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by Virginia M. Mecklenburg,Robert W. Snyder,National Museum of American Art,Rebecca Zurier

  • ISBN: 0393039013
  • Author: Virginia M. Mecklenburg,Robert W. Snyder,National Museum of American Art,Rebecca Zurier
  • ePub ver: 1311 kb
  • Fb2 ver: 1311 kb
  • Rating: 4.7 of 5
  • Language: English
  • Pages: 232
  • Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company; 1st edition (January 17, 1996)
  • Formats: doc azw doc docx
  • Category: Art
  • Subcategory: History & Criticism
epub Metropolitan Lives: The Ashcan Artists and Their New York, 1897-1917 download

Between 1897 and 1917, six painters, none native to the city they so. .Virginia Mecklenburg is the chief curator for the National Museum of American Art in Washington, .

Between 1897 and 1917, six painters, none native to the city they so provocatively and energetically portrayed, challenged the standards for suitable artistic subject matter when they took to the streets of New York and seized on images full of motion and life. Their "prophet" was Walt Whitman, and their achievements create a vibrant record of urban growth and artistic evolution. Zurier and her coauthors, Robert Snyder and Virginia Mecklenburg, bring expertise in art, social, and cultural history to this lively volume.

This book presents more than 100 paintings, drawings, and prints by the six artists whose earthy, urban subjects led critics to call them the "Ashcan School", along with reproductions of contemporary postcards, sheet music, advertisements, newspaper clippings, and magazine illustrations that show how clearly the artists reflected the current events of their times

Metropolitan Lives book.

Metropolitan Lives book. Start by marking Metropolitan Lives: The Ashcan Artists and Their New York, 1897-1917 as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read. And in this sense New York City was the perfect subject for their art. Robert Snyder's essay "City in Transition" begins: "The greatest theater in New York has always been the theater of its streets, especially at the beginning of the twentieth century. The city that emerged was both coarse and inspiring. Tenements sprawled in the shadows of skyscrapers.

Bibliographic Details. Title: Metropolitan Lives: The Ashcan Artists and. Rebecca Zurier is assistant professor of American Art at the University of Michigan. Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company. This book presents 100 of the greatest paintings, pastels, drawings, and prints by a group of artists derogatorily dubbed the Ashcan School by the critics. George Bellows, William Glackens, Robert Henri, George Luks, Everett Shinn, and John Sloan ignored the romantic and lofty themes of many of their contemporaries and chose instead to depict the dramatic changes and conflicting social mores among the common people in turn-of-the-century New York City.

Rebecca Zurier, Robert W. Snyder, and Virginia M. Mecklenburg. Tamayo: The New York Years. The six artists whose earthy, urban subjects led critics to call them the Ashcan School are featured in this book. The authors document how closely the work of these artists reflected current events and social concerns at the turn of the century. Newspaper clippings, postcards, and other ephemera of the period are reproduced. Mexican American artist Rufino Tamayo (1899-1991) is best known for his boldly-colored, semi-abstract paintings.

at New York’s Museum of Modern Ar. Metropolitan Lives: The Ashcan Artists and Their New York.

at New York’s Museum of Modern Art. Although the Ashcan artists were not an organized school and espoused somewhat varied styles and subjects, they were all urban Realists who supported Henri’s credo- art for life’s sake, rather than art for art’s sake. The Ashcan artists selectively documented an unsettling, transitional time in American culture that was marked by confidence and doubt, excitement and trepidation.

New York and London: The National Museum of American Art, in association with . Norton & Company, 1995. Peter Borsay (a1), Elizabeth Musgrave (a2) and Sue Wragg (a3). Dept of History, University College of Wales Lampeter, Ceredigion, SA48 7ED. (a2). Dept of History, Nene College, Northampton, NN2 7AL. (a3). Nene College, Northampton.

Director, American Studies. Snyder has worked widely with museums. With Rebecca Zurier, he was co-curator of the exhibit Metropolitan Lives: The Ashcan Artists and their New York at the National Museum of American Art at the Smithsonian Institution. He served as a consultant to the Museum of the City of New York for exhibits on the Spanish Civil War and New York City, the mayoralty of John V. Lindsay, and the cartoons of Denys Wortman. With the Newark Museum, he has developed educational programs for teachers and the general public.

The Ashcan artists documented the city and its people in an almost journalistic fashion, exploring the .

The Ashcan artists documented the city and its people in an almost journalistic fashion, exploring the same subjects occupying the press: immigration, the lower-middle class, and gender issues. They portrayed life at the street level, gravitating to bars, street corners, boxing clubs, beaches, parks, restaurants, movie theaters, and neighborhood meeting places. In retrospect, it is difficult to imagine the American tradition in painting without these wonderful and moving works.

100 greatest works by Bellows, Sloan, and the other painters of the Ashcan School.

This book presents 100 of the greatest paintings, pastels, drawings, and prints by a group of artists derogatorily dubbed the Ashcan School by the critics. George Bellows, William Glackens, Robert Henri, George Luks, Everett Shinn, and John Sloan ignored the romantic and lofty themes of many of their contemporaries and chose instead to depict the dramatic changes and conflicting social mores among the common people in turn-of-the-century New York City. The Ashcan artists documented the city and its people in an almost journalistic fashion, exploring the same subjects occupying the press: immigration, the lower-middle class, and gender issues. They portrayed life at the street level, gravitating to bars, street corners, boxing clubs, beaches, parks, restaurants, movie theaters, and neighborhood meeting places. In retrospect, it is difficult to imagine the American tradition in painting without these wonderful and moving works. 110 full-color and 100 black-and-white illustrations
Comments (3)

ChallengeMine
When Bill Gates bought a George Bellows oil for twenty-seven-and-a-half million dollars in November of 1999, the national media at last took notice of what may be the most important genre of American art - the Ashcan period of the early 1900's. This wonderful book captures the lives, times, and works of the six artists who brought the streets of turn-of-the-century New York City to thrilling life. Bellows, Sloan, Henri, Glackens, Luks, and Shinn shared a collective talent and daring unseen before or since in the United States, and the book presents their best works in gorgeous color. It also delves into both the men's and the city's history to place the art in context.
Alfred Lord Tennyson once praised Rudyard Kipling for his 'divine fire.' Of the six artists here, Bellows, Sloan, and Henri clearly possessed that fire.
Bellows's unflinching depiction of New York's seedy side reveals a city simultaneously frightening, comical, and beautiful. Sloan's more affectionate touch finds warm delight in the common and mundane. The vitality of Henri's portraits is nothing short of remarkable.
If you buy this book for nothing else, buy it for Sloan. Beautiful, accessible, challenging paintings. And you won't find yourself in a competition with Bill Gates. =)
INvait
nice, well-done and of course, a bit too small. I don't think anything but a giant book could do justice...
Gandree
A pleasure to read. Informative as well. This is part of the story of Robert Henri and five of the artists associated with him in art history as the AshCan approach: Sloan, Luks, Shinn, Glackens and the somewhat younger, George Bellows, perhaps the best remembered of the group.They were not, like the contemporary Cubists or German Expressionists, innovators in style and technique; rather it was to the subject matter with which they devoted much of their efforts, that give them a significant place in American art history. Their unofficial spokesman and leader, Henri, preached in words and deed that it was in the life of real people and urban settings, that one could find the New America. It was in seeing these elements as they were, not through romanticizing lenses, that art of a modern democracy could serve a useful purpose. Among the forces that led to this new approach was the apprenticeship and continuing publication in journalism and illustration (save for Henri) that kept their feet firmly on the urban ground.
The essays in this book provide a fine introduction to the interaction of conditions in New York City and the art that they produced. We are shown in detail, also, the limitations their background and financial demands upon them, imposed on the reality of their pictures. They were not, as no good artist ever is, simply recipient of impact from their surroundings, their middle class American status, allowed them to see and understand some things and not others. I found the essays quite good at making this point as well as exploring the nature of what they did and how their own proclivities led them to these sources and their presentation of them. One is given both a lesson on how the NYC of the early decades of the 20th Century (and the late 19th) influenced their art and how their interests and marketing needs influenced the image of the City that one saw in the media for whom they worked and the marketplace for independent art objects which they sought to develop.
The book is lavishly illustrated with three types of pictures, color reproductions of paintings, non-color reproductions of etchings and drawings originally without color, and black and white reproductions of paintings. Many of the illustrations are given their own textual amplification independent of the general text. The authors all write in a manner easily understood by the common reader.
All in all, I commend this book to the general reader, not only to those drawn to art history, but also to those with an interest in developing subcultures and urban development. The professional not specializing to this area of study will also find matters of interest.
One point that is simply mentioned in a concluding statement in the last essay should be stressed. While American art histories emphasize the fact that European cubism, surrealism, expressionism and American abstract expressionism, and other movements have tended to overshadow the developments led by these men, the realistic exploration of urban (and, increasingly suburban and interurban) phenomena, of people within their life-settings, has never been repressed in American Art. The tradition has always retained its commitment and has continued to provide the art-viewer with vital insights.

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