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epub Cinder Edna download

by Ellen Jackson,Kevin O'Malley

  • ISBN: 0688123228
  • Author: Ellen Jackson,Kevin O'Malley
  • ePub ver: 1598 kb
  • Fb2 ver: 1598 kb
  • Rating: 4.8 of 5
  • Language: English
  • Pages: 32
  • Publisher: HarperCollins; 1st edition (April 29, 1994)
  • Formats: docx mbr lrf lit
  • Category: Kids
  • Subcategory: Growing Up & Facts of Life
epub Cinder Edna download

O'Malley's ( Bruno, You're Late for School! ) nicely executed, cleverly detailed spreads contrast Cinderella's fantasy glow with Edna's clear-eyed, can-do attitude.

Only 19 left in stock (more on the way). O'Malley's ( Bruno, You're Late for School! ) nicely executed, cleverly detailed spreads contrast Cinderella's fantasy glow with Edna's clear-eyed, can-do attitude. This Cinderella send-up is full of kid-pleasing jokes and, besides, it's never too early to discover the hazards of codependence.

Ellen Jackson and Kevin O'Malley team up to bring young readers the delightful story of what can be done .

Ellen Jackson and Kevin O'Malley team up to bring young readers the delightful story of what can be done without the help of a fairy godmother. Lothrop, Lee & Shepard Books New York. For Megan Schlueter EJ. For my sister, Maureen . No part of this book may be reproduced or utilized in any form or by any.

O'Malley's satirical characterizations and lively compositions are right in the spirit of the entertaining story. Poor Cinderella ends up bored with her handsome but vacuous prince while Edna and Rupert enjoy a modest but productive life, & ever after. O'Malley's satirical characterizations and lively compositions are right in the spirit of the entertaining story.

Written by Ellen Jackson and illustrated by Kevin O'Malley.

Cinderella and Cinder Edna, who live with cruel stepmothers and stepsisters, have different approaches to life; and, although each ends up with the prince of her dreams, one is a great deal happier than the others. Written by Ellen Jackson and illustrated by Kevin O'Malley. Published by HarperCollins. She lives with her husband and dog in Santa Barbara, California.

In Cinder Edna, Ellen Jackson and Kevin O'Malley team up to bring young readers the delightful story of what can be donewithoutthe help of a fairy godmother. Once upon a time there were two girls who lived next door to each other. Cinder Edna Exuberant and funny-kids will love this version of the familiar story for its humor and vibrant artwork. School Library Journal.

In Cinder Edna, Ellen Jackson and Kevin O'Malley team up to bring young readers the delightful story of what can be done without the help of a fairy godmother. Cinder Edna was forced to work for her wicked stepmother and stepsisters, just as her neighbor, Cinderella, was. Edna, on the other hand, had learned a thing or two from doing all that housework, such as how to make tuna casserole sixteen different ways and how to get spots off everything from rugs to ladybugs.

School Library Journal In Cinder Edna, Ellen Jackson and Kevin O'Malley team up to bring young readers the delightful story of what can be done without the help of a fairy godmother.

by. Jackson, Ellen, 1943-; O'Malley, Kevin, 1961- illustrator. A Mulberry paperback book. Cinderella and Cinder Edna, who live with cruel stepmothers and stepsisters, have different approaches to life; and, although each ends up with the prince of her dreams, one is a great deal happier than the other. no page number in the book. Published on April 29, 1994 by HarperCollins. ISBN-13: 9780688123222.

11. Cinder Edna and Rupert have decided to write a book together

10. Kevin O’Malley has used the illustrations to show us more about Cinderella, Cinder Edna, Randolph, and Rupert. Look at the picture that shows the marriage ceremony. 11. Cinder Edna and Rupert have decided to write a book together. How do we know this? Answer: You'll find a picture of the book they wrote together on the front flap of the book jacket. 12. Are stepmothers always wicked? Do you know any nice stepmothers?

“Exuberant and funny—kids will love this version of the familiar story for its humor and vibrant artwork.” —School Library Journal

In Cinder Edna, Ellen Jackson and Kevin O'Malley team up to bring young readers the delightful story of what can be done without the help of a fairy godmother.

Once upon a time there were two girls who lived next door to each other. Cinder Edna was forced to work for her wicked stepmother and stepsisters, just as her neighbor, Cinderella, was.

Edna, on the other hand, had learned a thing or two from doing all that housework, such as how to make tuna casserole sixteen different ways and how to get spots off everything from rugs to ladybugs. And she was strong and spunky and knew some good jokes.

Then one day the king announced that he would give a ball ...

Comments (7)

Very Old Chap
I enjoyed this book. It was well written and the illustrations are well done. But I don't read it to my daughter because I found the underlying message extremely problematic.
In it we meet Cinderella and Cinder Edna, who are juxtaposed against each other. Cinder Edna is plain, smart, funny, determined, and upbeat, a real "pull herself up by her bootstraps" kind of girl. Cinderella is pretty, one dimensional, helpless, and vapid. Both are worked hard by their wicked stepmother and sisters, but where Cinderella sits and feels sorry for herself, Cinder Edna makes the most of a bad situation and learns skills from her drudgery. Both want to attend the ball. Cinderella is helpless and needs a fairy godmother to come up with her attire and transportation, and when she arrives at the ball she relies on her good looks, which is the only thing her doltish and vain prince notices about her. Cinder Edna, who is practical and independent, has a dress on layaway and takes the bus. At the ball she meets a male version of herself who is nerdy and interesting. Long story short, only one lives happily ever after.
In attempting to subvert the usual message we see in princess stories that "beauty=good" when it comes to women, the author has inadvertently reinforced another stereotype that's nearly as damaging: "beauty=dumb bimbo." In other words, women who conform to feminine gender expression must be shallow and idiotic, and funny girls are conversely plain.
I was also distressed by the negative portrait painted of Cinderella's reaction to her abusive family -- essentially she just sat around in cinders feeling sorry for herself, whereas Cinder Edna smiled through it and found ways to better herself. On the surface this may seem like a good lesson, until you consider that this reinforces a "blame the victim" mentality In this world view, victims of familial abuse should just suck it up and smile through it, and if they experience depression or a sense of helplessness or need help getting their lives together (from a fairy godmother, perhaps), then that's simply because they are weak and pouty, like this Cinderella. This could have been easily remedied had they depicted Edna's own struggle with these issues. The book was already wordy as it was, it could have stood a few more sentences for the sake of making that point.
All in all, I think the beauty standards and gender roles this book tries to undo are almost completely undermined by the fact that it trips over itself backward into the mirror opposite trap.
Tenius
this is a wonderful expansion on the Cinderella story that encourages readers to make the best of life instead of accepting the romantic/victim role. a great addition to my young nieces library. unfortunately the book was listed as like new, but came to me well worn.
Cordabor
My daughter (almost 4 years old) does not quite get the story yet so I would suggest this for slightly older children who can think/talk through the intended message a little more.

Though this story is much better and more thought provoking than the original, the message is still a little much like a traditional fairy tale for me. Cinderella is still helpless and effortlessly made over by a fairy godmother who provides the slippers, fancy dress and all (which is unintentionally charming to my daughter) and Cinder Edna is pretty average. The real kicker is that the author makes of point of mentioning that Cinderella is beautiful and Edna is less than pretty. Isn't that still reinforcing modern, western beauty standards? Isn't that still reinforcing the importance of physical beauty period? Isn't that still saying that if you do nothing and feel sorry for yourself you might just be blessed by a fairy godmother? That was not quite the message I was hoping for.

Also, in the end both girls still are "rescued" by the princes. Ultimately Cinderella is bored with her vain prince and Cinder Edna is happy with her down-to-earth prince with whom she tells jokes and shares common interests but there is still a "thank god I'm rescued/happily ever after" feeling to the end.

Don't get me wrong; Cinder Edna is awesome. She is smart, resourceful, hard-working and fun and Cinderella ends up miserable and bored. However, I think the message falls a bit short of on-target.

Much better than the original and worth adding to your bookshelf if your child is emotionally and cognitively ready and able to talk through the meaning.
Vut
Girls need new myths in our times......in this case the princess is bested by a reall go getter tough and pragmatic Edna. This is so funny and beautiful full page illustrations
Saberdragon
Cinder Edna is the story for the girls who don't need a fairy godmother, find prince charming arrogant, and think glass slippers are a really stupid idea. This book is for the girls who make their own happy ending and aren't waiting to be rescued from victimhood. Enda is wise and funny and knows how to have a good time. She is a preferable role model to Disney princesses or the Twilight weenie. I also appreciate that while Edna takes herself to the ball she doesn't take herself too seriously or belittle the other princesses. Cinder Edna is well written with great illustrations. I think most families with girls will appreciate this twist on the Cinderella tale.
Gholbirius
We do a unit on Cinderella stories from around the world. This is one of the books I use. I read it to my second grade class and both the boys and the girls really enjoyed it. They liked the idea of the side by side stories of the two girls, and two boys, and how the "Cinders" solved their problems. I made a unit and we did character maps, story maps, and venn diagrams with it. The entire class had a good time and they learned a lot and met many of the state standards, and really understood the skills because we used a story they liked. I highly recommend this book because one of the girls is modern, and the other is more of the classical verison. It worked well in the classroom and I think a child ages 5-6 would like it read to them, 7 and older should be able to read most of it, with some assistance.

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