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by Poul Anderson

  • ISBN: 0812545982
  • Author: Poul Anderson
  • ePub ver: 1651 kb
  • Fb2 ver: 1651 kb
  • Rating: 4.1 of 5
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Tor Science Fiction (February 15, 1998)
  • Formats: lrf lrf azw doc
  • Category: Fantasy
  • Subcategory: Science Fiction
epub The Fleet of Stars download

Anderson has produced more milestones in contemporary science fiction and fantasy than any one man is entitled to. ―Stephen Donaldson.

Anderson has produced more milestones in contemporary science fiction and fantasy than any one man is entitled to. Poul Anderson has poured over fifty years of skill and talent into a grandmaster-class story.

More by Poul Anderson.

Poul Anderson (1926–2001) grew up bilingual in a Danish American family. After discovering science fiction fandom and earning a physics degree at the University of Minnesota, he found writing science fiction more satisfactory. Admired for his hard science fiction, mysteries, historical novels, and fantasy with rivets, he also excelled in humor. He was the guest of honor at the 1959 World Science Fiction Convention and at many similar events, including the 1998 Contact Japan 3 and the 1999 Strannik Conference in Saint Petersburg, Russia

Suspecting a conspiracy to suppress humankind's freedom, Guthrie begins a dangerous journey across the realm of comets.

Every one of them is a "5". This one is simply a failure.

While the middle volumes had been set in the solar system and dealt entirely with the struggle against domineering AI, here Anderson brings back the interstellar colonization theme. The freewheeling humans that made it to Alpha Centauri in the opening book have, in the subsequent centuries, expanded further to other star systems in the nearest few light years. I have ten other books by Poul Anderson. Every one of them is a "5". It dragggggggs terribly. This is the first book by Anderson that I know of that is badly written.

Sci-fi & Fantasy Military Sci-fi. One fee. Stacks of books. Read whenever, wherever. Your phone is always with you, so your books are too – even when you’re offline.

Homeward and Beyond (1975). The Best of Poul Anderson (1976). The Night Face & Other Stories (1979).

Scanned on April 03, 2002 by Warburner. 1. IN THE ANCIENT faith of her people, Amaterasu was the Sun Goddess, from whom flowed the light that gives life. The discoverers of a world far and strange named it for her because they hoped that someday their kind would make it blossom. The explorers that first went there were not human. Nor were the pioneers that followed, but they wrought mightily, until at last this Amaterasu could begin to nurture a people.

In Fleet of Stars, Poul Anderson brings back the wildly colorful Anson Guthrie, his iconoclastic hero from Harvest of Stars. The staid, somber people of Earth are not only dependent on technology, they are all but ruled by machine intelligence. Suspecting a conspiracy to suppress humankind's last vestiges of freedom, Guthrie begins a dangerous journey across the realm of the comets, the asteroids, and the stars themselves--willing to risk his life to preserve humanity's ability to roam the universe.

Comments (7)

Llathidan
In 1993, science-fiction author Poul Anderson published Harvest of Stars, the first in a four-volume future history that depicted the human race grappling with machine intelligences. That first volume was mainly a libertarian fantasy about independent spacers evading a tyrannical world government, but it ended with a colony to Alpha Centauri launched just as true AI was appearing on Earth.

For Anderson, superhuman intelligences were scary because they might lead to a managed economy, the great bugbear of libertarians like himself. But also, Anderson started off writing science-fiction in the 1950s when everyone envisaged intrepid space cowboys flying their ships all over the galaxy. By his old age, it was becoming evident that automation meant humans would have little direct role in piloting craft or working any other machines. Furthermore, other forward-thinking authors like Vernor Vinge were suggesting that humanity might even choose to simply stay put and move into a virtual reality instead of expanding outward into the galaxy. This reversal of all he had held dear left Anderson appalled.

The FLEET OF STARS is the fourth and final volume of this series. While the middle volumes had been set in the solar system and dealt entirely with the struggle against domineering AI, here Anderson brings back the interstellar colonization theme. The freewheeling humans that made it to Alpha Centauri in the opening book have, in the subsequent centuries, expanded further to other star systems in the nearest few light years.

As the novel opens Anson Guthrie, Anderson's libertarian hero that has lived for centuries in these distant colonies as a downloaded personality, gets word that Earth's cybernetic overlords have discovered some shocking secret through their distributed space telescope array. Boarding a c-ship where he can hibernate during the long voyage, Guthrie heads for Earth to see what's up. The bulk of the book consists of a handful of discontented humans on the Moon and Mars complaining about how AI stifles the meaning of their lives and attempting to riddle out the secret discovery about which rumours are flying. Eventually Guthrie arrives, falls in with them, and then there's some action and gunplay.

This is all extremely disappointing science-fiction. Though we are now over a millennium in the future by this fourth book, the culture and technology here is hardly any different than in previous volumes of the series, and indeed the computing interfaces they use were already coming to seem clunky and primitive when Anderson wrote this book in the 1900s. In spite of his reputation as a proponent of "hard science-fiction", Anderson in fact shows very little imagination, especially compared to the cyberpunks who were turning out such fresh work in the same period that he was writing.

In the third volume of the series, HARVEST THE FIRE, it seemed like Anderson's plot was bringing him past mere libertarian ranting, but sadly the reappearance of the Anson Guthrie character allows him to crank it up all over again. Guthrie, the book's second protagonist alongside the restless moondweller Fen, serves only to voice Anderson's dislike of governments, income tax, environmental protection regs, etc. The big reveal of the AI secret that the reader waits for turns out not to be any big reveal at all, and this is not the first time in this series that Anderson keeps us in suspense only to find out there was nothing really there.

Thus, all in all, it feels like Anderson gave up on hard science fiction and just wanted to quickly build a generic and invariable mid-20th-century space opera setting where he could bang on about political themes without the actual march of technology or the fact that human cultures change over time getting in his way. I can't recommend this series, even if the epic scope of the first volume might (in spite of the libertarian agitprop) augur well.
Chillhunter
Much in the same style as a Heinlein book in it's gruff long-lived hero, Anson Guthrie, the story may not please some who want up to the minute hard techno SF or a tight linear plot. The focus on the humanity of the characters, the way they think and feel at first seems distracting but leads you to give real thought to the conflicting philosophies that are presented by the various types of humans and the computer derived "protectors" that they have created somewhat in their image... In between you meet many various characters from different human and evolved animal societies and get involved in what their dreams,wishes, loves, and regrets are... I saw the books questions could be applied to our own here and now and what should be important for humanity to do... Should we be safe and save resources and stay here on our Earth or is there some reason or need to gamble and send man and not just robots to space.. This book explores all that and more without
pushing answers on you..It's also an entertaining big-question, old-style, many ideas at once SF story...not for everyone...but Poul Anderson sure does write characters you would like to know and can feel for... It moved me and made me cry at the end...and whatever a book's faults I guess that's an endorsement of the characterization...
Eyalanev
"Fleet of Stars" is old-style sf dressed-up for the 90's and being walked around. I didn't finish it.
In the story Anderson recycles the classic, hero Anson Guthrie from "Harvest of Stars". "Harvest" was not a bad novel. And I could believe its vision of the future. In "Fleet", hundreds of years have passed. On Earth, an interplanetary sentient computer network exists along side of nano-tech, planetary engineering, and near FTL travel. When two of the characters are given a calculator and told to memorize all the sines from zero to 45 degrees to four decimal places as punishment, I stopped reading. Calculators! Here is an author unclear with the concept. Thinking like that would result in flint chippers being issued as standard equipment with nuclear warheads. That is the problem with "Fleet" everyone thinks and acts like they're in 60's or 70's USA.
Anderson remains technically a good writer, but he is severely dated. Claims to be a "Hard Science Fiction Author" mean he does not write novels with scenes violating the laws of physics. However, societal and technologic change are considerably more volatile then the speed of light. This is a novel by an author who is literally "locked-in" to his formative years. "Fleet" is golden age of sf draped in 90's techie buzzwords. The result is a story not silly enough to be considered a parody.
furious ox
This book has some interesting parts, some good parts and some fun parts. But, the sum of these three does not equal a well written whole. This novel at 405 pages is at least 100 pages TOO long! It has at least two TOO many subplots. If this was the first writing of Poul Anderson that I read I would never want to read anything else of his. A good deal of the book is tedious reading. In contrast to this novel some of his short stories and novellas are very good.
The ending is ho-hum at best.
I finished reading this book largely out of a sense of duty. I don't like to start something and not finish it.
happy light
The fourth volume of the Harvest of Stars Series sees Anson Guthrie, intrepid explorer who has led mankind to the stars and formed the Gaia worlds that ensure his immortality, concerned that the computer intelligence that rules the Earth may have something in mind for those who have left. With the help of Lunarian colonists of Alpha Centauri, Guthrie sends a download in an armed ship to the Solar System. During this time a human living on the Moon goes through a career that leads him to wanted to establish a Gaia in the solar system, on Mars. A very well written tale with Anderson's wonderful style, I was very happy to have picked up this book.

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