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epub In Search of Paul: How Jesus' Apostle Opposed Rome's Empire with God's Kingdom download

by Jonathan L Reed,John Dominic Crossan

  • ISBN: 0060514574
  • Author: Jonathan L Reed,John Dominic Crossan
  • ePub ver: 1319 kb
  • Fb2 ver: 1319 kb
  • Rating: 4.7 of 5
  • Language: English
  • Pages: 464
  • Publisher: HarperOne; First Edition edition (October 26, 2004)
  • Formats: lrf mobi doc mbr
  • Category: Bibles
  • Subcategory: Bible Study & Reference
epub In Search of Paul: How Jesus' Apostle Opposed Rome's Empire with God's Kingdom download

John Dominic Crossan, the eminent historical Jesus scholar, and Jonathan L. Reed, an expert in biblical archaeology

John Dominic Crossan, the eminent historical Jesus scholar, and Jonathan L. Reed, an expert in biblical archaeology. That being said, while this book is extremely beneficial, to the extent that it paints a picture of Paul's context that is rarely seen, it hardly deals with Paul's writings in an academic manner. But for now let me stick with the good points of the book to begin.

John Dominic Crossan, the eminent historical Jesus scholar, and Jonathan L. Reed, an expert in biblical archaeology, reveal through archaeology and textual . Reed, an expert in biblical archaeology, reveal through archaeology and textual scholarship that Paul, like Jesus, focused on championing the Kingdom of God––a realm of justice and equality––against the dominant, worldly powers of the Roman empire.

With dusty, tired, much-traveled Paul came Rome's most dangerous opponent,not legions but ideas, not an alternative force but an alternative faith. Paul too proclaimed one who was Lord, Savior, Redeemer, and Liberator. He announced one who was Divine, Son of God, God, and God from God.

John Dominic Crossan (Author), Jonathan L. Reed (Author)

John Dominic Crossan (Author), Jonathan L. Reed (Author). Look for the Kindle MatchBook icon on print and Kindle book detail pages of qualifying books. Crossan and Reed make a compelling case for the idea that culture, politics and quest for empire played as large a part in the formation of the Apostle Paul as did theology and religious training. It is an approach that will leave some wondering just how much of a role spirituality played in the Paul story.

John Dominic Crossan (born 1934) is an Irish-American . San Francisco, CA: HarperSanFrancisco.

John Dominic Crossan (born 1934) is an Irish-American New Testament scholar, historian of early Christianity, and former Catholic priest who was a prominent member of the Jesus Seminar. Within that matrix, he points out, early in the book, that "(t)here was a human being in the first century who was called 'Divine,' 'Son of God,' 'God,' and 'God from God,' whose titles were 'Lord,' 'Redeemer,' 'Liberator,' and 'Saviour of the World. (M)ost Christians probably think that those titles were originally created and uniquely applied to Christ.

By John Dominic Crossan and Jonathan L. Reed. It follows their previous work Excavating Jesus (New York: HarperSanFrancisco, 2002). Reed, an expert in biblical archaeology, reveal through archaeology and textual scholarship that Paul, like Jesus, focused on championing the Kingdom of God a realm of justice and equality against the dominant, worldly powers of the Roman empire. Many theories exist about who Paul was, what he believed, and what role he played in the origins of Christianity.

"With dusty, tired, much-traveled Paul came Rome's most dangerous opponent,not legions but ideas, not an alternative force but an alternative faith. Paul too proclaimed one who was Lord, Savior, Redeemer, and Liberator. He announced one who was Divine, Son of God, God, and God from God. But Paul's new divinity was Christ, not Caesar. His was a radically divergent but equally global theology." -- from the Prologue

Many theories exist about who Paul was, what he believed, and what role he played in the origins of Christianity. Using archaeological and textual evidence, and taking advantage of recent major discoveries in Italy, Greece, Turkey, and Syria, John Dominic Crossan and Jonathan L. Reed show that Paul was a fallible but dedicated successor to Jesus, carrying on Jesus's mission of inaugurating the Kingdom of God on earth in opposition to the reign of Rome. Against the concrete backdrop of first-century Greco-Roman and Jewish life, In Search of Paul reveals the work of Paul as never before, showing how and why the liberating messages and practices of equality, caring for the poor, and a just society under God's rules, not Rome's, were so appealing.

Crossan and Reed's concise, engaging prose conjures up the complex and rich world of Paul's time, from the imperial intrigues of Rome to the theological infighting among Christian communities in Greece and Turkey to the beautiful landscapes and the cultural conflicts of the Middle East. The illustrations and short, rich, "you are there" descriptions help the reader to follow in the footsteps of Paul and, indeed, in the footsteps of Christianity.

Comments (7)

Helo
I like and respect Mr. Crossand as scholar and teacher. However I am rather disappointed by this work. It is a mixture of traveler’s guide, historical account, and theological treatise. Nothing wrong with that; it’s just that I found it hard to tell where one aspect ends and the other begins. I bought the book thinking it would be a strict scientific discussion on the question of Paul’s historicity and thought. Instead it is a philosophical work on Mr. Crossand’s personal interpretation of Paul’s theology supported by select archeological and literary evidence. Having said that, I found, as long as the author stuck to archeology and literature, the narrative to be quite enjoyable. Unfortunately any line of thought or argument would always lead to some rather abstruse philosophical claim. Suffice it to say that the last chapter included quite extensive quotations from Adam Michnik, Gyorgy Konrad, and Vaclav Havel, all there in support of his personal standpoint on Paul’s thinking.
Wnex
O.K., so I loved the book, but I have to warn you that there are no images in the Kindle version and, apparently, there are in the paper version. I liked it so much that I bought The John Dominic Crossan Essential Set (4 books for the price of one) after reading it. It develops the idea of what is the true message of Paul when you take into account that half of the letters attributed to him in the New Testament were not written by him, but by later authors who wanted to tame his message of justice, equality and opposition to the Roman Empire and change it to one were the women were silent in church instead of apostles, slaves should not question their status and the Jews were to blame for Jesus' Death, not the Romans. The author takes embarks you on a literal journey where you visit place after place relevant to Paul's life, sadly without images in the Kindle version, to make his point about his vision of Paul as a revolutionary and a mystic, with justice at the center of his message, and not a mysoginist or a religious bigot.
Άνουβις
As other reviewers have noted, this isn't primarily about Paul himself. It presents a detailed picture of life in the Roman empire at the time of Paul and, for me, there was a lot of new information. I came away from the book impressed by the extent to which the message of Paul, and of Jesus, was a challenge to the accepted ideas of that culture.
LiTTLe_NiGGa_in_THE_СribE
Just now reread the book. Good to know that there are letters actually written by Paul and letters written by others in his name with their own point of view. Paul is not the woman hater as presented by the others who wanted to maintain a patriarchal society. Discover the true meaning of justice as Christ taught and not the justice the establishment would have you believe. It was true in Roman authority which Paul argued against and still true in today's one percent authority versus the 99 percent who have no voice, or rather they have their voice manipulated to agree with the one per-centers.
Milleynti
This work approaches Paul from an aspect of how he and his message fit into Roman and Jewish society, so it is also a book about cultures, rituals, philosophies, customs and archaeology. It paints him in a more radical light than I imagined. However, this is a very interesting read.
Thetalen
Before I give any positive or negative critique let me say that I would highly recommend this book to anyone who is serious student of the New Testament or to any interested in Paul and Empire.

That being said, while this book is extremely beneficial, to the extent that it paints a picture of Paul's context that is rarely seen, it hardly deals with Paul's writings in an academic manner. But for now let me stick with the good points of the book to begin.
This was an almost always invigorating and interesting read that at most points read with the ease of a novel. Often pictures are excluded from academic works for whatever reasons, however Crossan does not shy from their use, and in this particular work they prove extremely helpful in transporting the reader to the context of Paul. Perhaps even more exciting and helpful were the block quotes that littered the entire book from engravings on stone and imperial edicts, to 1st century literature. By the time you finish the book you feel as though you lived for a time alongside Paul.

If I were Crossan, and I certainly am nowhere near him, I would have limited this book to the task of painting a picture of the empire in Paul's world as was so wonderfully done. Personally I feel as though I was mislead as to what to book would produce once I began reading the few and far between exegetical discussions of Paul's letters. Though I did not count, I would be surprised if there were much more than 50 pages committed exegetical discussion. A similar amount ink was spilled putting the reader in the modern day archeological sites visited throughout the book.

From these two authors I was hoping for a more thorough and academic treatment of Paul. Instead what I got was little to no interaction with other scholars, and great assertions with little to no backing. It is not that their assertions were necessarily unfounded, but when one makes claims that change shape of Pauline theology they should certainly dedicate a good deal of pages to address the claims and certainly interact with other scholarship both in agreement and disagreement.

Again, great read and highly recommended to those seeking a better understanding of Paul and Empire. If I were teaching a class on Paul I would likely require this book if not just for the archeological pictures and block quotes alone. But as a warning to all would be readers, read Crossan and Reed but don't take their Pauline theology as gospel, they certainly didn't earn it in this work.
Lesesshe
Paul's epistles can be very difficult to understand. This book gives the proper context and explanations to make reading the epistles themselves much more enjoyable.
Like a lot of Crossan's earlier work on separating out who Jesus probably was from what the church sought to make of him, Crossan does here with the life and times of Paul. It also is very helpful in understanding the actual context in which Paul lived and wrote that helps shed light on the meaning of phrases and words Paul uses.

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