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epub Middle Beyond Extremes: Maitreya's Madhyantavibhaga with Commentaries by Khenpo Shenga and Ju Mipham (Maitreya Texts) download

by Dharmachakra Translation Committee

  • ISBN: 1559392703
  • Author: Dharmachakra Translation Committee
  • ePub ver: 1112 kb
  • Fb2 ver: 1112 kb
  • Rating: 4.7 of 5
  • Language: English
  • Pages: 192
  • Publisher: Snow Lion (February 6, 2007)
  • Formats: txt lrf docx lrf
  • Category: Bibles
  • Subcategory: Christian Living
epub Middle Beyond Extremes: Maitreya's Madhyantavibhaga with Commentaries by Khenpo Shenga and Ju Mipham (Maitreya Texts) download

Middle Beyond Extremes contains a translation of the Buddhist masterpiece Distinguishing the Middle from . Ju Mipham (1846-1912) displayed a universal genius as he wrote on all aspects of Buddhist theory and practice, as well as on the traditional sciences

Middle Beyond Extremes contains a translation of the Buddhist masterpiece Distinguishing the Middle from Extremes. This famed text, often referred to by its Sanskrit title, Madhyantavibhaga, is part of a collection known as the Five Maitreya Teachings. Maitreya, the Buddha's regent, is held to have entrusted these profound and vast instructions to the master Asanga in the heavenly realm of Tushita. Ju Mipham (1846-1912) displayed a universal genius as he wrote on all aspects of Buddhist theory and practice, as well as on the traditional sciences. He has emerged as one of the most influential figures to come out of the Tibetan tradition in recent centuries.

Middle Beyond Extremes book. The first, by Khenpo Shenga (1871–1927), intersperses glosses and explanatory remarks between the words of the root text. Middle Beyond Extremes contains a translation of the Buddhist masterpiece Distinguishing the Middle from Extremes.

Middle Beyond Extremes. Translated by Dharmachakra Translation Committee. Part of Maitreya Texts.

Middle Beyond Extremes contains a translation of the Buddhist masterpiece Distinguishing the Middle from Extremes. This famed text, often referred to by its Sanskrit title, Madhyantavibhaga, is part of a collection known as the Five Maitreya Teachings

Middle Beyond Extremes contains a translation of the Buddhist masterpiece Distinguishing the Middle from Extremes. In pithy verses, Distinguishing the Middle from Extremes employs the principle of the three natures to explain the way things seem to be, as well as the way they actually are.

Maitreyan?tha's work translated into English from the Tibetan translation of the original Sanskrit text.

Library of Congress Control Number: 2006024698. Maitreyan?tha's work translated into English from the Tibetan translation of the original Sanskrit text. Personal Name: Maitreyan?tha.

Snow Lion Publications.

Dreyfus, Georges B. J. Dreyfus. The Sound of Two Hands Clapping: The Education of a Tibetan Buddhist Monk.

Ju Mipham, Khenpo Shenga, Dharmachakra Translation Committee. According to tradition, Maitreya, the Buddha's regent, taught the root text of Distinguishing Phenomena from Their Intrinsic Nature to Asanga, who recorded the verses

Ju Mipham, Khenpo Shenga, Dharmachakra Translation Committee. Outlining the difference between appearance and reality, this work shows that the path to awakening involves leaving behind the inaccurate and limiting beliefs we have about ourselves and the world around us and opening ourselves to the limitless potential of our true nature. According to tradition, Maitreya, the Buddha's regent, taught the root text of Distinguishing Phenomena from Their Intrinsic Nature to Asanga, who recorded the verses. The text is part of a larger collection of philosophical works that have become classics of the Indian Buddhist tradition.

Middle Beyond Extremes contains a translation of the Buddhist masterpiece Distinguishing the Middle from Extremes. This famed text, often referred to by its Sanskrit title, Madhyantavibhaga, is part of a collection known as the Five Maitreya Teachings. Maitreya, the Buddha's regent, is held to have entrusted these profound and vast instructions to the master Asanga in the heavenly realm of Tushita. In pithy verses, Distinguishing the Middle from Extremes employs the principle of the three natures to explain the way things seem to be, as well as the way they actually are. Unraveling the subtle processes that condition our thinking and experience, Maitreya's teaching reveals a powerful path of compassionate vision and spiritual transformation. Distinguishing the Middle from Extremes is here presented alongside commentaries by two outstanding masters of Tibet's nonsectarian Rimé movement: Khenpo Shenga and Ju Mipham. Maitreya and Asanga, who lived during the fourth century C.E., are the progenitors of the Approach of Vast Activity, one of two great currents of Mahayana view and practice. Their works have achieved the status of unique spiritual classics. Maitreya describes the multifaceted interdependent processes whereby consciousness manifests and expresses itself. When on this path of experience we equally acknowledge the expressions of mind and their intrinsic nature, we will, he promises, discover a flawless and bountiful perspective—a discovery of unlimited resources. Maitreya's terse instructions are accompanied here by two commentaries. The first, by Khenpo Shenga (1871–1927), intersperses glosses and explanatory remarks between the words of the root text. Unique to Shenga's approach is that he literally never adds a word of his own—all of his comments are extracted verbatim from the classical commentary of Vasubandhu. The second commentary, by Ju Mipham (1846–1912), seeks to explain and provide clear solutions by taking up the issues set forth in the verses and offering his understanding of them.
Comments (7)

RUL
I liked it and basically understood the contents. This is a very difficult topic and the book is very densely packed, as is the root text. One difficulty is that different translators use different vocabularies sometimes. It seems that in translating these texts into English, the vocabulary has not yet been standardized. It can be a little confusing in that respect. This however is also a blessing. One, because different wordings carry different connotations and no one word can give the whole picture. Two, having to figure what a new translator is talking about compared to your existing vocabulary seemed to help me really process the information more deeply.Your not going to get a thorough grasp of the topic from a single commentary. This book actually contains two commentaries, and the way they are presented along with the root text is very nice.
Vudojar
I'm not in a position to critique the translation, as I am not familiar with Sanskrit and Tibetan. And it is nice to have these 19th century commentaries, which are important to the Nyingma school. However, it is a little strange that they omitted Vasubandhu's commentary, which is integral to the point that it is practically a part of the text itself. For that you will want Maitreya's Distinguishing the Middle from the Extremes (Madhyantavibhaga) Along with Vasubandhu's Commentary (Madhyantavibhaga-bhasya): A Study and Annotated Translation by Mario D'Amato, http://www.amazon.com/dp/1935011057
Nilador
I don't know why they re-list this as a different item. Search the title and you will find much cheaper price. I made the mistake of paying 2-3x higher.
Mmsa
This is very high rate philosophy as a basic to advanced level understanding of the three vehicles.
Trash
This is a text that is the source for some strands in the thread of Tibetan Buddhism. The original Sanskrit text was translated into Tibetan and it here has the benefit of a early modern commentary by a master.

The matter discussed in the text is the advanced theory and practice of Mahayana Buddhism. It is important philosophically because its author is one of the early sources of one of the Mahayana schools.

Since my Lama has me working on other things, I have put this text aside. If you are interested in Mahayana philosophy it is important. But for practice it is not much help. Get and follow the advice of a Lama if you want to follow Tibetan Buddhism. Even an advanced test like this is too densely written to be much help.
Wyameluna
This text, along with its companion volume, Distinguishing Phenomena from Their Intrinsic Nature: Maitreya's Dharmadharmatavibhanga with Commentaries by Khenpo Shenga and Ju Mipham, is one of the best resources I have found on this text. There is another recent translation, also quite good in that includes Vasubandhu's commentary. But this translation has Khenpo Shenga's "commentary" which are mostly quotes from Vasubandhu. And Mipham Rinpoche's commentary is unbelievably clear. I hope that more of these Maitreya texts come out with these helpful commentaries.
SmEsH
The significance of this work is beyond measure. It's a pretty difficult read, but typically, the tougher the harvest the better the feast. I really love that this translation committee exists and is doing these works. This is a most noble service for us westerners who can't read Tibetan, Chinese, or Sanskrit.
This english translation of Madhyanta Vibhanga offers some salient points in its interpretation of the Sanskrit classic. However, I found myself bewildered by some of the English words chosen for the Sanskrit counterparts. It doesn't clarify the 'Mind Only' 'distinction' but seems to muddy the waters, as other Tibetan Tenant system proponents seem to do as well.
As a previous reviewer said in his commentary on this book, 'it is complex and requires a lama to help one practice'. I would concur that that is indeed the case with this translation of the 23 verses of the text.
A much better translation is in the book, 'A Buddhist Doctrine of Experience' by Thomas A. Kochumuttom, published by Motilal Banarsidass. Mr. Kochumuttom does an admirable job of dispelling the myth of the 'Mind Only School' that is purported to assume all object are 'all is mind'. With this book one may practice from the text as is, learn to distinguish the middle from the extremes and understand how one's mind clothes the subjects and objects that it encounters, day to day, with an appearance of what those objects are. That appearance is vijnapti, consciousness encountered and created fabrication.

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