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epub Snapshots from the Wedding download

by Gary Soto

  • ISBN: 039922808X
  • Author: Gary Soto
  • ePub ver: 1441 kb
  • Fb2 ver: 1441 kb
  • Rating: 4.5 of 5
  • Language: English
  • Pages: 32
  • Publisher: Putnam Juvenile; First Edition edition (March 17, 1997)
  • Formats: rtf docx lrf mbr
  • Category: Kids
  • Subcategory: Geography & Cultures
epub Snapshots from the Wedding download

Snapshots from the Wedding by Gary Soto.

Snapshots from the Wedding by Gary Soto. Новые русские бабки - Лучшее.

Gary Soto was born April 12, 1952, and raised in Fresno California. Soto is the author of ten poetry collections for adults, with New and Selected Poems a 1995 finalist for both the Los Angeles Times Book Award and the National Book Award

Gary Soto was born April 12, 1952, and raised in Fresno California. He graduated from Roosevelt High School and attended Fresno City College, graduating in 1974 with an English degree. Soto is the author of ten poetry collections for adults, with New and Selected Poems a 1995 finalist for both the Los Angeles Times Book Award and the National Book Award. His recollections Living Up the Street received a Before Columbus Foundation 1985 American Book Award.

Snapshots From A Wedding by Gary Soto is a very unique children’s book on a Mexican family wedding. The book uses very realistic snapshots on each page and even incorporates three-dimensional artwork. Gary Soto does a wonderful job in introducing a unique cultural experience to his readers. As an educator, this book could be used for a variety of things in the classroom. First, it introduces diversity and a new cultural experience for the students. Teachers can use this book to bring up the top Snapshots From A Wedding by Gary Soto is a very unique children’s book on a Mexican family wedding.

Snapshots from the Wedding is a lightly humorous story told through the eyes of a young girl named Maya. By casting Maya in the role of narrator, Soto allows the reader the same view of the festivities as a member of the wedding party.

Gary Soto, Stephanie Garcia. Maya, the flower girl, is the lens through which the action is seen. The choice of three dimensional artwork was inspired".

Gary Soto’s picture book . Imitate Gary Soto’s character, and make it entertaining! A celebration: take a holiday and write an informational text about what various characters are doing on that day to celebrate or not celebrate.

Gary Soto’s picture book, Snapshots from the Wedding is an excellent example of a book that shows cultural variety. Create an alphabet book or a counting book about items from a household or a community. Other Writing Strategies What if?

From Soto (Off and Running, 1996, et., a celebratory, child's-eye look at a wedding that captures the traditional mingling of the surreal . While the family is Mexican-American, the wedding's touching and silly moments are universal.

From Soto (Off and Running, 1996, et., a celebratory, child's-eye look at a wedding that captures the traditional mingling of the surreal and the sublime. A flower girl, Maya, tells in a pitch-perfect accent about the groom, Rafael, who is at the altar with his arm in a cast (he slid into home playing softball and scored, but broke his wrist), and a host of other relatives and strangers. Garcia's illustrations, photographs of Sculpy clay figures and collage, are pink and white and delicious, reminiscent of both reredos and scenes from a dollhouse.

By Gary Soto Illustrated by Stephanie Garcia. Snapshots from the Wedding captures the unique moments of a special occasion–the big scenes as well as the little ones–that together form a rich family mosaic. By Gary Soto Illustrated by Stephanie Garcia. Category: Children’s Picture Books. Dec 28, 1998 ISBN 9780698117525 4-8 years. See all books by Gary Soto. Born in Fresno, California, to Mexican American parents, Gary Soto is an acclaimed poet, essayist, and fiction writer.

Snapshots from the Wedding is a book by Gary Soto. Soto creates a little girl that tells us all about a wedding she attended. The illustrations are collages that are supposed to represent snapshots of the wedding. It is as if we are in her mind, as she is retelling her story. The story is told by Maya, who is a flower girl in a wedding. Through the words and graphics you are able to experience the wedding. She uses "spanglish" throughout the story.

Maya attends a family wedding and captures it all on film, from her cousin getting rice in his eye to the cake that tasted as delicious as it looked, in a beautifully illustrated tale of a special family day.
Comments (7)

digytal soul
Snapshots from the Wedding is a lightly humorous story told through the eyes of a young girl named Maya. Gary Soto delivers this joyous narrative of a traditional Mexican boda in lyrical and rhythmic language.

By casting Maya in the role of narrator, Soto allows the reader the same view of the festivities as a member of the wedding party. From her position, Maya observes and comments on the assembled guests, the bridal procession, the photographer at work, and the moment when the couple exchanges vows at the altar. Afterward, at the reception, Maya revels in the mariachi band, the pinning of paper money to the bride’s skirt, and the couple’s departure beneath a shower of rice. As her gaze travels across each scene, she stops to focus on details ranging from the ring bearer’s slicked-back hair, to a boy whose tongue wiggles through the space left by newly lost baby teeth, and to the eye-popping spectacle of a towering wedding cake.

In Soto’s words, “Here’s the wedding cake, seventh wonder of the world, from Blanco’s Bakery, with more frosting than a mountain of snow, with more roses than mi abuela’s back yard, with more swirls than a hundred turns on a merry-go-round.”

Stephanie Garcia, the Pura Belpré-winning illustrator, depicts Maya’s wide-eyed experience of the wedding as something remembered through a series of winsome snapshots. Yet, in one of the most surprising and original aspects of this book, Garcia brings the scenes into sharp relief through exquisitely constructed dioramas that defy all expectations for a story conceived around the idea of photographs.

Each of the three-dimensional illustrations is a miniature stage that sits within a shallow wooden box. The overall effect is that of a dollhouse whose rooms brim with texture and engaging detail, and which cry out to be touched and played with, in order to fully appreciate the tactile gifts they offer. Using a wide range of materials that includes fabric, clay, paint, and found objects, Garcia populates her scenes with individually rendered characters, furnishings, and backdrops. Fashioned from Sculpy clay, each human figure bears distinct facial features and expressions. The skin tones come in varied shades of brown, and each is dressed in clothing suitable for that person’s role in the wedding.

By leaving the diorama’s rough wooden edges in full view and by dressing some of the wedding guests in homespun fabrics, the book hints at the deeper, economic realities of life in a working-class Mexican community. Yet, the momentous social importance of weddings often leads families to go all out for the occasion, evidenced here by the elaborate costumes of the mariachi band and the satin-and-lace gowns of the bridal party.

In nearly every spread, Garcia employs a clever frame-within-a-frame concept that plays with the passage of time. In these instances, select characters appear inside a gilt-edged frame, like mannequins propped in a store window, even as the activity of the moment continues to swirl around them. This approach suggests a future glimpse of the photos being taken. Appropriately, the photographer himself appears in one of the dioramas, snapping his shutter just as the bride and groom are about to kiss.

Garcia’s attention to individual characters complements Soto’s depictions. In one of my favorite vignettes, little Maya and another young lady try their best to snare the bouquet as the bride tosses it. But the bouquet is “caught by the tallest woman there, my cousin Virginia, a college basketball player, with a three-foot vertical leap.” Garcia gives Virginia a mint-green bridesmaid’s dress, with low-heel pumps dyed to match, and a long reach that ensures her effortless catch. We can easily imagine Virginia in a basketball uniform, putting her vertical leap to good use in a different context.

With such singular moments, Soto and Garcia illuminate a range of experiences not often captured in portrayals of Mexican culture. Through its engaging text and rich dioramas, this picture book offers charming views of an important social occasion as seen through the delighted eyes of a little girl who feels at home within this community. And this wedding is an occasion she’ll remember for years to come through its album of snapshots.
Billy Granson
So, let's divide this book into two parts. Pictures and words. The words? Great. A wonderful little summary of what a wedding is all about, combined with little details about the family which really make the story pop out. It isn't JUST some explanation of the process of a wedding, but the real-life remembrances of this young girl. For the words themselves, I'd give the story five stars.

BUT THE PICTURES FREAK ME OUT SO BAD. The Uncanny Valley is when you have a human figure that's off just enough to make you unnerved at how unnatural it is. This isn't the Uncanny Valley, it's the Uncanny Marianas Trench. The wedding is done in sculpy clay, which would be cute if LESS detail was put on the humans, but it really looks like the artist was trying to get really true-to-life, but didn't have the necessary level of sculpting skill to either a) actually make it true to life or b) recognize their limitations and be more stylistic than realistic.

Perhaps most kids won't care. But me? I do not want this book in my house, I'm just not okay with those pictures.
Yayrel
Flower girl Maya tells the story of her cousin's wedding in vivid detail. She shares her often silly, but always observant tale of the event from a child's point of view. From the groom's broken arm to crying babies, she leaves little to the imagination.
Stephanie Garcia, illustrator of this 1998 Pura Belpre Award winner, uses a unique but effective approach by using photographs of three-dimensional picture boxes to convey the story. The boxes contain realistic clay figures and a collage of items from the wedding. The text and pictures are integrally tied, and the text often cleverly prompts the reader to look at something in the illustration.
This is such a fun book that it needs to be read several times to properly enjoy it. The writer is definitely in tune with a child's point of view.
Winawel
The book is an overall good portrait of a family celebration in any culture. The casual reference to beer and keg beer,however, are not acceptable for this age group. When we teach our children (in the drug awareness programs in schools) that alcohol is a drug and is bad, the message we send needs to be consistent. My daughter chose this book off of the shelf at the school library during the same week that they were promoting drug-free schools and really had trouble understanding why the people at the wedding would want to do "something bad for you". She will have plenty of time, in the years to come, to learn more about alcohol and all that it involves. She doesn't need the unsupervised exposure to it at this age.
Watikalate
This book took me on a journey into a Mexican Wedding. Maya, the flower girl walks you through her family's wedding and the interesting things that went on that that day through her point of view. The illustrations by Stephanie Garcia are given in a clay form; I personally didn't care for them. The book has some Spanish words but you don't have to worry if you can't read it because Gary Soto did an awesome job of having their definitions in the front of the book. This is a good book to read during Hispanic Heritage month to learn Spanish words and little about the Mexican culture as well. It does make a reference to beer that did catch me off guard. I personally don't believe the reference of beer needed to be included in the book but, that is my opinion. Overall, it's an OK book that won the Pura Belpré which is an award given for books that represent Latino traditions and cultures in a positive way.
Jothris
A feel-good read for those who like weddings

This story takes the reader into the wedding as it happens. It can trigger memories that the reader may have from weddings that they have attended. Maya, the narrator and main character of the story, tells the story in a way so that the reader can easily visualize what she is describing.

Great illustrations that have a real-life feel to them. True Mexican traditional wedding.

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