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by Seymour B. Sarason,Patricia A. Wasley,Ann Lieberman,Joseph P. McDonald,Julie Sarason

  • ISBN: 0807735434
  • Author: Seymour B. Sarason,Patricia A. Wasley,Ann Lieberman,Joseph P. McDonald,Julie Sarason
  • ePub ver: 1965 kb
  • Fb2 ver: 1965 kb
  • Rating: 4.4 of 5
  • Language: English
  • Pages: 416
  • Publisher: Teachers College Press (June 15, 1996)
  • Formats: lrf rtf mbr mobi
  • Category: Education
  • Subcategory: Schools & Teaching
epub Revisiting The Culture of the School and the Problem of Change (the series on school reform) download

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Home Browse Books Book details, The Culture of the School and the Problem o. .The Culture of the School and the Problem of Change. By Seymour B. Sarason. In writing a book I have always found it helpful and necessary early in the process to decide what I was not going to include. This was a particularly difficult decision to make with this book, as one might expect when one is writing about schools. Race and Reform: Educational "Niche Picking" in a Hostile Environment By Hubbard, Lea Mehan, Hugh The Journal of Negro Education, Vol. 68, No. 2, Spring 1999.

Seymour Bernard Sarason was Professor of Psychology Emeritus at Yale University, where he taught from 1945 to 1989. The primary focus of his work was on education reform in the United States. In the 1950s he and George Mandler initiated Seymour Bernard Sarason was Professor of Psychology Emeritus at Yale University, where he taught from 1945 to 1989.

Sarason also takes a close look at government involvement in change efforts in schooling-and includes a detailed examination of current efforts to implement PL 94-142 into public schools

Sarason also takes a close look at government involvement in change efforts in schooling-and includes a detailed examination of current efforts to implement PL 94-142 into public schools. He presents compelling evidence that the federal effort to change and improve schools has largely been a failure. Also included are investigations into the purposes of schooling and how these purposes can be affected by change, and the process by which educators and administrators formulate intended outcomes of change efforts. In Part II, Dr. Sarason revisits the text and the issues 25 years after the.

Transforming Schools through Collaborative Leadership. London, The Falmer Press. Mission impossible, A reconsideration of democratic education in schools. Educational Practice and Theory, 22 (1), 39-55. Kiran Temple University Fox School of Business ‘17, Course Hero Intern. I cannot even describe how much Course Hero helped me this summer. It’s truly become something I can always rely on and help me.

Series: the series on school reform. Although the book does not introduce new revelations to the body of knowledge related to school reform and leadership development, it does present the material in a concise and easy to read format. This book is not for deep intellectual pondering, rather it would be a good read for educators at a school who are interested in moving their institution forward. A wonderful dialogue could develop between new and veteran teachers as they discussed their insights from this book and what change might look like for their campus.

The Culture of the school and the problem of change. Alcohol reform during American Prohibition has been studied from status-politics and politico-economic perspectives. This obituary describes the life of Seymour Bernard Sarason, professor emeritus of psychology at Yale University, who died on January 28, 2010, in New Haven, Connecticut, at the age of 91. Seymour was the founder and the conscience of the field of community psychology, a prophetic and guiding light in the study of school culture and reform in education, and a groundbreaking leader in the field of mental retardation.

Personal Name: Sarason, Seymour Bernard, 1919-2010. Physical Description: xv 398 p. : ill. ;, 25 cm. Title: The series on school reform. Bibliography, etc. Note

Personal Name: Sarason, Seymour Bernard, 1919-2010. Varying Form of Title: Culture of the school and the problem of change. Publication, Distribution, et. New York. Teachers College Press, (c)1996. Note: Includes bibliographical references and index. Personal Name: Sarason, Seymour Bernard, 1919-2010.

Revisiting The Culture of the School and the Problem of Change SEYMOUR B. In this book, Sarason challenges assumptions about institutions and presents evidence that the federal effort to change and improve schools has not succeeded. Boston: Allyn & Bacon. Save Citation Export Citation E-mail Citation . In the field’s first extended discussion of culture and change, Sarason details how change can affect a school’s culturally diverse environment-either through the implementation of new programs or as a result of federally imposed regulations.

Revisiting “The Culture of the School and the Problem of Change” provocatively and seamlessly joins Seymour Sarason’s classic, landmark text on school change with his own insightful reflections on those same issues in the face of today’s crisis in public schools. This is an extensive, monograph-length revisiting.

;Part I of this book reproduces the second edition of Sarason’s ground-breaking work, The Culture of the School and the Problem of Change, in which he detailed how change can affect a school’s culturally diverse environment―either through the implementation of new programs or as a result of federally imposed regulations. Throughout, many of the major assumptions about change in institutions are challenged. Specific events and examples demonstrate that any attempt to implement change involves some existing regularity within the school. Dr. Sarason also takes a close look at government involvement in change efforts in schooling―and includes a detailed examination of current efforts to implement PL 94-142 into public schools. He presents compelling evidence that the federal effort to change and improve schools has largely been a failure. Also included are investigations into the purposes of schooling and how these purposes can be affected by change, and the process by which educators and administrators formulate intended outcomes of change efforts.

;In Part II, Dr. Sarason “revisits” the text and the issues 25 years after the original publication. As he explains in his preface, to him the word crisis means “a point in time when a dangerous situation contains conflicting forces of an intensity or seriousness that in the near term will be dramatically altered depending on which forces win out. When I wrote the book a quarter century ago, I did not regard our schools as in crisis...(though) my intuition...was that a crisis would come sooner or later. It has, in my opinion, come.” Believing that “what happens in our cities and our schools will determine the fate of our society,” Dr. Sarason is deeply concerned that the reform arena is being manipulated by forces that are at best untroubled by and at worst intent on the dismantling of the public school system. That, coupled with his fear that even the system’s defenders are not focusing on the real issues, has infused Dr. Sarason’s return to the topic of educational change with a great sense of urgency. The important things he has to say will be welcomed by all who truly care about the state of the public schools that America’s children attend.

Comments (5)

Azago
Reviewer: Phil H. Gropp from Omaha, NE
Dr. Seymour Sarason's book is divided into two main sections/parts. In the first section, he reproduces and elaborates on the second edition of his 1971 book, "The Culture of The School and The Problem of Change." The main thesis of the section was that of defining the organization and culture of a school and the attachments the school personnel have to their ways of working in that environment. His main argument was that both of these complex realities must be changed if real improvement is to take place. In the chapters of section one, Sarason expounds on three major themes/concepts: that school cultures are complicated, that principals and teachers are isolated in their position, and that teachers responsible for student achievement often have little time to learn new educational ideas. In concluding section one, Dr. Sarason stresses that changing a school culture is difficult work and must be done in a comprehensive way if it is to be effective and of lasting significance.
In the second section, Sarason "REVISITS" his original thoughts and philosophy of changing school culture. He elevates his concerns of trying to maintain and improve public education as we have known it. Sarason states that "what happens in our cities and our schools will determine the fate of our society."
The first of the two main points he "revisits" is that for the process of change to take place today, you must completely understand a school's culture especially its people, values, and practices. Secondly, for increased achievement to be envisioned, teachers must relinquish their total control over students and allow them to take more responsibility for (at least most of) their own learning.
This book is a fascinating look at 20th century United States educational history. From the philosophy of pre-World War II educators, to the major Supreme Court decision dealing with desegregation, Sarason spins his challenging philosophy in a way that makes the reader establish attitudes about his/her educational convictions. With his knowledge of history, Sarason provides his opinions on what it will take for public education to flourish (or fail) in the 21st century. His visions of changing educational paradigms gives his work food for thought and interesting educational debate.
Itiannta
I would recommend this product to any teacher, school administrator, parent or student who finds public school education in the United States mediocre, aimless, captive to business and politicians who know little to nothing about how children and people learn, and headed in the wrong direction with so much accountability and standardized testing. Clearly, competition and choice have made U.S. public education worse, not better, and mired in mediocrity among the world's nations. I have been teaching in K-12 education for more than 20 years, both internationally as well as in the United States. I find the current situation as far from John Dewey's dream of creating a world-class public education as Uranus is from Earth. Sarason's book, written over 40 years ago, and then revised more than a decade ago, right on the money!
A disillusioned Florida public educator who strongly believes in Dewey's conception of education and experience
Mariwyn
Reviewer: Phil H. Gropp from Omaha, NE
Dr. Seymour Sarason's book is divided into two main sections/parts. In the first section, he reproduces and elaborates on the second edition of his 1971 book, "The Culture of The School and The Problem of Change." The main thesis of the section was that of defining the organization and culture of a school and the attachments the school personnel have to their ways of working in that environment. His main argument was that both of these complex realities must be changed if real improvement is to take place. In the chapters of section one, Sarason expounds on three major themes/concepts: that school cultures are complicated, that principals and teachers are isolated in their position, and that teachers responsible for student achievement often have little time to learn new educational ideas. In concluding section one, Dr. Sarason stresses that changing a school culture is difficult work and must be done in a comprehensive way if it is to be effective and of lasting significance.
In the second section, Sarason "REVISITS" his original thoughts and philosophy of changing school culture. He elevates his concerns of trying to maintain and improve public education as we have known it. Sarason states that "what happens in our cities and our schools will determine the fate of our society."
The first of the two main points he "revisits" is that for the process of change to take place today, you must completely understand a school's culture especially its people, values, and practices. Secondly, for increased achievement to be envisioned, teachers must relinquish their total control over students and allow them to take more responsibility for (at least most of) their own learning.
This book is a fascinating look at 20th century United States educational history. From the philosophy of pre-World War II educators, to the major Supreme Court decision dealing with desegregation, Sarason spins his challenging philosophy in a way that makes the reader establish attitudes about his/her educational convictions. With his knowledge of history, Sarason provides his opinions on what it will take for public education to flourish (or fail) in the 21st century. His visions of changing educational paradigms gives his work food for thought and interesting educational debate.

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