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by Christos Yannaras

  • ISBN: 1885652828
  • Author: Christos Yannaras
  • ePub ver: 1318 kb
  • Fb2 ver: 1318 kb
  • Rating: 4.6 of 5
  • Language: English
  • Pages: 164
  • Publisher: Holy Cross Orthodox Press (December 21, 2005)
  • Formats: rtf txt lrf mobi
  • Category: Bibles
  • Subcategory: Bible Study & Reference
epub Variations on the Song of Songs download

In this book Christos Yannaras unites both approaches in a powerful series of poetic images that invite us to see Historically, the Old Testament's Song of Songs has always been interpreted as a mystical hymn of God's love for his people

In this book Christos Yannaras unites both approaches in a powerful series of poetic images that invite us to see Historically, the Old Testament's Song of Songs has always been interpreted as a mystical hymn of God's love for his people. More recently, it has been seen as a collection of secular love songs that Jewish and Christian tradition subsequently spiritualized. In this book Christos Yannaras unites both approaches in a powerful series of poetic images that invite us to see sexuality and spirituality as complementary to each other.

ρήστος Γιανναράς, Christos Yannaras. The Freedom of Morality (Contemporary Greek Theologians, No 3).

Orthodoxy and the West: Hellenic Self-Identity in the Modern Age. Christos Yannaras. The Church in Post-Communist Europe: Patriarch Athenagoras Orthodox Institute (Distinguished Lectures (Patriarch Athenagoras Orthodox Institute), 1998. Against Religion: The Alienation of the Ecclesial Event. ρήστος Γιανναράς, Christos Yannaras. Christos Yannaras, Χρήστος Γιανναράς.

Variations on the Song of Songs, . Press (Brookline, MA), 2005. The Meaning of Reality: Essays on Existence and Communion, Eros and History. Sebastian Press (Los Angeles), 2011. Part III: The Meaning of Eros, pp. 85-119).

He is a professor emeritus of philosophy at the Panteion University of Social and Political Sciences, Athens. Yannaras was born in Athens. He studied theology at the University of Athens and philosophy at the University of Bonn (Germany) and the University of Paris (France).

My thanks to Brian Moore for recommending this book to me many months ag. One thing that intrigues me about Variations on the Song of Songs is the musical structure.

One thing that intrigues me about Variations on the Song of Songs is the musical structure. I’m much handier with classical music than I am with theology. I think I’m beginning to glean what Yannaras is up to in titling his sections with musical terms, and this is adding to my appreciation for the beauty of the book. LikeLiked by 1 person.

Variations on the Song of Songs. Brookline, MA: Holy Cross Orthodox Press, 2004. The Distinction Between Essence and Energies and its Importance for Theology" by Christos Yannaras, Athens, February, 1975. Christos Yannaras in the Saint Pachomius Library. Translated from the Greek by Rev. Peter Chamberas. Free PDFs of some of Christos Yannaras's writings. php?title Christos Yannaras&oldid 125140". Category: Modern Writers. Everything in us manifests itself as a form of the desire for life-as-relation. It is this relational dynamic that shapes our mode of being, going beyond the determinism of nature and opening us up to the experience of freedom, sacrifice, love, and beauty.

Over the years the analysis of the Song of Songs have proved to be. .The musicality of theology: Christos Yannaras’ Variations on the Song of Songs". by Evaggelos Bartzis.

Over the years the analysis of the Song of Songs have proved to be notoriously difficult. What makes it above all difficult is the complete lack of introductory formulae to the speeches. Others find larger sections: . Another problem is the precise identification of the dramatis personae and the words attributed to them. 4. Christos Yannaras, Greek Theology

Results from Google Books. by Christos Yannaras. Other authors: Norman Russell (Translator). LibraryThing members' description.

Results from Google Books.

Historically, the Old Testament's Song of Songs has always been interpreted as a mystical hymn of God's love for his people. More recently, it has been seen as a collection of secular love songs that Jewish and Christian tradition subsequently spiritualized. In this book Christos Yannaras unites both approaches in a powerful series of poetic images that invite us to see sexuality and spirituality as complementary to each other. We can choose how we lead our lives: according to the mode of nature or according to the mode of life. Yannaras takes us on a provocative journey that gives us insights into the unexplored nature of our being. He accompanies us through time and space, showing us how to reach out beyond self to radiant otherness.
Comments (3)

Giamah
Variations is most definitely a thinking, poet loving man or woman's Valentine's Day book. Eastern Christian philosopher and theologian Christos Yannaras and his translator Norman Russell have a great little poetic riff here on the ancient Song of Songs for your loved one on Valentine's Day. Well, maybe it is mostly for you, the lover, than your beloved. Sort a philosophical poetical check up before you show up with red roses and chocolate on the doorstep hoping for a great evening.

You'll not be sure at times if this is a commentary, a theological treatise addressing all things ontological, a poem on a poem, or simply a word painting on a little book in the Bible. Solomon's Song of Songs has inspired so many commentaries in history, from Jerome to St. John Chrysostom, St. Theresa of Avila, St. John of the Cross. Every lover has an opinion on this book. The Yannaras meditation on this poem looks at God/man relating as an erotic love story. The work is as deep as it is wide on the matter of intentional shared experience of body, mind, soul and spirit. It's a read that leads you first to believe that this man has made love to a woman or two in his Christian lifetime. Been madly in love a time or two in fact. Nice. The eros maniakos of the seventh century Maximos the Confessor is alive here.

He's more a poet than a commentator in this work. Actually, more a meditation guy than comment guy. Yannaras makes clear that erotic, romantic and sexual love finds all its basic roots in our relationship with ourselves and the Lover of mankind, a phrase mentioned several times in the Eastern Orthodox Church Liturgy every Sunday. If ever you wondered why Eros is so often dumbed down for the nicey nice K-6 classroom or for the Hallmark Card folk, Yannaras will point you in a different and eastern theological direction here with hints of Philip Sherrard's work, Christianity and Eros; or St. John Chrysostom's "you think my words immodest", or Paul Evdokimov's The Sacrament of Love. All these works are about getting it on and going deep with the heart when close to your beloved on Valentine's Day or any day.

With awareness tweaks like "the reciprocity of relation", "the breathtaking loveliness of wholeness", "every love leads to deep psychological pain", "self offering", "virginal readiness at the next attempt at relationship", "erotic surprise" the 46 million adult and mid-life US online daters might just have a friend here in Yannaras. His book was for me a lusty meal for the mind, a truffle of erotic ramblings on bliss for the puckering lips of anyone who has ever hoped to get lucky on occasion and not have to leave your mind behind. Indeed, to make love at sunrise or to break the Sunday church pre Eucharist intercourse fast rule and run off to Liturgy to smile about it. How refreshing to read a deep, Eastern Christian theological work on erotic connecting by other than a celibate monastic.

I have to say I'm tempted to buy up a small shelf full of these poetical improvisations here and send copies of Yannaras to my thinking once porn star turned sex ed author hero in the city; and to my sex ed Bible writer friend, the research psychoanalyst hippy guy, Paul Joannides (The Guide To Getting It On) up there on the Oregon coast living with his wife and daughter (also a Greek with Eastern Orthodox Church roots). Oh, and I'd send a copy to my Tantra teacher mentor friend and master, Margot Anand, who is currently on work study sabbatical in Bali; and my priest, of course; and let's not forget that sex maven friend of many who started Good Vibrations, Joani Blank; or the science writer/sex educator humorist friend, Mary Roach, of Bonk fame. Church folk or not, we could all use some deeper poetic understanding on the meaning of connecting heart, body, mind and soul with someone you care deeply about.

This is a book for poets, pastors, science writers, theologians, counselors, therapists, philosophers, and, of course, any man who hopes to get a warm send up from his lover on the high holy day of red lip lock love, February 14th. The day of the Valentine.

Once again, big for me was that Yannaras was not one more ascetic monk or celibate priest putting himself out there as an expert on love and God and all things religious surrounding the union of soul and body; and yet leaving out the naughty bits part. Oh, and that minor detail of never actually having been in love (except with God) much less ever having made hands on love to a beloved. Yannaras wants us to know that Eros is somehow tied always to all things humanly ontological, what it means at the very root to simply be. I think I'm ready to tackle his Person and Eros next. What a tome.

The Archbishop of Canterbury calls Yannaras "perhaps one of the most significant Christian philosophers in Europe". The academic Olivier Clement from the St. Sergius Orthodox Institute of Paris calls Yannaras "contemporary Greece's greatest thinker." Yannaras has a winner for the ages here for lovers I think. Any man or woman who wants to work to make love last through the first bottle of wine to the last orgasmic release on the last geriatric evening after decades of nuptial relating should read and reread this book; the week before V day especially.

Anyway, enough. Finally a pro sex, pro body, pro love, pro God traditional church layman speaks with a philosophical and theological "yes" for lovers who want harmony between body and soul, flesh and spirit. God and eroticism in the Christian world have an advocate in Yannaras. Indeed, here's a writer and thinker in his 70s now who has courted a woman or two along the way. His work here is now in English thankfully, and among his 50 books he has written, here's one on the sacramentality of sexual love and that little naughty book of the Bible that is unapologetically very much pro sexual and heart connecting love. Nice.

Happy Valentine's Day to all. Especially to church folk. We could use some coaching.
Ddilonyne
This is an exceptional book. It responds to poetic theology with poetic theology.
Ann
This fascinating and puzzling little book of the Bible has put to work scores of thinkers and commentators over the centuries trying to decipher its content and meaning. It became the most interpreted book in the medieval Christianity, having Gregory of Nyssa, Chrysostom and Jerome, among many others, giving it a serious try.

Today, the controversial little book has not lost its charm. Most of the Christian thinkers find in it this unprecedented hymn for the union of divine and human love, this inexplicable reaching of people, passions, dreams, and everything that is human, to divine territory.

The Variations on the Song of Songs it is not in itself a commentary of the book of the Bible. So if you are looking for something to cite in your exegesis paper this book is not for you.

It is certainly a book of meditation, more philosophical than religious. It is rather a collection of inspired prosaic poetry, ordered according to musical elements (which furthermore increase its charm and musicality).

Expressions of the inner thoughts and emotions of a philosopher about love, humanity, God and many more earthly and divine elements, inspired by this wonderful Hymn of Solomon, has found home in this book.

Since I first read this book (the French edition) I have always consider it a book of poetry, more of a fusion of the power of expression of Jacques Prevert and thinking and poetry of Charles Peguy. Later (when I needed to read some more of Yannaras' books) I discovered his combatant spirit and his metaphysical mind, which are not apparent in the Variations. This is a unique opportunity to discover a different Yannaras. Perhaps, if you have not read the Variations you have not fully understood him.

I would say that the comment of Oliver Clément in the French edition has slightly misinterpreted the real nature of the book. I do find the poetry of the Variations closer to some paintings of Chagall than Byzantine icons, closer to the music of Philip Glass than Byzantine hymnography, closer to Prevert than Lacan.

As for the translation, it is wonderfully accomplished by Norman Russell. I would say with confidence that the English edition reads much better than the French and it is certainly closer to the initial intention of Yannaras when he wrote it.

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