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by Edmond Hamilton

  • ISBN: 0345259009
  • Author: Edmond Hamilton
  • ePub ver: 1215 kb
  • Fb2 ver: 1215 kb
  • Rating: 4.1 of 5
  • Language: English
  • Pages: 381
  • Publisher: Ballantine Books; 1st edition (1977)
  • Formats: lrf doc rtf lrf
  • Category: Fantasy
epub The Best of Edmond Hamilton download

Free books to read or listen online in a convenient form, a large collection, the best authors and series. If you enjoy the works of Edmond Hamilton then we highly recommend this publication for your book collection.

Free books to read or listen online in a convenient form, a large collection, the best authors and series. 697. Published: 2009. He was afraid-not of the present or the future, but of the past. He was afraid of the thing tagged Reed Kieran, that stiff blind voiceless thing wheeling its slow orbit around the Moon, companion to dead worlds and silent space.

Any part of this book may be reproduced in any form and by any means without the prior written consent of anyone.

Leopold Classic Library is delighted to publish this classic book as part of our extensive collection. Edmond Hamilton was a 20th century American author whose sci-fi works were featured in various magazines during the mid-1900s. Actions & Adventure.

Finding books BookSee BookSee - Download books for free. Edmond Hamilton - Captain Future 23 - The Harpers of Titan. 59 Kb.

Edmond Moore Hamilton (October 21, 1904 – February 1, 1977) was an American writer of science fiction during the mid-twentieth century. Born in Youngstown, Ohio, he was raised there and in nearby New Castle, Pennsylvania. Something of a child prodigy, he graduated from high school and entered Westminster College in New Wilmington, Pennsylvania at the age of 14, but washed out at 17.

The Edmond Hamilton Mega Science Fiction Collection (Mega Collection Book 4). .

An excellent collection of Edmond Hamilton's stories. This is a very good compilation of Edmund Hamilton's work, spanning his career up to the time the book was compiled by his wife, Leigh Brackett. All true and valid points.

The Best of Leigh Brackett. The Universe Wreckers, The Collected Edmond Hamilton, Volume Three. But, like most writers who made a living from the pulp magazines, Hamilton wrote too much and too fast, and many of his stories suffered from cardboard characters and routine plots. He was one of the pioneers of the "gee whiz" school of SF, which further hurt his reputation when science fiction matured in the 1940s and 50s.

Edmond Hamilton - Edmond Moore Hamilton (October 21, 1904 February 1 1977) was a popular author of science fiction stories and novels during the mid . Masterpieces: The Best Science Fiction of the Century -.

Edmond Hamilton - Edmond Moore Hamilton (October 21, 1904 February 1 1977) was a popular author of science fiction stories and novels during the mid twentieth century.

Edmond Hamilton isn't as well-known as he deserves to be, and that's a shame. From the earliest days of the Golden Age, to the dawn of more complex & literate science fiction, his was always a name & imagination to be reckoned with, a guarantee of good reading. The stories from his first decades are raw & wild, bursting with ideas & spectacular images.

Here is a collection of some of the finest short fiction penned by one of â?†"fathers" of modern science fiction. *** These stories were selected (and edited) by his wife Leigh Brackett, an author and a screenwriter. Her screen-writing credits include works on such films as The Big Sleep, Rio Bravo, The Long Goodbye and Star Wars: The Empire Strikes Back. I*** This collection spans nearly half a century of Edmond Hamilton's work and was selected from a repository of hundreds of stories that he had written over that period.
Comments (7)

Bu
When science fiction magazines first began polling their readers in the early 1930s, Edmond Hamilton was always the fans' favorite author. But, like most writers who made a living from the pulp magazines, Hamilton wrote too much and too fast, and many of his stories suffered from cardboard characters and routine plots. He was one of the pioneers of the "gee whiz" school of SF, which further hurt his reputation when science fiction matured in the 1940s and 50s. Hamilton continued to write SF in later decades--and got better as a writer-- but never reclaimed his early popularity or prestige.

This collection gathers short fiction published by Hamilton between 1926 and 1968; it was edited by Leigh Brackett, who was Hamilton's wife (and, if truth be told, a better prose stylist than Hamilton). Brackett's choices show that Hamilton, from his earliest days, wrote stories with interesting and innovative ideas along with his routine space operas, and that he could write genuinely sensitive and affecting pieces when he had the time and inclination. The collection includes a good introduction by Brackett, a valuable afterword by Hamilton, and bibliographic data on the date and place of publication of each story. It does NOT, unfortunately, have a working table of contents.

The collection starts with Hamilton's first published story, "The Monster-God of Marmuth" (which appeared in Weird Tales in 1926). An effective piece of pulp horror, the story reminds me of early H.P. Lovecraft, although Hamilton says his inspiration was A. Merritt. "The Man Who Evolved" (Wonder Stories, 1931) is another exciting pulp story, albeit based on a ludicrous scientific idea.

Early on, Hamilton occasionally began using his stories to explore fascinating SF ideas. "Fessenden's Worlds" (Weird Tales, 1937) was one of the first stories to wonder if our universe might not be the result of a malignant alien super being's science project gone awry, rather than the work of a benificent Creator. (Clifford Simak had written a story with a similar idea two years earlier, but had trouble finding a publisher for it; this was still a controversial concept in 1937). The novelette "A Conquest of Two Worlds" (Wonder Stories, 1932) is not a terribly well-written piece of prose, but was way ahead of its time in speculating that Earthmen finding inhabited planets might not treat the aliens any better than the European settlers treated the Native Americans. "The Accursed Galaxy" (Astounding Stories, 1935) takes the then newly-discovered concept of an expanding universe and gives it a wonderfully sardonic twist.

By the mid-30s, Hamilton was mixing sensitive, poetic stories in with his space adventures. "He That Hath Wings" (Weird Tales, 1936) is a genuine classic of fantastic fiction; the story of a mutant boy born with wings, it is a powerful commentary on how our society treats anyone "different." "In the World's Dusk" (Weird Tales, 1938) was not the first end-of-the-world story (Wells used the idea at the end of "The Time Machine"), but was a moody and atmospheric treatment of the concept. "The Man Who Returned" (Weird Tales, 1935) is a truly disturbing story, which starts with the the protagonist being buried alive-- and his fate only gets worse and worse from there.

Hamilton's work continued to mature in the 1950s and 60s, but probably nothing that he ever wrote has the power of "What's It Like Out There?" (Thrilling Wonder, 1952). Many SF writers in the 1950s wrote stories about psychologically wounded spacemen (probably reflecting the guilt and torment of servicemen who survived the horrors of World War II), but this is the best of the bunch.

Not every story in this collection has aged as well, but this is a good assortment of works from a science fiction writer who is no longer as well-remembered as he should be. (Another Hamilton collection available for the Kindle, not quite as good as this but nonetheless worthwhile, and with only one story in common with this one, is Monsters of Mars and Other Works by Edmond Hamilton (Unexpurgated Edition) (Halcyon Classics) .
Qusserel
I grabbed a free Edmond Hamilton story ("The Stars, My Brothers") from the Kindle store and it intrigued me, Therefore, when I got an email from Amazon touting this collection (good old Amazon, they've perfected the science of targeted marketing) with a reasonable price, I bought it.
This collection of short stories, chosen by his editor-wife, spans 50 years (!!!), from the 30's to the 80's. One or two of the early stories came off as a little Buck-Rogersish, but that was OK. In his stories, technology is not the main character; rather, personal struggle takes main stage. Several of these stories would have been perfect for the Twilight Zone series of the 60's; I can envision the chain-smoking Rod Serling introducing and summarizing the character and plot lines. Who knows, maybe one or two was adapted for TZ - I haven't checked (anyone out there with some spare time?).
To confess, I am a fan of older science fiction, as I grew up on Ray Bradbury and Isaac Asimov in the 60's, and this did not disappoint.
Dyni
Hamilton mastered the "pulp" thrust of science fiction, and its virtues, almost before that term for the genre was coined. He could put more drama into a short story than many writers at greater length would manage in a full-length novel. And all of these stories, originally published in "Analog" and other SF magazines, retain that punch.

The science is far from perfect, and occasionally diverges from what was known even in the 1930s and 1940s. "Thundering Worlds" is full of passion and plot, but the physics of planetary bodies is inaccurate enough to be distracting to an informed reader ... yet, still, it's one helluva story.

The Del Rey mass-market paperback edition (also available, and different from what's currently pictured) has a striking illustration on its cover of the best story of the lot, "He That Hath Wings." You'll shed a tear for the fate of the protagonist even if you don't envy him his mutation, as I do.
Kulasius
This delightful series of short science fiction stories is great! Every one of the stories is a real gem, and many stick with you a long time after you read them. I highly recommend for writers studying craft!
Vut
Mixed reviews. Some stories were great classic sci-fi. Some tending towards space opera.
Mora
Great book!!
WtePSeLNaGAyko
One of the best of the sci-fi author.His stories always entertained.
Great early SF by one of the early masters.

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