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by Armand Mattelart

  • ISBN: 0816632871
  • Author: Armand Mattelart
  • ePub ver: 1616 kb
  • Fb2 ver: 1616 kb
  • Rating: 4.8 of 5
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Univ Of Minnesota Press; First edition edition (January 14, 2000)
  • Formats: lrf docx lit lrf
  • Category: IT
  • Subcategory: Networking & Cloud Computing
epub Networking the World, 1794-2000 download

This inevitably leads, says Mattelart, to what is essentially nothing more than human commodification, such that the marketplace of ideas is essentially a parroting frenzy of talking heads socioeconomically engineered to spread profitable memes. 2 people found this helpful.

Armand Mattelart (born January 8, 1936) is a Belgian sociologist and well . Networking the World 1794-2000 (University of Minnesota Press, 2000). The Information Society: An Introduction (SAGE Publications, 2003).

Armand Mattelart (born January 8, 1936) is a Belgian sociologist and well known as a Leftist French scholar. His work deals with media, culture and communication, specially in their historical and international dimensions. While in Chile Mattelart was appointed to confront from a catholic spiritual perspective the strategic models for family planning which were at the time being pushed by the Ford and Rockefeller Foundations and the Alianza para el Progreso (Alliance for Progress-a US official aid program).

Networking the World, 1794-2000 book. As Armand Mattelart demonstrates in Networking the World, 1794-2000, globalization and its attendant hype have existed since road and rail were the fastest way In the age of satellites and the Internet, worldwide communication has become increasingly unified amid overblown claims about the redemptive possibilities of international networks.

But this rhetoric is hardly new. As Armand Mattelart demonstrates in Networking the World, 1794-2000, globalization and its attendant hype have existed since road and rail were the fastest way to move information. Mattelart plates contemporary global communication networks into historical context and shows that the networking of the world began much earlier than many assume, in the late eighteenth century.

As Armand Mattelart demonstrates in Networking the World, 1794-2000, globalization and its .

As Armand Mattelart demonstrates in Networking the World, 1794-2000, globalization and its attendant hype have existed since road and rail were the fastest way to move information.

As Armand Mattelart demonstrates in Networking the World, 1794-2000, globalization .

item 1 Networking the World, 1794-2000 - Paperback NEW Armand Mattelar 2000-01-01 -Networking the World . Place of Publication. 2000-2009 Publication Year Paperbacks Books in Russian. 2000-2009 Publication Year Paperbacks Books in Welsh.

item 1 Networking the World, 1794-2000 - Paperback NEW Armand Mattelar 2000-01-01 -Networking the World, 1794-2000 - Paperback NEW Armand Mattelar 2000-01-01. item 2 Networking the World, 1794-2000 by Armand Mattelart (Paperback, 2000) -Networking the World, 1794-2000 by Armand Mattelart (Paperback, 2000). 2000-2009 Publication Year Paperbacks Books in Turkish. 2000-2009 Publication Year Paperbacks Books in Chinese.

oceedings{ingTW, title {Networking the World, 1794-2000}, author {Armand Mattelart and Liz Carey-Libbrecht and James A. Cohen}, year {2000} }. Armand Mattelart, Liz Carey-Libbrecht, James A. Cohen.

Networking the World, 1794-2000. By Armand Mattelart (L. Carey-Libbrecht & J. A. Cohen, Trans. Article · December 2001 with 212 Reads. The book describes western and especially American philosophies of the free exchange of information, and how America equates that to free exchange of all commercial products

Networking the World, 1794-2000. The book describes western and especially American philosophies of the free exchange of information, and how America equates that to free exchange of all commercial products. Although it doesn't mention Strauss or the neo-cons (mentions neo-liberals a lot), it does offer some interesting insight into the current American policy in Iraq.

In the age of satellites and the Internet, worldwide communication has become increasingly unified amid overblown claims about the redemptive possibilities of international networks. But this rhetoric is hardly new. As Armand Mattelart demonstrates in Networking the World, 1794-2000, globalization and its attendant hype have existed since road and rail were the fastest way to move information.

Mattelart plates contemporary global communication networks into historical context and shows that the networking of the world began much earlier than many assume, in the late eighteenth century. He argues that the internationalization of communication was spawned by such Enlightenment ideals as universalism and liberalism, and examines how the development of global communications has been inextricably linked to the industrial revolution, modern warfare, and the emergence of nationalism. Throughout, Mattelart eloquently argues that discourses of better living through globalization often mask projects of political, economic, and cultural domination.

Comments (3)

Drelahuginn
Armand Mattelart is a French professor of information and communication theory at the Université de Paris-VIII, Saint-Denis. His book is concisely written at only 123 pages and provides an insightful argument against globalization. Mattelart explains how freedom of speech translates on a global scale to freedom of commerce.

The central problem for Mattelart is that by letting corporations network the world, we are letting them control the marketplace of ideas, as if they have shackled the invisible hand of capitalistic self-governance. This inevitably leads, says Mattelart, to what is essentially nothing more than human commodification, such that the marketplace of ideas is essentially a parroting frenzy of talking heads socioeconomically engineered to spread profitable memes.
Diab
If you have not read this, do not consider yourself a human communication expert on any macro level. Network theorists? Include yourself as well.
roternow
A. Mattelart walks the reader through the main historical stages of the development of world networks. His presentation provides a necessary interpretation to understand the current stage of globalization as the product of specific Western economic strategies. The last part of the book is perhaps more interesting to the reader preoccupied with the impact of globalization on the planet--as a catalyst of new orders, but also as a cause of less evident disorders. As the capitalistic practices from which it stemmed, globalization is a two-edged sword: it brings opportunities of growth and progress as well as risks of fragmentation and evisceration of the social. Thus, for example, one of the main points of the book is the author's denunciation of the danger of the progressive substitution of the citizen by the consumer, that is, the loss of social content to our human condition and relations. The author places the threat of civil war "within each culture. This is where the fate of the globalization /fragmentation dialectic will be decided" (110-11). To avoid that, new strategies of collective resistance will have to be created. This is a challenge that the author does not flesh out in detail, but it's suggestive enough to the reader interested in further examining the topic.

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