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epub GUI Bloopers: Don'ts and Do's for Software Developers and Web Designers (Interactive Technologies) download

by Jeff Johnson

  • ISBN: 1558605827
  • Author: Jeff Johnson
  • ePub ver: 1364 kb
  • Fb2 ver: 1364 kb
  • Rating: 4.1 of 5
  • Language: English
  • Pages: 576
  • Publisher: Morgan Kaufmann; 1 edition (March 31, 2000)
  • Formats: mobi lit lrf mbr
  • Category: IT
  • Subcategory: Programming
epub GUI Bloopers: Don'ts and Do's for Software Developers and Web Designers (Interactive Technologies) download

In GUI Bloopers, consultant Jeff Johnson uses 550+ pages to illustrate common pitfalls in user interface .

In GUI Bloopers, consultant Jeff Johnson uses 550+ pages to illustrate common pitfalls in user interface design, the all-important iceberg tip that end users confuse with applications and that developers confuse with end users. Reporting on 82 incidents of bad design, Johnson manages to cover the essential point of his message: software designers should think of their user interfaces from the user's point of view. So why do we find so many bloopers in shipped software? Follow Jeff Johnson as he leads the blooper patrol deep into enemy territory: he takes no prisoners but reveals all the design stupidities that users have been cursing over the years.

In GUI Bloopers, consultant Jeff Johnson uses 550+ pages to illustrate common pitfalls in user interface design, the . Not profound, but profoundly overlooked in most low-end to mid-range development efforts.

So why do we find so many bloopers in shipped software? Follow Jeff Johnson as he leads the blooper patrol .

So why do we find so many bloopers in shipped software? Follow Jeff Johnson as he leads the blooper patrol deep into enemy territory: he takes no prisoners but reveals all the design stupidities that users have been cursing over the years. Jakob Nielsen Usability Guru, Nielsen Norman Group. If you are a software developer, read this book, especially if you don't think you need it. Don't worry, it isn't filled with abstract and useless theory-this is a book for doers, code writers, and those in the front trenches.

Software programmers and web site designers can easily lose sight of exactly how a person will interface with . With no guidance or feedback from the user, bloopers are bound to abound

Software programmers and web site designers can easily lose sight of exactly how a person will interface with their design. With no guidance or feedback from the user, bloopers are bound to abound. Author Jeff Johnson, who is a specialist in human-computer interaction, discusses mistakes that software programmers are likely to make in layout, text, interaction, responsiveness, management and more. His overall approach of designing from the outside in turns the programmer's focus to the end user. Loads of examples, both good and bad, are included.

Items related to GUI Bloopers: Don'ts and Do's for Software. Johnson, Jeff GUI Bloopers: Don'ts and Do's for Software Developers and Web Designers (Interactive Technologies). ISBN 13: 9781558605824. In GUI Bloopers, consultant Jeff Johnson uses 550+ pages to illustrate common pitfalls in user interface design, the all-important iceberg tip that end users confuse with applications and that developers confuse with end users.

It does not. The introduction states explicitly that the book is not intending to discuss either UI examples that are the most . The introduction states explicitly that the book is not intending to discuss either UI examples that are the most flagrantly hilarious, or examples that are the worst. Rather, the book critiques UI examples that are some of the most common. The examples are good, and described in depth, with specific reasons given for their classification as mistakes. He has categorized the problems in broad topics such as "GUI Component Bloopers" and "Interaction Bloopers", then gives concrete examples of the bloopers that occur within each broad topic.

GUI Bloopers looks at user interface design bloopers from commercial .

GUI Bloopers looks at user interface design bloopers from commercial software, Web sites, and information appliances, explaining how intelligent, well-intentioned professionals made these dreadful mistakes-and how you can avoid them.

Is your application or Web site ready for prime time? A major revision of a classic reference, GUI Bloopers . looks at user interface design bloopers from commercial software, Web sites, Web applications, and information appliances, explaining how intelligent, well-intentioned professionals make these mistakes-and how you can avoid them

If you are a designer who has to explain to developers what they are doing wrong, get this book (or .

I loved this book for how well it explained every bad interface design blooper I had ever seen at that point & helped me understand why developers created many of these problems. It helped me explain to developers why there were better solutions & how to design them. It also contains an excellent introduction to user-centered design

Creating GUI applications with Matlab.

Creating GUI applications with Matlab. Продолжительность: 8:14 BAIJU MAX Recommended for you. 8:14. Photogrammetry vs. "Real" 3D Scanner - Продолжительность: 17:55 Thomas Sanladerer Recommended for you. 17:55. Основы Программирования - - Логика. Алгоритмы - Продолжительность: 15:29 loftblog Recommended for you.

GUI Bloopers looks at user interface design bloopers from commercial software, Web sites, and information appliances, explaining how intelligent, well-intentioned professionals made these dreadful mistakes--and how you can avoid them. While equipping you with all the theory needed to learn from these examples, GUI expert Jeff Johnson also presents the reality of interface design in an entertaining, anecdotal, and instructive way.

This is an excellent, well-illustrated resource for anyone whose work touches on usability issues, including software engineers, Web site designers, managers of development processes, QA professionals, and usability professionals.Hear Jeff Johnson's interview podcast on software and website usability at the University of Canterbury (25 min.) * Takes a learn-by-example approach that teaches you to avoid common errors by asking the appropriate questions of your own interface designs.* Includes two complete war stories, drawn from the author's personal experience, that describe in detail the challenges faced by UI engineers.* Covers bloopers in a wide range of categories: GUI components, layout and appearance, text messages, interaction strategies, Web site design, responsiveness issues, management decision-making, and even more at www.GUI-bloopers.com.* Organized and formatted based on the results of its own usability testing--so you can quickly find the information you need, packaged in easily digested pieces.*Announcing the sequel: Web Bloopers. Totally devoted to the Web. Go to www.web-bloopers.com.

Comments (7)

Oveley
Perhaps this is beside the point, but I was hoping that this book would contain some element of lighthearted humor while discussing such a dry topic. It does not.
The introduction states explicitly that the book is not intending to discuss either UI examples that are the most flagrantly hilarious, or examples that are the worst. Rather, the book critiques UI examples that are some of the most common. The examples are good, and described in depth, with specific reasons given for their classification as mistakes. There are also suggestions in some cases for how the designers could have avoided the blooper.
As a visual designer working primarily on the Web, I found this book as a good place to start learning more about the basics of an analytical approach to User Interface design. Even though the book focusses mostly on stand-alone application design, the principles can still be applied to UI issues on the Web, certainly in Web design using forms or heavy information structure. Some examples are hard to apply to the Web, for instance, the bloopers dealing with application menubar design issues are not widely applicable to Web pages. However, this book provides a great overview of the philosophy and process of UI design.
The worst thing I can say about this book, is that it isn't any fun to read, despite the impression given by the title. Since I come from a less analytical perspective on the topic, it definitely takes some determination to read this, although it is written in a straightforward and accessible manner. The most annoying aspect of the writing is that Jeff Johnson has apparently developed some bitterness towards everyone who is not a UI professional, and he rants constantly about developers, designers, marketing, and management. While his reasoning is usually valid, many entries read like the author is venting his issues to his psychiatrist after a hard week of consulting. With all the jaded complaining about developers (who seem to be his favorite target), I can't believe any of them can tolerate reading this book.
If you can get past Jeff Johnson's fanatical personality then there is much good insight to be gained from this book, for all User Interface novices.
Cemav
Despite the title, the "Do's" section of this book is where the meat lies. The "bloopers" are used as lead-ins on how to design interfaces with a focus on usability. If you're even contemplating designing anything from a web page to an installation shield, you should read this book. Customers should read this book, and managers should read this book. The book's really not aimed at programmers or graphic designers, but they'll find it plenty interesting, especially since programmers and graphic designers often design GUIs.
Johnson gives us a widget-by-widget tour of labels, text fields, buttons, radio buttons, check boxes, and overall layout management. But he doesn't stop there. The notion of usability also extends into issues like consistency. Even more important is responsiveness, the chapter on which is worth the price of the book alone.
What makes this book so enjoyable is the multitude of case studies. These aren't meant to make you laugh out loud like Lucille-Ball-botching-her-line bloopers, but rather to get you to concentrate on the bigger picture of usability. The longer case studies of Johnson's experience as a consultant on a set-top-box design project and a game interface project are interesting if you're thinking about working with or becoming an interface design consultant yourself.
Another benefit of the book is that it takes you through common and common sensical design strategies starting from needs analysis to paper prototyping to early focus group testing and refinement. The references to deeper studies in many of these areas are plentiful.
This book is more focused on GUIs than books like Ben Schneiderman's _Designing the User Interface_, which is a useful, thoughtful survey, but reads like a Ph.D. thesis compared to _GUI Bloopers_. Johnson is also focused on usability, in contrast to something like the _Java Look and Feel Design Guidelines_, which focuses exclusively on graphical layout issues, such as how many pixels to leave around 9 point sans serif font in a button and what color scheme to use for highlighted icons.
One final note: Johnson ate his own dog food and usability tested his book!
Malak
The author of this book does a very good job of describing and illustrating common GUI design mistakes. He has categorized the problems in broad topics such as "GUI Component Bloopers" and "Interaction Bloopers", then gives concrete examples of the bloopers that occur within each broad topic. The individual bloopers are well illustrated, and examples of better approaches are given.

Even though the applications used in the book are from the nineties, they are still very applicable, since the advice given frequently transcends the tools used to build the screens. It is applicable to web applications as well.

I read through this book once, and now use it as a reference.

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