (November 11, 1982)
  • Formats: lit mobi mbr docx
  • Category: Fantasy
  • Subcategory: Science Fiction
epub Dark Universe download

Dark Universe by Daniel F. Galouye CHAPTER ONE CHAPTER TWO CHAPTER THREE CHAPTER FOUR CHAPTER FIVE CHAPTER SIX CHAPTER SEVEN CHAPTER EIGHT CHAPTER NINE CHAPTER TEN CHAPTER ELEVEN CHAPTER TWELVE CHAPTER.

Dark Universe by Daniel F. Galouye CHAPTER ONE CHAPTER TWO CHAPTER THREE CHAPTER FOUR CHAPTER FIVE CHAPTER SIX CHAPTER SEVEN CHAPTER EIGHT CHAPTER NINE CHAPTER TEN CHAPTER ELEVEN CHAPTER TWELVE CHAPTER THIRTEEN CHAPTER FOURTEEN CHAPTER FIFTEEN CHAPTER SIXTEEN CHAPTER SEVENTEEN ABOUT THE AUTHOR. Dark Universe by Daniel F. Galouye. CHAPTER ONE. Pausing beside the hanging needle of rock, Jared tapped it with his lance.

FREE shipping on qualifying offers. Nominated for the Hugo Award The classic tale of a post-apocalyptic world where humans have built a society in the dark underground. The descendents of the survivors only remember the pre-apocalyptic world in old stories. The survivors live underground, as far from the Original World as possible and protected from the ultimate evil.

Dark Universe by Daniel F. Galouye CHAPTER ONE Pausing beside the hanging needle of rock, Jared tapped it with his lance. Читать онлайн Dark Universe. Precise, staccatolike tones filled the passageway. I don’t hear a thing. Owen edged forward, stumbled and fell lightly against Jared’s back. Nothing but mud and hanging stones. No pits? None that I can hear. by Daniel F.

It's tricky to do a whole lot of world-building in just 154 pages, even if that world, as in Daniel F. Galouye's Dark Universe, is small and confined by nature. The trick is to be telegraphic, to let every line convey something about the plot, characters and setting all at once - or to just let the world building take care of itself, let the reader's imagination do that work. I realized, as I read through this, that I prefer the latter.

Dark Universe is a post-apocalyptic science fiction novel by Daniel F. Galouye, first published in 1961. The book was nominated for a Hugo award in 1962. The Survivors live deep underground in a world of complete darkness, divided into two clans, one living in the Lower Level and one in the Upper Level.

Publisher: Bantam Books, 1961. The survivors live underground, as far from the Original World as possible and protected from the ultimate evil, Radiation.

Author: Daniel Galouye. Publisher: Bantam Books, 1961. Then terrible monsters, who bring with them a screaming silence, are seen and people start to disappear.

Download books for free. Daniel F. Galouye - Dark Universe.

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Comments (7)

Rainshaper
The concept was very interesting, but after about 50 or so pages, I found the world was very gimicky and the characters were boring. The plot itself didn't really interest me, either. I found myself skimming pages just to get to the end.
Angana
Galouye's world is quite disturbing -- mankind first retreated after a nuclear fallout to what is called the Original World, an underground upper level which possessed artificial light sources. Then after a period of time, humanity descended deeper underground altogether losing the ability to create light. Instead, the people developed various skills (aided, perhaps implausibly by mutations from radiation) including the heightened ability to hear -- the sound waves produced by clicking stones enable Jared and his people navigate the cave passages. The society they have formed deep underground away from the light clusters around hot springs that are mysteriously going dry.

Jared Fenton has nagging questions about the concepts of Light and Darkness which have become enshrouded with religions connotations (and misconceptions). His journey for answers is delayed by his society's desire for him to marry -- until a series of events occur which lead him into contact with the Zivvers. The Zivvers are also humans who have heightened sense of vision in that they are able to see the infra-red spectrum (and thus, poor hearing and olfactory senses). They are ostracized from the other humans who believe them to be tainted. With the aid of Della, he uncovers the mysteries of his world.

Daniel F. Galouye had previously published rather run of the mill pulp action sci-fi until this novel -- his very first. He was correctly rewarded with a Hugo nomination. Although lacking in characterization, his novel rests on the ingenuity of his world -- and more aptly, on the skill which Galouye formulates the society which has developed underground. Galouye creates mannerisms and phrases (all seeing metaphors and expressions have been altered to reflect the COMPLETE absence of light), the culture (the Ten Touches of Familiarization which allows newly met individuals to briefly touch another to ascertain their physical form and features), the religion, the way of life....

The downside of the novel is its rather predictable plot (still quite unusual), thin characterization, and the rambling nature of the narrative in the last third (running from various peoples, hiding here, running some more, accidentally discovering this or that, and hiding there). However, the high concepts of his world and the reintroduction of light is absolutely fascinating and transfixing.

Daniel F. Galouye's work has often been described as a lost classic and I certainly agree. His world building skills are top notch. Along with Walter Miller, Jr's masterful Canticle for Leibowitz, Dark Universe ranks among the best post-apocalyptic books from the late 50s and early 60s.

A truly rewarding sci-fi take on Plato's cave...

Find a copy -- sadly, they tend to quite scarce/expensive...
Centrizius
After nearly a decade writing action-oriented stories for a variety of pulp science fiction magazines, in 1961 Daniel Galouye published Dark Universe, the first and best of his six novels. For his remarkable effort, he was rewarded with a Hugo nomination for best novel, losing by a slim margin to Heinlein's Stranger In A Strange Land.
The glory of Dark Universe is not simply Galouye's creation of an alien world, but his success in describing an alien way of *perceiving* that world. The characters of the novel are humans who live underground in total darkness and have finely tuned their other senses -- particularly their hearing -- to compensate for the lack of sight, as a blind person might. That whole communities exist in this state and navigate their world accordingly hightens the novel's sensory effect, challenging the reader to perceive as the characters do. Initial disorientation leads slowly to an understanding of the internal "language" these characters use to interact with each other and their environment, an achievement similar to Burgess's in A Clockwork Orange, where the narrarator's slang-dominated prose gradually begins to make sense by way of context. As a display of technique that engages the reader and demands thoughtful attention, Dark Universe is a masterpiece.
Perhaps predictably, Galouye's history in the pulps results in a run-of-the-mill plot with thin characterizations -- lots of SF writers admittedly have these problems -- but despite these flaws, and an abrupt and somewhat unsatisfying ending, Dark Universe is still an impressive book. It's also a quick read, considerably shorter -- and arguably more enjoyable -- than Heinlein's more famous work of that same year. Galouye's other books are also worth searching for, especially Simulacron-3 (1964), an early exploration of what would eventually come to be known as "virtual reality."
mIni-Like
There are a few classic SF novels for claustrophiliacs, Silverberg's "The world inside" or Brian Aldiss' "Non-stop", but I must say this tops them all. Imagine you were born in a pitch dark cave, mutated to ping your way either with sonar or infrared. This is Daniel Galouye's post nuclear dystopia and it is wonderfully described.

The novel, despite being fifty years old, feels like it was written this morning and the see-less (but not eyeless) societies are portrayed with excellent insight. Actually, it almost feels like Daniel Galouye put on his anthropologist's hat and spent time with these people, recording their ways and customs.

This would be 5 stars, but for the main protagonist who starts well, but at the end of the book fails somehow to react as his former character would imply. I must also add that (one of the very few times I can say this) Dark Universe could be a much longer novel about 3 or 4 times its present size and still be a fascinating read.

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