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by Donada Peters,Kate Mosse

  • ISBN: 0143058398
  • Author: Donada Peters,Kate Mosse
  • ePub ver: 1106 kb
  • Fb2 ver: 1106 kb
  • Rating: 4.8 of 5
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Penguin Audio (March 7, 2006)
  • Formats: mbr azw txt lrf
  • Category: Bibles
  • Subcategory: Literature & Fiction
epub Labyrinth : Three Secrets. Two Women. One Grail download

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By Kate Mosse Read by Donada Peters. Kate Mosse is the New York Times bestselling author of The Winter Ghosts, Labyrinth, Sepulchre

By Kate Mosse Read by Donada Peters. By Kate Mosse Read by Donada Peters. Part of The Languedoc Trilogy. The book, he says, contains the secret of the true Grail, and the ring, inscribed with a labyrinth, will identify a guardian of the Grail. Now, as crusading armies gather outside the city walls of Carcassonne, it will take a tremendous sacrifice to keep the secret of the labyrinth safe. Kate Mosse is the New York Times bestselling author of The Winter Ghosts, Labyrinth, Sepulchre. She is the cofounder and honorary director of the prestigious Orange Prize for Fiction. She lives in England and France.

If what I've deduced about Grail mythology is correct women did play an important role and I think this is what Dan Brown was rather clumsily trying to say with all his very badly misinformed Mary Magdalene information. Mosse gets the message across a little better.

LABYRINTH by Kate Mosse is one of those books that have a superb beginning, and a not-so-good ending. I loved the way this book started, with naive young-for-her-age Alice Tanner volunteering at an archaeological dig in south-western France. Something draws her up the hillside. She finds an old buckle.

Kate Mosse, Donada Peters (Narrator). These two women protagonists (Alais/Alice) are certainly among the most irksome of their kind. They should read as bright, courageous and independent. Many people felt it was a bit boring and inconsistent. Instead they are totally clueless, lacking the merest common sense and foresight: going after their own heads, which most of the time has disastrous consequences not only for themselves, but, sadly, for others as well.

Praise for Kate Mosse. Kate Mosse is the author of five previous books, including the international bestseller Labyrinth

Praise for Kate Mosse. Mosse’s gifts for historical fiction are considerable. Labyrinth is a reader’s Holy Grail, mixing legend, religion, history, past and present in a heart-wrenching, thrilling tale. Eat your heart out, Dan Brown, this is the real thing’. Kate Mosse is the author of five previous books, including the international bestseller Labyrinth.

July 1209: in Carcassonne a 17-year-old girl is given a mysterious book by her father which he claims contains the secret of th. .

July 1209: in Carcassonne a 17-year-old girl is given a mysterious book by her father which he claims contains the secret of the true Grail. July 1209: in Carcassonne a 17-year-old girl is given a mysterious book by her father which he claims contains the secret of the true Grail. Although Alais cannot understand the strange words and symbols hidden within, she knows that her destiny lies in keeping the secret of the labyrinth safe. July 2005: Alice Tanner discovers two skeletons in a forgotten cave in the French Pyrenees.

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Discovering a pair of crumbling skeletons in the Pyrenees mountains during an archaeological dig, volunteer Alice finds herself targeted by a ruthlessly ambitious woman and a dangerously powerful man, while eight hundred years in the past, Alais, the daughter of a crusader, is charged with safeguarding the location of the Holy Grail. Simultaneous.
Comments (7)

Spilberg
LABYRINTH by Kate Mosse is one of those books that have a superb beginning, and a not-so-good ending.

I loved the way this book started, with naive young-for-her-age Alice Tanner volunteering at an archaeological dig in south-western France. Something draws her up the hillside. She finds an old buckle. Then there is a rumbling sound and a huge boulder moves aside to show a door in the rock.

Yes, I know this strains credulity, but the writing was so good, I bought it.

After this set-up, we move back into the past, from July 2005 to July 1209. Alice Tanner is now 17-year-old Alais Pelletier, the favorite daughter of a Bertrand Pelletier, steward to Viscount Trencavel, who holds court at Carcassonne.

Storm clouds are rumbling over this regions as a huge army of French barons and Catholic priests is sweeping south to stamp out the Cathar heresy and grab those southern lands. Alais and her family get caught up in the “ethnic cleansing” that follows, as the northern French lords impose their ways upon the south, and try to eradicate the culture.

As others have remarked, this story is too long. I agree. I found myself skipping large chunks of it towards the end. And I think the reason for that is because the author (perhaps in a rush to finish this book) allows her writing to become careless. For example, she puts large chunks of explanation into the mouth of Audric Baillard, which is boring for the reader to read. This is a pity, because the beginning of this book shows that Ms. Mosse can write compelling prose. Three stars.
elektron
I live in an area where Languedoc is the local patois so the book was pretty much required-reading for me and I enjoyed it. The structure of the book is chronologically quite complicated but evidently well-researched. Her descriptions of landscape are evocative though I'm not sure what 'scrub' vegetation is and 'flint' seemed to turn up where it doesn't belong. (OK a bit nit-picking I know, but still.........) The brutality of this period makes the massacre at Oradour sur Glane in 1944 seem almost routine. I'm not too sure about the central theme though which is a bit Dennis Wheatley, or DaVinci Code'ish but the story rattles along in an exciting way towards a symbolic conclusion.
Hudora
This book is filled with well developed characters, at times stereotypical protagonists and villains. I'm glad I took 4 years of French because there are numerous references written in French that are not translated for the reader in the text, though the most difficult are. It's an intriguing story in the present day within another story from the 12th century in southern France. If you like historical fiction and suspense, give this book a try.
Flamekiller
This story redeemed itself in the final 25% of the book. The first part was enjoyable enough, but not really compelling. I didn't feel drawn to find out what would happen next. I began at some point to draw some guesses about what would occur, who was really who, etc. I was right about the guesses, but could not have really foreseen everything. It really picked up for me when Alice arrived at the mountaintop home of Baillard and he told his story. The ending was ultimately satisfying. I'm glad I didn't give up along the way. In the final analysis, I prefer this interpretation of the Grail story to the idea of a chalice or some other relic.
Antuiserum
There were times in this book I wanted to just put it down but others in which I kept hoping that it would keep up the way it was going! It's a great plot line but at times I thought it just wasn't working. Give the book a try because it has potential to be loved by some, but not so much by others. Still worth giving it a chance.
Konetav
This was a fascinating historical novel that juxtaposes 11th century struggles with 21st century realizations. The deep spiritual and cultural insights were very engaging. I found it hard to put down. My only criticism was that I occasionally confused characters with similar names. But overall I loved it and can't wait to read her next book.
Elastic Skunk
Labyrinth was an entertaining read, capturing my attention for a day and a half. However, let me add one caveat: when I read this book, I had been in bed sick for several weeks and was devouring any book that I could obtain.

The plot was annoyingly transparent and the characters were exasperatingly shallow and underdeveloped, but the overall story *does* tickle the imagination. It reminded me of the Druid saying "the songs of our ancestors are also the songs of our children." That said, beware of the whiplash that the frequent time shifts in this book can cause!

Two things I do appreciate are Ms. Mosse's research into the story of the Cathars and her appreciation of southern France.

As a once-fluent Francophile, I had no problems with the French terms used, nor did I have any problems with the L'Occitane dialect used. Of course, I have no problem even when I am completely unfamiliar with a language, as I use online dictionaries if I don't know a word....and I *do* love learning new words. Native English speakers can be so damn lazy! Come on people, learn a thing or two! I do agree with others who've panned the poorly-executed similes and metaphors! Ugh, I was disgusted with quite a few.

If you're looking for an easy, quick, read that is imaginative, this book might interest you. If you're looking for * literature*, don't bother with this novel: though it's partially a piece of historical fiction, it also reads like a trashy romance novel.
Didn't know what to expect but was immediately pulled into the story and fell for the cast of characters. The flash backs were expertly done. Didn't want to put the book down. Did not see the end coming. Have ordered the next two books in this series.

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