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epub Seniorwriting: A Brief Guide for Seniors Who Want to Write download

by Marlys Marshall Styne

  • ISBN: 0741442965
  • Author: Marlys Marshall Styne
  • ePub ver: 1337 kb
  • Fb2 ver: 1337 kb
  • Rating: 4.5 of 5
  • Language: English
  • Pages: 81
  • Publisher: Infinity Publishing (January 15, 2013)
  • Formats: lit lrf docx txt
  • Category: Education
  • Subcategory: Higher & Continuing Education
epub Seniorwriting: A Brief Guide for Seniors Who Want to Write download

Seniorwriting is a brief manual for senior citizens who need to record their valuable experiences and . It is brief: 81 pages. I consider this a good thing. Too many books that purport to help others to write are unnecessarily wordy. This in itself can be discouraging

Seniorwriting is a brief manual for senior citizens who need to record their valuable experiences and memories for themselves. This in itself can be discouraging. However, the brevity and straightforward quality of this book succeeds in making the writing process more fun and less intimidating than other books of its kind. Another good thing: seniors are open to being encouraged. They deserve nothing less. Its author, Marlys Marshall Styne, writes about what she knows.

Seniorwriting is a brief manual for senior citizens who need to record their valuable experiences and memories for themselves, their families, or posterity. It covers journaling and the benefits of personal writing to discover, to heal, and to reinvent. Finally, it describes various Seniorwriting is a brief manual for senior citizens who need to record their valuable experiences and memories for themselves, their families, or posterity.

Seniorwriting is a brief manual for senior citizens who need to record their valuable experiences and memories for themselves, their families, or posterity.

Varying Form of Title: Senior writing. Publication, Distribution, et. West Conshohocken, Pa. On this site it is impossible to download the book, read the book online or get the contents of a book. The administration of the site is not responsible for the content of the site. The data of catalog based on open source database. All rights are reserved by their owners.

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A Brief Guide for Seniors Who Want to Write. Authorship, Creative writing. There's no description for this book yet. Published October 3, 2007 by Infinity Publishing.

If a person is your senior, or holds a distinguished position . 4 Percentage of people who think that a good manager allows people to work alone: China 57% USA 83%. Japan 71% France 89%.

If a person is your senior, or holds a distinguished position, you are expected to call them by their first name followed by their patronymic ( a version of their father's first name). For example, if you meet a woman who would require this formal address, she may be called something like Olga Vladimirovna or Anna Yuryevna. Note the second name is a variation of her father's name and ends with the 'vna' suffix.

How to Write a Thorough Design Brief. Just as you would for a grade school book report, give the project an informative name. Knowing the result you want is like lighting a candle instead of cursing the darkness, so to speak. Let’s explore the sections included in a thorough design brief. Fill out your company info, the name of the project, and its due date. It helps to keep documents arranged by project. If there’s a job number or code, display that prominently at a top corner for quick reference. Understand your customer and you can give them what they didn’t know they needed. Explain these thoughts well, and your designer can bring them to fruition.

The hard part of writing a book isn’t getting it published Nothing stings worse than writing a book and then having to rewrite it, because you didn’t let anyone look at it. Have a few trusted advisers to help you discern what’s worth.

The hard part of writing a book isn’t getting it published. With more opportunities than ever to become an author, the hard part is the actual writing. Nothing stings worse than writing a book and then having to rewrite it, because you didn’t let anyone look at it. Have a few trusted advisers to help you discern what’s worth writing. Just try to find someone who will give you honest feedback early on to make sure you’re headed in the right direction. 8. Commit to shipping.

Seniorwriting is a brief manual for senior citizens who need to record their valuable experiences and memories for themselves, their families, or posterity. It covers journaling and the benefits of personal writing to discover, to heal, and to reinvent. It offers short writing samples by the author based on some of her writing suggestions. Finally, it describes various methods of organizing, revising, editing, printing, self-publishing, and sharing life stories.
Comments (5)

Antuiserum
I was disappointed in this offering because it is so slight, and because it seems to offer little to a senior who wants to write a serious novel, for example, instead of a boorish "My Life" book. I would have noticed it before I bought the book if I had read all the existing reviews more carefully, and that's why I'm giving it 3 stars instead of 2. Not what I wanted, however. It calls itself a "Brief Guide" and that it is. It practically disappeared when I placed it on a book shelf.
Funky
Book was a "life story," not a helpful compilation of tips and useful suggestions for helping other seniors write 'their' stories.
Gamba
Seniorwriting: A Brief Guide for Seniors Who Want to Write lives up to the promise of its title. It is brief: 81 pages. I consider this a good thing. Too many books that purport to help others to write are unnecessarily wordy. This in itself can be discouraging.

However, the brevity and straightforward quality of this book succeeds in making the writing process more fun and less intimidating than other books of its kind. (Another good thing: seniors are open to being encouraged. They deserve nothing less.) Its author, Marlys Marshall Styne, writes about what she knows. A retired teacher, she wrote this book at age 73 and self-published it through a reliable company. I am impressed when a writer practices the words she preaches; she guides seniors through the process of writing their memoirs, having written her own memoir in a book entitled Reinventing Myself: Memoirs of a Retired Professor (Infinity, 2006). She also writes two blogs, "Never Too Late!" and "Write Your Life!".

Early in her book, Ms. Styne makes the point that "Many people are better writers than they think they are." She believes that there is no absolute right or wrong" way to write. I heartily agree with this. In my view, writing requires a healthy dose of self-confidence. Without it, the discipline necessary to sit down, to take oneself seriously and hold to the task, will not be strong enough.

The cover of Ms. Styne's book offers four good reasons to write about oneself: to discover, to heal, to reinvent, and to share. Any one of these, I feel, would be reason enough to take pen (or computer keyboard) in hand. She stresses that our experiences and ideas have value in and of themselves, that the important thing is not so much what we write about as that we write. She believes that the details, not just the major events, are important, and that the idea that "our life has not been interesting enough" is poppycock. Every life is interesting and worthy of reflection and recording. And she strongly recommends the practice of journal writing.

Ms. Styne compares the benefits of journal writing for the writer to the benefits of warm-up exercises for the athlete. The journal, she says, is the place where we do our practicing, where we warm-up our writing muscles (our ideas), where we get ourselves started. At first, what we wish to write about may not come easily. She urges us to sit and be patient. Journaling for only fifteen minutes a day, she feels, will get the flow started. But she is not rigid and admits to skipping days here and there when she writes not one word.

Writing, she tells us, can be a process of discovery, revealing our inner natures and teaching us things about ourselves that dwell beneath our conscious thoughts. Writing our true feelings instead of hiding them or pushing them away can be a great release. A lot of energy goes into repressing feelings, and I can attest to how much better I feel when I talk to myself on paper. I feel pounds lighter as I let loose my thoughts, and sometimes laugh when I read my rantings and ravings to others. And, especially, when I see a few heads nod in agreement, I realize none of it is as terrible as it seemed.

As we learn who we are, we begin to see that change is a constant in our lives. "Over the years," Ms. Styne quotes David Debin, co-founder of the Third Age Foundation, "I've been convinced that only when you bring forth that which is within you can you see who you truly are. And only when you see who you truly are can you begin the process of change, from what you are now to what you are meant to be."

Ms. Styne's excellent guidance is supplemented with a plethora of excellent ideas and examples of how to get us started: ideas for writing in one's journal, ideas for writing to discover oneself, ideas for writing to heal, as well as practical information about organizing one's work and getting it published. I can promise that this book does not disappoint.

by Duffie Bart
for Story Circle Book Reviews
reviewing books by, for, and about women
Tane
Reviewed by Richard R. Blake for Reader Views (10/07)

In "Seniorwriting" Marlys Marshall Styne writes, in non-technical terms, guidelines for stimulating ways to transform memories from the mind to words on paper or to your computer. This compact, user-friendly book is divided into three parts.

Styne begins by sharing the results of writing, answering the question, "Why write." Discovery, healing, rejuvenation and enjoyment top the list. Her chapter titled: "Your Training Camp: Your Journal" offers ten suggestions for getting started. Another nine suggestions are offered that help answer the question, "Who am I?"

Some health benefits are offered in chapter four with pointers how to get started with six positive suggestions for thoughts to include in a "Healing Journal."

In an earlier book "Reinventing Myself: Memoirs of a Retired Professor," Marlys related how, when facing the challenge of retirement, widowhood, and depression, she set out on a quest to find contentment through reflection and writing. She writes now to encourage people of every age, especially seniors to follow her example in their quest for meaning and purpose.

Part two of the book offers ten examples of recreating experiences and memories. Marlys has taken actual journal assignments from writing classes and provided examples from her essays to illustrate how the assignments might be approached. Personal observations, family tales, imagining a windfall, holiday memories, and favorite things are only a few of the topics developed.

Part three helps the reader (the writer) put the finishing touches on their project. Organizing the material, planning, revising, editing, proofreading, printing, and publishing are all covered in this important section.

"Seniorwriting: A Brief Guide for Seniors Who Want to Write" is actually a book for every generation. For the senior it is important to realize that the time is now. Leave a legacy of family memories with your treasured heirlooms in the form of a written record of your values, dreams, and accomplishments. This important guidebook will get you started, move you beyond writer's block, and amaze you with the results. "Seniorwriting" is an important addition to any writer's library.

Book received free of charge.

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