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epub Exploring Expect: A Tcl-based Toolkit for Automating Interactive Programs (Nutshell Handbooks) download

by Don Libes

  • ISBN: 1565920902
  • Author: Don Libes
  • ePub ver: 1547 kb
  • Fb2 ver: 1547 kb
  • Rating: 4.1 of 5
  • Language: English
  • Pages: 606
  • Publisher: O'Reilly Media; 1st edition (December 11, 1994)
  • Formats: rtf lrf lit mobi
  • Category: IT
  • Subcategory: Programming
epub Exploring Expect: A Tcl-based Toolkit for Automating Interactive Programs (Nutshell Handbooks) download

The coverage of tcl upon which expect is based is very good - better in a lot of ways than actual tcl/tk books.

Don Libes is married to Susan Mulroney, a professor in the Department of Physiology and Biophysics at the Georgetown University School of Medicine. The coverage of tcl upon which expect is based is very good - better in a lot of ways than actual tcl/tk books.

Don Libes is the creator of Expect as well as the author of this book

Don Libes is the creator of Expect as well as the author of this book. In Exploring Expect, he provides a comprehensive tutorial on all of Expect's features, allowing you to put it immediately to work on your problems. In a down-to-earth and humorous style, he provides numerous examples of challenging real-world applications and how they can be automated using Expect to save you time and money.

Expect is quickly becoming a part of every UNIX users toolbox. Using Expect to automate these applications will allow you to speed up tasks and, in many cases, solve new problems that you never would have even considered before. For example, you can use Expect to test interactive programs with no changes to their interfaces. Or wrap interactive programs with Motif-like front-ends to control applications by buttons, scrollbars, and other graphic elements.

Expect is quickly becoming a part of every UNIX user's toolbox. Expect is quickly becoming a part of every UNIX user's toolbox.

In Exploring Expect, he provides a comprehensive tutorial on all of Expect's features, allowing . This book provides an introduction to Tcl and describes how Expect applies Tcl's power to the new field of interaction automation.

In Exploring Expect, he provides a comprehensive tutorial on all of Expect's features, allowing you to put it immediately to work on your problems.

Exploring Expect (Nutshell Handbooks). Exploring Expect: A Tcl-based Toolkit for Automating Interactive Programs. 6 Mb. 9 Mb.

Items related to Exploring Expect: A Tcl-based Toolkit for Automating. Don Libes is married to Susan Mulroney, a professor in the Department of Physiology and Biophysics at the Georgetown University School of Medicine

Items related to Exploring Expect: A Tcl-based Toolkit for Automating. Libes, Don Exploring Expect: A Tcl-based Toolkit for Automating Interactive Programs (Nutshell Handbooks). ISBN 13: 9781565920903. Exploring Expect: A Tcl-based Toolkit for Automating Interactive Programs (Nutshell Handbooks). Don Libes is married to Susan Mulroney, a professor in the Department of Physiology and Biophysics at the Georgetown University School of Medicine. Their well-hydrated daughter, Kenna, has two lovely kidneys.

Exploring Expect A Tcl-Based Toolkit for Automating Interactive Programs (Nutshell Handbook) by Don Libes. When I discovered Perl I though it's a quick and dirty way to automate admin tasks. The really quick and dirty way is Expect. Paperback: 599 pages ; Dimensions (in inches): . 9 x . 5 x . 0. Publisher: O'Reilly & Associates; (December 1994). com Sales Rank: 45,603.

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Comments (7)

Laizel
Don Libes's book put me in a bad mood, so I will be tough on him and only give 2 stars, although I debate with myself whether 2 or 3 is appropriate. In any case, I look at the current average of the reviews and I see 4 stars, and I think that is too generous. I do not want to base my review on the fact that the book made me sleepy, because that may be more a statement about me than the book. My beef is the author's inability to be a great pedagogue. He has hidden some fundamental information in a later part of the book that would appear at first to be for advanced users. And he has written that section with the lack of clarity that other reviewers have complained about. "Sending Without Echoing" is in Chapter 12 "Send," on page 273.

The general problem occurs when a send command is followed by an expect command. The normal echoing of the command sent will be processed by the expect command. This is not an issue in the simplest of examples, and the simplest of examples is all that one finds in the first 160 pages of the book. I ran into an issue when I had send followed by expect and my expect pattern was a regular expression. I contend that this problem should be highlighted BOLDLY at least by the end of the chapter on Regular Expressions. And probably in the preceding chapter on Glob Patterns. But again, the few examples of send followed by expect in the RE chapter do not highlight my issue.

Typically, an index, and I have not gotten much pleasure from the index in this book, is not a solution for this because one would not know what to search for when the problem strikes. Only having basic information in the basic part of the book is a solution. The author simply was not born to be a great teacher, despite his otherwise formidable credentials.
Vutaur
I've been using this book for over 13 years, and it's still current, still very useful. My only issue is that the author needs to port it to more languages. I'd love to see a Don Libes version of Expect not only for TCL, but for Ruby, Python, and even the new Go (from google).

THe best thing about expect is that instead of just firing off commands via shell script, it can interact with those commands. For example if you write a script that uses SSH, SSH can give you multiple different responses asking for passphrase, password, accept public key from server. Expect can work like a switch statement to handle all of these:

expect {
-re "[P|p]assword" {
send "$passwdr"
exp_continue
}
"Are you sure you want to continue connecting" {
send "yesr"
}
-re "[P|p]assphrase" {
send "$passphraser"
exp_continue
-re $prompt
}

Very simple.
Opilar
I picked up Exploring Expect: A Tcl-based Toolkit for Automating Interactive Programs (Nutshell Handbooks) to get started on a regression-testing framework for common Unix programs. I was also very curious to see how Tcl was used to make this tool.

To those ends, I wasn't disappointed. Expect makes it possible to automate tedious interactive work at the interface level. One can write concise, if not elegant, scripts. The cost of brevity, as if often the case with tools of this sort, is directly proportional to one's ignorance of expect's features and how they are implemented. And, if you'd like to approach Tcl by way of example, expect is as good a choice as I've come across.

This guide, on the other hand, is often a discouraging chore to read. It's as if a shoebox of index cards, each detailing one specific feature, was sorted through and applied to flesh out the book's outline. Taken individually, these elements do make sense, providing sometimes useful examples, sometimes curious tangents, sometimes tedious cautionary tales of edge cases. Taken as a whole, it's difficult to see the forest for the trees in this guide. One could say this book is good reference material; it is indexed well, and the outline is clear enough. If it had a reference style, I could see that point.

The book however has an expository form. It employs inline cross-references and footnotes where a sidebar or a simple table would have been a welcome relief from flipping back and forth. These research-style choices enforce the idea that the book was assembled from notes, and never quite realized as a whole guide. As a result, it's closer in feel to a set of anecdotes than a reference guide. It is a style that, as an instructor, I find often discourages users, primarily beginners or others who do not have a formal technical education.

Expect is of course a valuable tool. I'm grateful to the author for making it and sharing it. I'm also surprised, however, that in the last 15 years no one has thought they could do a better job in explaining, and therefore promoting, such a useful application.
Kigul
This book, along with Ousterhout and Sun's references on the www, comprise the triolgy that is jump-starting my learning tcl. I find the index compete and easy to use and I frequently jump all around the book gleaning little nuggets of information. I am also concurrently reading it cover-to-cover because I like Libes's style -- the way he throws in his programming phylosophy with his examples so you can see why he's doing something a certain way.
I like how the author addresses issues of portability without obsessing on it.
I really like the Exercises at the end of each chapter. I only wish the author would apply a difficulty rating to each exercise because sometimes I can't tell if an exercise is intrinsically very difficult (some are definitely so) or if I need to review parts of the chapter to see why I can't just instantly 'get it.' In any event, the exercises are stimulating and would require a long time and careful thought to do them all. I would buy a book that had the answers, with commentary, to all the exercises.

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